Catalogue


An ordinary marriage [electronic resource]: the world of a gentry family in provincial Russia /
Katherine Pickering Antonova.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, [2013]
description
xv, 304 pages, [8] pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
ISBN
9780199796991 (hardback : alkaline paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, [2013]
isbn
9780199796991 (hardback : alkaline paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction -- A provincial world -- Society -- The village -- Estate management -- Sociability, charity, and leisure -- Illness, grief and death -- Domesticity and motherhood -- The education of Aleksei -- Education for all -- The landscape of ideas.
catalogue key
9983619
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Drawing on a unique body of sources, Katherine Pickering Antonova masterfully shows how gender roles that diverged significantly from emerging ideals of domesticity structured and gave meaning to life within a provincial serf-owning family and helped preserve its estates." --William G. Wagner, Brown Professor of History, Williams College "An Ordinary Marriageoffers a remarkably vivid account of the life of a provincial noble clan, the Chikhachevs, during the nineteenth century. Deftly using diaries, letters, and estate records, Katherine Pickering Antonova offers new insight into household and estate management, leisure, charity, and the intellectual world within which this family lived over several generations. Her book adds significantly to the growing list of impressive new work devoted to the 'middling folk' of Imperial Russia. It belongs on the shelf of every Russian historian." --Gary Marker, professor of history, State University of New York at Stony Brook
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
An Ordinary Marriage is the story of the Chikhachevs, middling-income gentry landowners in nineteenth-century provincial Russia. In a seemingly strange contradiction, the mother of this family, Natalia, oversaw serf labor and managed finances while the father, Andrei, raised the children, at a time when domestic ideology advocating a woman's place in the home was at its height in European advice manuals. But Andrei Chikhachev defined masculinity as a realm ofintellectualism existing symbolically "outside the home." The father's place could be in charge of "moral education," defined as an intellectual task. Managing estates that often barely yielded a livable income was a practical task and therefore considered less elevated, though still vitally important to the family'sinterests. Thus, estate management was available to gentry women like Natalia Chikhacheva, and the fact that it inevitably expanded their realm of influence and opportunity (within the limits of their estates), and that it increased their centrality to the family's material security relative to their social counterparts to the west, was accidental.An Ordinary Marriage examines the daily activities and ideas of the family based on multiple overlapping diaries and informal correspondence by the husband, wife, and son of the family, as well as the wife's brother. No such cache of intimate Russian family documents has ever previously been studied in such depth. The family's relative obscurity (with no pretensions to fame, wealth, or influence) and the presence of a woman's private documents are especially unusual in any context. Thebook considers the Chikhachevs' social life, reading habits, attitudes toward illness and death, as well as their gendered marital roles and their reception of major ideas of their time, such as domesticity, Enlightenment, sentimentalism, and Romanticism.
Main Description
An Ordinary Marriage is the story of the Chikhachevs, middling-income gentry landowners in nineteenth-century provincial Russia. In a seemingly strange contradiction, the mother of this family, Natalia, oversaw serf labor and managed finances while the father, Andrei, raised the children, at atime when domestic ideology advocating a woman's place in the home was at its height in European advice manuals. But Andrei Chikhachev defined masculinity as a realm of intellectualism existing symbolically "outside the home." The father's place could be in charge of "moral education," defined as an intellectual task. Managing estates that often barely yielded a livable income was a practical task and therefore considered less elevated, though still vitally important to the family's interests. Thus, estate management wasavailable to gentry women like Natalia Chikhacheva, and the fact that it inevitably expanded their realm of influence and opportunity (within the limits of their estates), and that it increased their centrality to the family's material security relative to their social counterparts to the west, wasaccidental.An Ordinary Marriage examines the daily activities and ideas of the family based on multiple overlapping diaries and informal correspondence by the husband, wife, and son of the family, as well as the wife's brother. No such cache of intimate Russian family documents has ever previously been studiedin such depth. The family's relative obscurity (with no pretensions to fame, wealth, or influence) and the presence of a woman's private documents are especially unusual in any context. The book considers the Chikhachevs' social life, reading habits, attitudes toward illness and death, as well astheir gendered marital roles and their reception of major ideas of their time, such as domesticity, Enlightenment, sentimentalism, and Romanticism.
Main Description
An Ordinary Marriageis the story of the Chikhachevs, middling-income gentry landowners in nineteenth-century provincial Russia. In a seemingly strange contradiction, the mother of this family, Natalia, oversaw serf labor and managed finances while the father, Andrei, raised the children, at a time when domestic ideology advocating a woman's place in the home was at its height in European advice manuals. But Andrei Chikhachev defined masculinity as a realm of intellectualism existing symbolically "outside the home." The father's place could be in charge of "moral education," defined as an intellectual task. Managing estates that often barely yielded a livable income was a practical task and therefore considered less elevated, though still vitally important to the family's interests. Thus, estate management was available to gentry women like Natalia Chikhacheva, and the fact that it inevitably expanded their realm of influence and opportunity (within the limits of their estates), and that it increased their centrality to the family's material security relative to their social counterparts to the west, was accidental. An Ordinary Marriageexamines the daily activities and ideas of the family based on multiple overlapping diaries and informal correspondence by the husband, wife, and son of the family, as well as the wife's brother. No such cache of intimate Russian family documents has ever previously been studied in such depth. The family's relative obscurity (with no pretensions to fame, wealth, or influence) and the presence of a woman's private documents are especially unusual in any context. The book considers the Chikhachevs' social life, reading habits, attitudes toward illness and death, as well as their gendered marital roles and their reception of major ideas of their time, such as domesticity, Enlightenment, sentimentalism, and Romanticism.
Main Description
An Ordinary Marriageis the story of the Chikhachevs, middling-income gentry landowners in nineteenth-century provincial Russia. In a seemingly strange contradiction, the mother of this family, Natalia, oversaw serf labor and managed finances while the father, Andrei, raised the children, at a time when domestic ideology advocating a woman's place in the home was at its height in European advice manuals. But Andrei Chikhachev defined masculinity as a realm of intellectualism; the father could be in charge of moral education, defined as an intellectual task. Managing estates that often barely yielded a livable income was a practical task and therefore considered less elevated, though still vitally important to the family's interests. Thus estate management was available to gentry women like Natalia Chikhacheva, and the fact that it inevitably expanded their realm of influence and opportunity (within the limits of their estates), and that it increased their centrality to the family's material security relative to their social counterparts to the west, was accidental. An Ordinary Marriageexamines the daily activities and ideas of the family based on multiple overlapping diaries and informal correspondence by the husband, wife, and son of the family, as well as the wife's brother. No such cache of intimate Russian family documents has ever previously been studied in such depth. The family's relative obscurity (with no pretensions to fame, wealth, or influence) and the presence of a woman's private documents are especially unusual in any context. The book considers the Chikhachevs' social life, reading habits, attitudes toward illness and death, as well as their marital roles and their reception of major ideas of their time, such as domesticity, Enlightenment, sentimentalism, and Romanticism.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
A Note on Languagep. xiv
Family Treesp. xvi
Mapsp. xviii
Introductionp. 1
A Provincial Worldp. 8
Societyp. 23
The Villagep. 47
Estate Managementp. 74
Sociability, Charity, and Leisurep. 95
Illness, Grief, and Deathp. 119
Domesticity and Motherhoodp. 136
The Education of Alekseip. 157
Education for Allp. 182
The Landscape of Ideasp. 202
Conclusionp. 227
Notesp. 237
Selected Bibliographyp. 287
Indexp. 295
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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