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The fortunes of liberalism [electronic resource] : essays on Austrian economics and the ideal of freedom /
edited by Peter G. Klein.
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1992.
description
xii, 279 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0226320642
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1992.
isbn
0226320642
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
9979449
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1992-03-15:
To the unprepared reader, this book is at first puzzling, beginning with prehistoric myth and emerging into Greek and Roman epic and philosophy. However, by the time readers have made their way through the Middle Ages and up to the 19th and 20th centuries, they become aware of the various impacts forests have had on human culture and psyche as reflected in the literature of the period. From the primitive fear of the chaotic wilderness to the forest as refuge from oppression and tyranny, to the tamed and rationally managed forests of enlightened Europe, we see how humans have been affected by the concept ``forest'' and how forests have been exploited by humans. A beautifully written book, thought-provoking and scholarly, it will attract a readership interested in more than just a superficial survey of conservation and environmental dangers.-- Eleanor Maass, Maass Assocs., New Milford, Pa. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1992-04-13:
In this scholarly work, Harrison, who teaches French and Italian literature at Stanford, traces the forest as a cultural entity through the ages. To early peoples it was a hostile place (the word ``forest'' derives from the Latin word for ``outside''); to a later civilization, the forest came between the people and their gods. Harrison cites the epic of Gilgamesh, Greek and Roman myths, and the tales of the brothers Grimm. Other sources are the works of 19th- and 20th-century writers--Wordsworth, Conrad, Sartre, Thoreau, Leopardi, John Clare and Andrea Zanzotto, among others? . Examining the German obsession with forests, Harrison notes that in the Western imagination the forest is a paradox--a place of danger and yet a sanctuary, at once sacred and profane. He looks at the etymologies of ``logos'' and ``ecology'' and concludes that we dwell not in nature but in relation to nature, thus offering a provocative view of the future in terms of Western culture, not just of the fate of forests. Illustrations not seen by PW. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews, February 1992
Library Journal, March 1992
Publishers Weekly, April 1992
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The Reagan and Thatcher "revolutions." The collapse of Eastern Europe dramatically captured in the tearing down of the Berlin Wall. F. A. Hayek, "grand old man of capitalism" and founder of the classical liberal, free-market revival which ignited and inspired these world events, forcefully predicted their occurrence in writings such asThe Road to Serfdom, first published in 1944. Hayek's well-known social and political philosophy--in particular his long-held pessimistic view of the prospects of socialism, irrefutably vindicated by the recent collapse of the Eastern bloc--is fully grounded in the Austrian approach to economics. In this new collection, Hayek traces his intellectual roots to the Austrian school, the century-old tradition founded at the University of Vienna by Carl Menger, and links it to the modern rebirth of classical liberal or libertarian thought. As Hayek reminds us, the cornerstone of modern economics--the theory of value and price--"represents a consistent continuation of the fundamental principles handed down by the Vienna school." Here, in this first modern collection of essays on the Austrian school by one of its preeminent figures, is the genesis of this tradition and its place in intellectual history. Reflections on Hayek's days as a young economic theorist in Vienna, his opening address to the inaugural meeting of the Mont Pegrave;lerin Society, and essays on former teachers and other leading figures in the Austrian school are included in volume 4. Two hitherto unavailable memoirs, "The Economics of the 1920s as Seen from Vienna," published here for the first time, and "The Rediscovery of Freedom: Personal Recollections," available for the first time in English, make this collection invaluable for Hayek scholars. Hayek's writings continue to provide an invaluable education in a subject which is nothing less than the development of the modern world. F. A. Hayek, awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1974, was a pioneer in monetary theory and the principal proponent of the libertarian philosophy. Hayek was the author of numerous books and was professor emeritus at the University of Freiburg and the University of Chicago.
Main Description
The Reagan and Thatcher "revolutions." The collapse of Eastern Europe dramatically captured in the tearing down of the Berlin Wall. F. A. Hayek, "grand old man of capitalism" and founder of the classical liberal, free-market revival which ignited and inspired these world events, forcefully predicted their occurrence in writings such as The Road to Serfdom , first published in 1944. Hayek's well-known social and political philosophyin particular his long-held pessimistic view of the prospects of socialism, irrefutably vindicated by the recent collapse of the Eastern blocis fully grounded in the Austrian approach to economics. In this new collection, Hayek traces his intellectual roots to the Austrian school, the century-old tradition founded at the University of Vienna by Carl Menger, and links it to the modern rebirth of classical liberal or libertarian thought. As Hayek reminds us, the cornerstone of modern economicsthe theory of value and price"represents a consistent continuation of the fundamental principles handed down by the Vienna school." Here, in this first modern collection of essays on the Austrian school by one of its preeminent figures, is the genesis of this tradition and its place in intellectual history. Reflections on Hayek's days as a young economic theorist in Vienna, his opening address to the inaugural meeting of the Mont Pelerin Society, and essays on former teachers and other leading figures in the Austrian school are included in volume 4. Two hitherto unavailable memoirs, "The Economics of the 1920s as Seen from Vienna," published here for the first time, and "The Rediscovery of Freedom: Personal Recollections," available for the first time in English, make this collection invaluable for Hayek scholars. Hayek's writings continue to provide an invaluable education in a subject which is nothing less than the development of the modern world.
Main Description
The Reagan and Thatcher "revolutions." The collapse of Eastern Europe dramatically captured in the tearing down of the Berlin Wall. F. A. Hayek, "grand old man of capitalism" and founder of the classical liberal, free-market revival which ignited and inspired these world events, forcefully predicted their occurrence in writings such as The Road to Serfdom , first published in 1944. Hayek's well-known social and political philosophyin particular his long-held pessimistic view of the prospects of socialism, irrefutably vindicated by the recent collapse of the Eastern blocis fully grounded in the Austrian approach to economics. In this new collection, Hayek traces his intellectual roots to the Austrian school, the century-old tradition founded at the University of Vienna by Carl Menger, and links it to the modern rebirth of classical liberal or libertarian thought. As Hayek reminds us, the cornerstone of modern economicsthe theory of value and price"represents a consistent continuation of the fundamental principles handed down by the Vienna school." Here, in this first modern collection of essays on the Austrian school by one of its preeminent figures, is the genesis of this tradition and its place in intellectual history. Reflections on Hayek's days as a young economic theorist in Vienna, his opening address to the inaugural meeting of the Mont P lerin Society, and essays on former teachers and other leading figures in the Austrian school are included in volume 4. Two hitherto unavailable memoirs, "The Economics of the 1920s as Seen from Vienna," published here for the first time, and "The Rediscovery of Freedom: Personal Recollections," available for the first time in English, make this collection invaluable for Hayek scholars. Hayek's writings continue to provide an invaluable education in a subject which is nothing less than the development of the modern world. F. A. Hayek, awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1974, was a pioneer in monetary theory and the principal proponent of the libertarian philosophy. Hayek was the author of numerous books and was professor emeritus at the University of Freiburg and the University of Chicago.
Table of Contents
Editorial
Foreword
Introduction
The Austrian School of Economics Prologue
The Economics of the 1920s as Seen from Vienna Addenda: John Bates Clark (1847-1938) Wesley Clair Mitchell (1874-1948)
The Austrian School of Economics Addendum: In Britain and the United States
Carl Menger (1840-1921) Addendum: The Place of Menger's Grundsauml;tze in the History of Economic Thought
Friedrich von Wieser (1851-1926)
Ludwig von Mises (1881-1973)
Joseph Schumpeter (1883-1950)
Ewald Schams (1899-1955) and Richard von Strigl (1891-1942) Addendum: Strigl's Theory of Wages
Ernst Mach (1838-1916) and the Social Sciences in Vienna Coda
Remembering My Cousin Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951)
The Fortunes of Liberalism Prologue
The Rediscovery of Freedom: Personal Recollections Addenda: Tribute to Rouml;pke Rouml;pke's Theory of Capital Formation Hallowell on the Decline of Liberalism as an Ideology
Historians and the Future of Europe
The Actonian Revival: On Lord Acton (1834-1902)
Is There a German Nation?
A Plan for the Future of Germany Addendum: The Future of Austria
Opening Address to a Conference at Mont Pegrave;lerin
The Tragedy of Organised Humanity: de Jouvenel on Power
Bruno Leoni (1913-1967) and Leonard Read (1898-1983)
Editor's Acknowledgments
Chronological
List of Contents
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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