Catalogue


Tragedy, recognition, and the death of God [electronic resource] : studies in Hegel and Nietzsche /
Robert R. Williams.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
description
xi, 410 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199656053, 9780199656059
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
isbn
0199656053
9780199656059
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Recognition -- Tragedy -- Overcoming the Kantian frame : the true infinite -- God beyond the death of God.
catalogue key
9989121
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Robert R. Williams offers a new account of divergences and convergences in the work of Hegel and Nietzsche, two of the most important thinkers on religion in the last 250 years. The opening discussion focuses on a philosophy of tragedy that overcomes the suppression and exclusion of tragedy by both traditional philosophy and theology. The second theme concerns Hegel and Nietzsche's views of recognition and community as requiring struggle and contestation, and their contrasting discussions of master and slave, and friendship. The third theme is their critique of Kant, including Kantian morality and its doctrine of the postulates of practical reason that constitutes for Hegel the spurious infinite and for Nietzsche the ascetic ideal. Williams describes how Kant's restriction of cognition to finitude and his doctrine of theology as a postulate of morality is for Hegel the death of God. For Hegel, this requires a response that overcomes the Kantian frame through a reconstruction and renewal of ontotheology-theology based on a reconstruction and defense of the ontological argument-while Nietzsche believes that Kant's restriction of cognition undercuts Socratism and opens up tragedy as a philosophical issue that also undercuts Kant's moral vision of the world. Finally, Williams explores the views of Nietzsche and Hegel on the death of God. Both agree that the God who is dead is the moral-juridical God whose abstract transcendence constitutes the spurious values of the ascetic ideal and the spurious infinite. However, although the moral God is dead, this does not put an end to the God-question or to theology: theology must incorporate the death of God as its own theme. This incorporation includes divine suffering, which in turn involves a tragic absolute-a theme of both the theology of the cross and Nietzsche's Dionysus. Williams argues that both Hegel and Nietzsche continue to pursue the theodicy question, not as a justification of the moral God, but rather as a question of the meaningfulness and goodness of existence despite nihilism and despite tragic conflict and suffering. He asserts that both thinkers criticize traditional theology and metaphysics and affirm with Heraclitus against classical metaphysics that being is an abstraction from becoming. They claim that reconciliation is no conflict-free harmony, but includes a paradoxical tragic dissonance: a disquieted bliss in disaster.
Reviews
Review Quotes
a major achievement based on years of thoughtful engagement with these fascinating philosophers . . . Williams's is a provocative book that, I hope, will provoke many to take up the challenges it poses to, among many other things, contemporary conceptions of philosophy itself.
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Summaries
Long Description
Hegel and Nietzsche are two of the most important figures in philosophy and religion. Robert R. Williams challenges the view that they are mutually exclusive. He identifies four areas of convergence. First, Hegel and Nietzsche express and define modern interest in tragedy as a philosophical topic. Each seeks to correct the traditional philosophical and theological suppression of a tragic view of existence. This suppression of the tragic is required by the moral vision of the world,both in the tradition and in Kant's practical philosophy and its postulates. For both Hegel and Nietzsche, the moral vision of the world is a projection of spurious, life-negating values that Nietzsche calls the ascetic ideal, and that Hegel identifies as the spurious infinite. The moral God is theenforcer of morality. Second, while acknowledging a tragic dimension of existence, Hegel and Nietzsche nevertheless affirm that existence is good in spite of suffering. Both affirm a vision of human freedom as open to otherness and requiring recognition and community. Struggle and contestation have affirmative significance for both. Third, while the moral God is dead, this does not put an end to the God-question. Theology must incorporate the death of God as its own theme. The union of God anddeath expressing divine love is for Hegel the basic speculative intuition. This implies a dipolar, panentheistic concept of a tragic, suffering God, who risks, loves, and reconciles. Fourth, Williams argues that both Hegel and Nietzsche pursue theodicy, not as a justification of the moral God, butrather as a question of the meaningfulness and goodness of existence despite nihilism and despite tragic conflict and suffering. The inseparability of divine love and anguish means that reconciliation is no conflict-free harmony, but includes a paradoxical tragic dissonance: reconciliation is a disquieted bliss in disaster.
Main Description
Hegel and Nietzsche are two of the most important figures in philosophy and religion. Robert R. Williams challenges the view that they are mutually exclusive. He identifies four areas of convergence. First, Hegel and Nietzsche express and define modern interest in tragedy as a philosophical topic. Each seeks to correct the traditional philosophical and theological suppression of a tragic view of existence. This suppression of the tragic is required by the moral vision of the world, both in the tradition and in Kant's practical philosophy and its postulates. For both Hegel and Nietzsche, the moral vision of the world is a projection of spurious, life-negating values that Nietzsche calls the ascetic ideal, and that Hegel identifies as the spurious infinite. The moral God is the enforcer of morality. Second, while acknowledging a tragic dimension of existence, Hegel and Nietzsche nevertheless affirm that existence is good in spite of suffering. Both affirm a vision of human freedom as open to otherness and requiring recognition and community. Struggle and contestation have affirmative significance for both. Third, while the moral God is dead, this does not put an end to the God-question. Theology must incorporate the death of God as its own theme. The union of God and death expressing divine love is for Hegel the basic speculative intuition. This implies a dipolar, panentheistic concept of a tragic, suffering God, who risks, loves, and reconciles. Fourth, Williams argues that both Hegel and Nietzsche pursue theodicy, not as a justification of the moral God, but rather as a question of the meaningfulness and goodness of existence despite nihilism and despite tragic conflict and suffering. The inseparability of divine love and anguish means that reconciliation is no conflict-free harmony, but includes a paradoxical tragic dissonance: reconciliation is a disquieted bliss in disaster.
Main Description
Hegel and Nietzsche are two of the most important figures in philosophy and religion. Robert R. Williams challenges the view that they are mutually exclusive. He identifies four areas of convergence. First, Hegel and Nietzsche express and define modern interest in tragedy as a philosophicaltopic. Each seeks to correct the traditional philosophical and theological suppression of a tragic view of existence. This suppression of the tragic is required by the moral vision of the world, both in the tradition and in Kant's practical philosophy and its postulates. For both Hegel andNietzsche, the moral vision of the world is a projection of spurious, life-negating values that Nietzsche calls the ascetic ideal, and that Hegel identifies as the spurious infinite. The moral God is the enforcer of morality. Second, while acknowledging a tragic dimension of existence, Hegel andNietzsche nevertheless affirm that existence is good in spite of suffering. Both affirm a vision of human freedom as open to otherness and requiring recognition and community. Struggle and contestation have affirmative significance for both. Third, while the moral God is dead, this does not put anend to the God-question. Theology must incorporate the death of God as its own theme. The union of God and death expressing divine love is for Hegel the basic speculative intuition. This implies a dipolar, panentheistic concept of a tragic, suffering God, who risks, loves, and reconciles. Fourth,Williams argues that both Hegel and Nietzsche pursue theodicy, not as a justification of the moral God, but rather as a question of the meaningfulness and goodness of existence despite nihilism and despite tragic conflict and suffering. The inseparability of divine love and anguish means thatreconciliation is no conflict-free harmony, but includes a paradoxical tragic dissonance: reconciliation is a disquieted bliss in disaster.
Table of Contents
Abbreviations of Frequently Cited Worksp. x
Introductionp. 1
Recognitionp. 6
Tragedyp. 8
The Kantian Framep. 9
Hegel's Criticism of Kant and Jacobip. 10
Critique of Foundationalism: Decentering the Subjectp. 12
Hegel's True Infinite as Social Infinity: Panentheismp. 15
A Contemporary Expression of the Frame: Non-Metaphysical Readings of Hegelp. 16
Overcoming the Kantian Framep. 21
The Death of God and Theodicy after the Death of Godp. 26
Acknowledgmentsp. 29
Recognition
Hegel and Nietzsche: Recognition and Master/Slavep. 33
Hegel: Recognition and Master/Slavep. 34
Deleuze: Nietzsche Anti-Hegelp. 38
Recognition and Representationp. 40
Is Recognition Inherently Servile?p. 44
Genealogy, Hierarchy, and the Question of Communityp. 47
Aristotle, Hegel, and Nietzsche on Friendshipp. 54
Aristotle on Greatness of Soul (Megalopsychia)p. 58
Aristotle on Philiap. 63
Limitations and Questionsp. 68
Nietzsche: Two Views of Friendshipp. 69
An Agonic Model of Friendship?p. 73
Hegel: Recognition, Friendship, Social Virtuesp. 77
Love and the Virtues: Hegel's Early Theological Writingsp. 83
The Agon, Recognition, and the Question of Communityp. 87
The Agonp. 88
Affirmative Social Ontology in Human, All Too Humanp. 91
Social Ontology in Nietzsche's Later Writingsp. 94
The Tragic Type: Transgressive Experimentationp. 100
The Agon and the Will to Powerp. 106
Tragedy
Philosophy and Tragedyp. 115
Hegel's Conception of Tragedyp. 120
Fate, Love, and Reconciliation in the Early Theological Writingsp. 120
Tragedy and Dialecticp. 124
Preliminary Survey of Hegel's Concept of Tragedyp. 125
The Background Assumptions of Tragedyp. 126
Actionp. 126
Resolutionp. 127
Background of the Tragic: The Divine-Human Ethical Orderp. 127
Actionp. 130
Tragic Resolutionp. 136
Nietzsche on Tragedyp. 143
The Tragic Mythp. 144
Apollinian and Dionysian Themesp. 150
The Philosophical-Conceptual Articulation of the Tragic Mythp. 152
Overcoming the Kantian Frame: The True Infinite
Hegel's Concept of the True Infinitep. 161
The True Infinite According to Wallacep. 167
The True Infinite Corrected: Stephen Houlgate's The Opening of Hegel's Logicp. 171
The True Infinite and Hegel's Theology: Questionsp. 173
The Stubbornness of Finitude: The Kantian Framep. 175
Critique of Kant's Postulates: The Oughtp. 177
The Dialectical Self-Sublation of Finitudep. 180
Reversal: The True Infinite Includes the Finitep. 183
Summary and Conclusionp. 185
Hegel's Recasting of Theological Proofsp. 190
Kant: The God-Question Both Inevitable and Impossible to Answerp. 190
Critique of Kant's God Postulate and Attack on the Theological Proofsp. 192
Jacobi's Objection and its Contributionp. 197
Recasting the Cosmological Argument as Ascent of Spirit to Godp. 203
The Ontological Proofp. 206
Anselm's Argument: Its Defectp. 206
The Difference and Identity Between Concept and Beingp. 210
The Wound of Cognitionp. 213
Healing the Wound of Cognitionp. 215
Being as the Self-Specification of the Conceptp. 216
Culmination of the Ascent: The Speculative Reversalp. 219
The Ontological Proof, Absolute Spirit, and God's Ethical Aseityp. 224
God Beyond the Death of God
Theogenesis, Divine Suffering, Demythologizing the Demonicp. 231
Iljin on Speculative Concretenessp. 232
Hegel's Logic as Speculative Theologyp. 236
Hegel's Panlogist Pantheism and Its Crisisp. 240
Towards an Evaluation of Iljin's Thesisp. 241
O'Regan's and Ricoeur's Theogonic Readings of Hegelp. 244
The Tragic Coincidence of Evil with Finitude: Human Imputabilityp. 247
Hegel's Rejection of Tragic Theology and Theogonyp. 256
Nietzsche on the Death of God and Eternal Recurrencep. 263
Living with Nihilism: Nietzsche's Tragic Experimentalismp. 264
Nietzsche's Tragic Experimentalism and Ironyp. 269
Eternal Recurrencep. 272
The Incoherence of Eternal Recurrence: Karl Löwithp. 275
The Coherence of Eternal Recurrence: Will Dudleyp. 277
Joyous Fatalism: Nietzschean Religion and Theologyp. 283
Hegel on the Death of God: The Inseparability of Love and Anguishp. 290
Introductionp. 290
The Suppression of Otherness and Tragedy in Traditional Philosophy and Theologyp. 291
The Death of God and Divine Sufferingp. 296
Theopassianism, Metaphysics, and Ontotheologyp. 302
Traditional Ontotheology as the Subjective Impotence of Reasonp. 304
The Appropriation of Reconciliationp. 312
Hegel's Critique of Modernity: The Separation of Love from Anguishp. 314
Nietzsche's Aesthetic Theodicyp. 322
Nietzsche's Atheist Theodicy of This-World Redemptionp. 324
Michel Haar: Theodicy After the Death of Godp. 326
Haar's Three Nietzschean Theodiciesp. 330
The Metaphysics of the One: There is a Wholep. 331
Anti-metaphysics: Nietzsche's Recoil against Identity and Totalityp. 333
The Tragic Absolute: Heraclitus, Hegel, and Nietzschep. 335
Final Questionsp. 344
Hegel's Death of God Theodicyp. 349
Beyond the Moral God: Harris and Iljin on Hegel's Theodicyp. 352
The Death of God as the Speculative Intuitionp. 358
Theology and Tragedy: Ricoeur and Hegel on Jobp. 360
World History as Court of World Judgment: Reconciliation in Hegel's Theodicyp. 364
The Slaughterhouse: Dysteleological Evil and Divine Consolationp. 372
The Alien Work of Love: Hegel and Tillich on Divine Love and Creativityp. 378
Selected Bibliographyp. 391
Index of Personsp. 401
Subject Indexp. 403
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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