Catalogue


Ambition and desire : the dangerous life of Josephine Bonaparte /
Kate Williams.
imprint
Toronto : McClelland & Stewart, 2014.
description
viii, 384 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some colour), portraits (some colour) ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0771088590 (Cloth), 9780771088599 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : McClelland & Stewart, 2014.
isbn
0771088590 (Cloth)
9780771088599 (Cloth)
catalogue key
9907519
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 337-365) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
Advance Praise for Mistress of Empires "Kate Williams has excelled herself. She has perfected the art of historical biography . . . her pacy writing is underpinned by the most impeccable scholarship." Alison Weir
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Summaries
Main Description
Josephine de Beauharnais began as a kept woman of Paris and became the most powerful woman in France. She was no beauty, her teeth were rotten, and she was six years older than her husband, but one twitch of her skirt could bring running the man who terrorized Europe. The tale of Napoleon and Josephine is one of the most famous love stories in the world. They were bound together by a scorching erotic fascination. With her, he became the greatest man in Europe, the Supreme Emperor. And yet, envisioning Josephine as the calm consort on the sofa obscures many of the most fascinating aspects of her story. How did she rise to such an astonishing position? How did she perfect the art of the beautiful, sweet chameleon - and thus fool so many? What and whom did she sacrifice on the bonfire of her ambition? France in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century was a country in such extreme flux that everything was accessible - and possible. But it took an incredible woman to seize the opportunities. "Mistress of Empires" shows how the little girl from Martinique became the Queen of France. Drawing on new sources from the Paris archives, "Mistress of Empires" is a searing story of sexual obsession, war, heartbreak, affairs, devastating love, plots and murder and politics - in a world that was being altered forever.
Main Description
Josephine de Beauharnais began as a kept woman of Paris and became the most powerful woman in France. She was no beauty, her teeth were rotten, and she was six years older than her husband, but one twitch of her skirt could bring running the man who terrorized Europe. The tale of Napoleon and Josephine is one of the most famous love stories in the world. They were bound together by a scorching erotic fascination. With her, he became the greatest man in Europe, the Supreme Emperor. And yet, envisioning Josephine as the calm consort on the sofa obscures many of the most fascinating aspects of her story. How did she rise to such an astonishing position? How did she perfect the art of the beautiful, sweet chameleon - and thus fool so many? What and whom did she sacrifice on the bonfire of her ambition? France in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century was a country in such extreme flux that everything was accessible - and possible. But it took an incredible woman to seize the opportunities. Mistress of Empires shows how the little girl from Martinique became the Queen of France. Drawing on new sources from the Paris archives, Mistress of Empires is a searing story of sexual obsession, war, heartbreak, affairs, devastating love, plots and murder and politics - in a world that was being altered forever.

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