Catalogue


Attention and performance XVI [electronic resource] : information integration in perception and communication /
edited by Toshio Inui and James L. McClelland.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c1996.
description
[xix], 680 p. : ill., ports. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0262090333, 9780262090339
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c1996.
isbn
0262090333
9780262090339
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
"A Bradford book."
Based on papers presented at the Sixteenth International Symposium on Attention and Performance held at Kyoto Research Park, Kyoto, Japan, July 11-15, 1994.
catalogue key
9870568
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
The contributions to this volume, the sixteenth in the prestigious Attentionand Performance series, revisit the issue of modularity, the idea that many functions areindependently realized in specialized, autonomous modules. Although there is muchevidence of modularity in the brain, there is also reason to believe that the outcome of processing,across domains, depends on the synthesis of a wide range of constraining influences. The twenty-fourchapters in Attention and Performance XVI look at how these influences areintegrated in perception, attention, language comprehension, and motor control. They consider themechanisms of information integration in the brain; examine the status of the modularity hypothesisin light of efforts to understand how information integration can be successfully achieved; anddiscuss information integration from the viewpoints of psychophysics, physiology, and computationaltheory. A Bradford Book. Attention and Performanceseries.
Main Description
The contributions to this volume, the sixteenth in the prestigious Attention and Performance series, revisit the issue of modularity, the idea that many functions are independently realized in specialized, autonomous modules.Although there is much evidence of modularity in the brain, there is also reason to believe that the outcome of processing, across domains, depends on the synthesis of a wide range of constraining influences. The twenty-four chapters in Attention and Performance XVI look at how these influences are integrated in perception, attention, language comprehension, and motor control. They consider the mechanisms of information integration in the brain; examine the status of the modularity hypothesis in light of efforts to understand how information integration can be successfully achieved; and discuss information integration from the viewpoints of psychophysics, physiology, and computational theory.A Bradford Book. Attention and Performance series.
Main Description
The contributions to this volume, the sixteenth in the prestigious Attention and Performance series, revisit the issue of modularity, the idea that many functions are independently realized in specialized, autonomous modules. Although there is much evidence of modularity in the brain, there is also reason to believe that the outcome of processing, across domains, depends on the synthesis of a wide range of constraining influences. The twenty-four chapters in Attention and Performance XVI look at how these influences are integrated in perception, attention, language comprehension, and motor control. They consider the mechanisms of information integration in the brain; examine the status of the modularity hypothesis in light of efforts to understand how information integration can be successfully achieved; and discuss information integration from the viewpoints of psychophysics, physiology, and computational theory. A Bradford Book. Attention and Performance series.
Main Description
The contributions to this volume, the sixteenth in the prestigious Attention and Performance series, revisit the issue of modularity, the idea that many functions are independently realized in specialized, autonomous modules. Although there is much evidence of modularity in the brain, there is also reason to believe that the outcome of processing, across domains, depends on the synthesis of a wide range of constraining influences. The twenty-four chapters in Attention and Performance XVIlook at how these influences are integrated in perception, attention, language comprehension, and motor control. They consider the mechanisms of information integration in the brain; examine the status of the modularity hypothesis in light of efforts to understand how information integration can be successfully achieved; and discuss information integration from the viewpoints of psychophysics, physiology, and computational theory. A Bradford Book. Attention and Performance series.
Table of Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
Participants
Group Photo
Introduction
Mechanisms of Information Integration in the Brain
Association Lecture
Object Tokens, Attention, and Visual Memory
Integration in Perception of Visual Structure
A Bayesian Framework for the Integration of Visual Modules
Stereo and Texture Cue Integration in the Perception of Planar and Curved Large Real Surfaces
An Architecture for Rapid, Hierarchical Structural Description
Integration over Fixations in Vision
Integration and Accumulation of Information across Saccadic Eye Movements
A Neurophysiological Distinction between Attention and Intention
Multimodal Integration for Representation of Space
Multiple Pathways for Processing Visual Space
Multimodal Spatial Constraints on Tactile Selective Attention
Multimodal Spatial Attention Visualized by Motion Illusion
Haptic and Visual Representations of Space
Integration for Motor Control
Are Proprioceptive Sensory Inputs Combined into a "Gestalt"?
Integration of Extrinsic and Motor Space
Bidirectional Theory Approach to Integration
One Visual Experience, Many Visual Systems
Integration in Language
Integration of Multiple Sources of Information in Language Processing
Representation and Activation in Syntactic Processing
Using Eye Movements to Study Spoken Language Comprehension: Evidence for Visually Mediated Incremental Interpretation
Accounting for Parsing Principles: From Parsing Preferences to Language Acquisition
The Potentials for Basic Sentence Processing: Differentiating Integrative Processes
Attention
Cooperating Brain Systems in Selective Perception and Action
Different Patterns of Popout for Direction of Motion and Orientation
Vision, Attention, and Action: Inhibition and Facilitation in Sensory-Motor Links Revealed by the Reaction Time and the Line Motion
Discussion
Integration of Information: Reflections on the Theme of Attention and Performance XVI
Author Index
Subject Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem