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Southern comfort [electronic resource] : the Garden District of New Orleans /
S. Frederick Starr ; photographs by Robert S. Brantley and Jan White Brantley.
edition
Pbk. ed.
imprint
New York, N.Y. : Princeton Architectural Press, [2005]
description
viii, 265 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
1568985460 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York, N.Y. : Princeton Architectural Press, [2005]
isbn
1568985460 (pbk. : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
City and suburb -- Uptown and the americanization of New Orleans -- The patrons -- Antebellum style -- James Robb, magnate and patron -- Architects and builders -- Architects of opulence -- The culture of comfort -- Slaves, servants, and retainers -- A neighborhood war, 1861-1865 -- Men and mansions of the postwar bubble -- End of an era.
catalogue key
9903200
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [257]-259) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1990-05:
Starr describes the Garden District of New Orleans as "an unparalleled museum for the study of 19th-century architecture and society." He analyzes the causes of the Garden District's emergence as a distinctive and largely homogeneous suburb in the antebellum years, the networks of trade its self-made entrepreneurial elite established, and the houses that proclaimed their owners' status. The author examines the interrelationship of architects, patrons, and builders as well as that of masters, servants, and slaves; the District's ethnic composition and Whig political culture; and gender roles within the home. Ironically, in the post-Civil War years, when a new mythology began to romanticize the Garden District, its architecture became less homogeneous and less noticeably regional or local. Paralleling the breakdown of an older sense of community, new residences were flamboyant, aggressively individualistic, withdrawn from the street. Based upon such records as Notarial Archives, tax rolls, census data, and court records, as well as generations of scholarship, Southern Comfort combines architectural and social history in a creative, persuasive way. Highly recommended. -D. Schuyler, Franklin and Marshall College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This book is a valuable contribution to Southern history and to the history of both American architecture and American cities.....
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Southern Comfort' details the architecture & planning of the Garden District of New Orleans, looking at the developers, owners, architects, labourers & craftsmen who shaped this area of the city.
Main Description
Southern Comfort details the magnificent architecture and planning of the Garden District of New Orleans. Through the histories of the developers, owners, architects, laborers, and craftspeople who shaped this district, the book creates a picture of the uniquely cosmopolitan city in the American South. "This book is a valuable contribution to Southern history and to the history of both American architecture and American cities....Southern Comfort is a landmark piece of scholarship on the area." Anne Rice, New York Times Book Review "There's no part of New Orleans so steeped in architectural history as the Garden District. Southern Comfort: The Garden District of New Orleans tells the story in words and rich photos." Hemispheres
Main Description
The Garden District epitomizes the beauty and mystery of New Orleans; the stately residences and gardens of this historic area are known worldwide for their graciousness and ease. The financial prosperity of nineteenth-century New Orleans, a center of commerce and culture, enabled wealthy newcomers with similar values and tastes to construct a neighborhood of opulent homes, creating a suburb with a unified style. This neighborhood-the Garden District-was situated along one of the first street railway lines in the country, and became one of the earliest commuter suburbs. It remains an enduring achievement of architectural and residential planning. Southern Comfort details the magnificent architecture and planning of the Garden District. Through the histories of the developers, owners, architects, laborers, and craftspeople who shaped this district, the book creates a picture of a uniquely cosmopolitan city in the American South. This title, first published in 1989 and long unavailable, has been carefully updated by the author. It includes 90 new color photographs, showing the brightly painted facades for which this neighborhood is famous, domestic interiors that have never been published, and restoration efforts that have occurred in the past decade.

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