Catalogue


Corruption and state politics in Sierra Leone /
William Reno.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
description
xii, 229 p.
ISBN
0521471796 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
isbn
0521471796 (hardback)
catalogue key
997574
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-02:
Reno delves into Sierra Leone's political and economic history to answer a puzzling question: why have structural adjustment programs, efforts at bureaucratic strengthening, and technical assistance failed in many states? State power and societal networks, he argues, are intimately linked. The result has been a "shadow state," rooted in colonial rule and extended by successive African leaders. Administrative and economic efficiency were sacrificed for patrimonial political control, in which Sierra Leone's diamond resources played a central part. Even hardheaded agencies such as IMF fell into the trap of supporting incumbents bent on preserving their power rather than promoting effective governance. Reno's study thus usefully applies and extends the "politics of the belly" thesis developed by Jean-Fran,cois Bayart, and revises concepts of the "lame leviathan" popularized by Thomas Callaghy, Michael Schatzberg, and Crawford Young and Thomas Turner. This interesting, concise and well-documented book has implications far beyond the territorial limits of Sierra Leone. Upper-division through faculty. C. E. Welch; SUNY at Buffalo
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1996
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Summaries
Main Description
William Reno provides a powerful, scholarly yet shocking account of the inner workings of an African state. He focuses upon the ties between foreign firms and African rulers in Sierra Leone, where politicians and warlords use private networks that exploit relationships with international businesses to buttress their wealth and so extend their powers of patronage. This permits them to expand the reach of their governments in unorthodox ways, but in the process they undermine the bureaucracty of their own states. Dr Reno suggests that as the post-colonial state is eroded there is a return to the enclave economies and private armies that characterised the pre-colonial and colonial arrangements between European businessmen or administrators and some African political figures.
Description for Bookstore
In this case study of contemporary Sierra Leone, William Reno argues that the global reach of some foreign firms offer supposedly 'weak' African rulers political resources to reshape regimes in ways that do not include building the 'strong stakes' that reformers expect.
Description for Library
This powerful yet shocking account of the inner workings of an African state examines the ties between foreign firms and rulers in Sierra Leone. Politicians and warlords use private networks involving international businesses to buttress their wealth and so extend their powers of patronage. By expanding the reach of their governments in unorthodox ways, they undermine the bureaucracy of their own states. With the erosion of the post-colonial state comes a return to the enclave economies and private armies that characterised the pre-colonial and colonial arrangements between European businessmen and administrators and some African political figures.
Table of Contents
Informal markets and the shadow state: some theoretical issues
Colonial rule and the foundations of the shadow state
Elite hegemony and the threat of political and economic reform
Reining in the informal market: the early Stevens' years, 1968-1973
An exchange of services: state power and the diamond business
The shadow state and international commerce
Foreign firms, economic 'reform' and shadow state power
The changing character of African sovereignty
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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