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Death or disability? [electronic resource] : the 'Carmentis Machine' and decision-making for critically ill children /
Dominic Wilkinson.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Oxford, UK : Oxford University Press, 2013.
description
vi, 311 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199669430, 9780199669431
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford, UK : Oxford University Press, 2013.
isbn
0199669430
9780199669431
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Death and grief in the ancient world -- Predictions and disability in Rome.
catalogue key
9977273
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
The author skilfully draws on his training in philosophy, bioscience and clinical practice to offer an analysis that is original, not merely in content but also in form. Wilkinsons comparison of the Carmentis Machine with contemporary neuroimaging is inspired.
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Summaries
Long Description
In ancient Rome parents would consult the priestess Carmentis shortly after birth to obtain prophecies of the future of their newborn infant. Today, parents and doctors of critically ill children consult a different oracle. Neuroimaging provides a vision of the child's future, particularly of the nature and severity of any disability. Based on the results of brain scans and other tests doctors and parents face heart-breaking decisions about whether or not to continue intensivetreatment or to allow the child to die. Paediatrician and ethicist Dominic Wilkinson looks at the profound and contentious ethical issues facing those who work in intensive care caring for critically ill children and infants. When should infants or children be allowed to die? How accurate are predictions of future quality of life? How much say should parents have in these decisions? How should they deal with uncertainty about the future? He combines philosophy, medicine and science to shed light on current and futuredilemmas.
Main Description
In ancient Rome parents would consult the priestess Carmentis shortly after birth to obtain prophecies of the future of their newborn infant. Today, parents and doctors of critically ill children consult a different oracle. Neuroimaging provides a vision of the child's future, particularly of the nature and severity of any disability. Based on the results of brain scans and other tests doctors and parents face heart-breaking decisions about whether or not to continue intensive treatment or to allow the child to die. Paediatrician and ethicist Dominic Wilkinson looks at the profound and contentious ethical issues facing those who work in intensive care caring for critically ill children and infants. When should infants or children be allowed to die? How accurate are predictions of future quality of life? How much say should parents have in these decisions? How should they deal with uncertainty about the future? He combines philosophy, medicine and science to shed light on current and future dilemmas.
Main Description
In ancient Rome parents would consult the priestess Carmentis shortly after birth to obtain prophecies of the future of their newborn infant. Today, parents and doctors of critically ill children consult a different oracle. Neuroimaging provides a vision of the child's future, particularly ofthe nature and severity of any disability. Based on the results of brain scans and other tests doctors and parents face heart-breaking decisions about whether or not to continue intensive treatment or to allow the child to die. Paediatrician and ethicist Dominic Wilkinson looks at the profound and contentious ethical issues facing those who work in intensive care caring for critically ill children and infants. When should infants or children be allowed to die? How accurate are predictions of future quality of life? Howmuch say should parents have in these decisions? How should they deal with uncertainty about the future? He combines philosophy, medicine and science to shed light on current and future dilemmas.
Main Description
Paediatrician and ethicist Dominic Wilkinson looks at the profound and contentious ethical issues facing those who work in intensive care caring for critically ill children and infants. When should infants or children be allowed to die? How accurate are predictions of future quality of life? How much say should parents have in these decisions? How should they deal with uncertainty about the future? He combines philosophy, medicine and science to shed light oncurrent and future dilemmas.
Table of Contents
List of Figures and Tablesp. viii
The Temple of Carmentis 30 ADp. 1
The Carmentis Machine 2030 ADp. 5
Introduction: Neuroethics and Intensive Carep. 11
Death and Grief in the Ancient Worldp. 21
Destiny, Disability, and Deathp. 23
Carmentisp. 45
Best Interests and the Carmentis Machinep. 46
Starting Againp. 82
Exposure and Infanticide in Ancient Romep. 105
Competing Interestsp. 108
Predictions and Disability in Romep. 159
Sources of Uncertainty-Prognostic Researchp. 162
Managing Uncertaintyp. 202
Interests and Uncertaintyp. 236
The Threshold Frameworkp. 261
Indexp. 309
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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