Catalogue


The rest is silence : death as annihilation in the English Renaissance /
Robert N. Watson.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1994.
description
xiv, 416 p. : ill.
ISBN
0520084942 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1994.
isbn
0520084942 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
987779
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Analytical and personal, this book appeals to its readers' emotions even as it engages their critical intelligence. It also breathes new life into some of the older, but still crucial, conventions of literary history."--Ronald Levao, author ofRenaissance Minds and Their Fictions "Loaded with fresh and sometimes startling insights, and it is bracingly skeptical of reigning New Historicist certainties about the hegemonic Christianity of the English Renaissance."--Christopher Hodgkins,George Herbert Journal
Flap Copy
"Analytical and personal, this book appeals to its readers' emotions even as it engages their critical intelligence. It also breathes new life into some of the older, but still crucial, conventions of literary history."--Ronald Levao, author of Renaissance Minds and Their Fictions "Loaded with fresh and sometimes startling insights, and it is bracingly skeptical of reigning New Historicist certainties about the hegemonic Christianity of the English Renaissance."--Christopher Hodgkins, George Herbert Journal
Summaries
Long Description
How did the fear of death coexist with the promise of Christian afterlife in the culture and literature of the English Renaissance? Robert Watson exposes a sharp edge of blasphemous protest against mortality that runs through revenge plays such asThe Spanish TragedyandHamlet, and through plays of procreation such asMeasure for MeasureandMacbeth. Tactics of denial appear in the vengefulness that John Donne directs toward female bodies for failing to bestow immortality, and in the promise of renewal that George Herbert sets against the threat of closure. Placing these literary manifestations in the context of specific Jacobean deathbed crises and modern cultural distortions, Watson explores the psychological roots and political consequences of denying that death permanently erases sensation and consciousness.
Main Description
How did the fear of death coexist with the promise of Christian afterlife in the culture and literature of the English Renaissance? Robert Watson exposes a sharp edge of blasphemous protest against mortality that runs through revenge plays such as The Spanish Tragedyand Hamlet, and through plays of procreation such as Measure for Measureand Macbeth. Tactics of denial appear in the vengefulness that John Donne directs toward female bodies for failing to bestow immortality, and in the promise of renewal that George Herbert sets against the threat of closure. Placing these literary manifestations in the context of specific Jacobean deathbed crises and modern cultural distortions, Watson explores the psychological roots and political consequences of denying that death permanently erases sensation and consciousness.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
A Note on Texts
Introductionp. 1
Religio Vindicis: Substitution and Immortality in The Spanish Tragedyp. 55
Giving Up the Ghost: Hamlet, Revenge, and Denialp. 74
Comic Means, Tragic Ends: False Immortality in Measure for Measurep. 103
Another Day, "Another Golgotha": Macbeth and the Tyranny of Naturep. 133
Duelling Death in the Lyrics of Love: John Donne's Poetics of Immortalityp. 156
Word Without End: The Comforts of George Herbert's Templep. 253
Epilogue: The Deaths of Two Womenp. 305
Retractionp. 322
Notesp. 325
Works Citedp. 395
Indexp. 409
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem