Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Archaeology and created memory [electronic resource] : public history in a national park /
Paul A. Shackel.
imprint
New York : Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, c2000.
description
xxii, 191 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0306461773
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, c2000.
isbn
0306461773
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
9836124
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 173-188) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-05-01:
How history traditionally gets presented to the public is the product of political, social, and ideological factors. As a result, certain histories, or more precisely, perspectives on those histories, go untold. The town of Harpers Ferry, Virginia (now West Virginia), played a central role in the Civil War, being the site of John Brown's raid on the arsenal in an effort to arm newly freed slaves. Shackel's point is that the town, although devastated by the war, did not stop functioning after 1865. However, this is what the National Park Service (NPS), which administers the historical site, would have one believe. Much like it had been done at other national sites--the NPS emphasized a policy of restoring the built landscape to a particular period of perceived importance. In the case of Harpers Ferry, that period was the Civil War era, despite architectural and archaeological evidence that the town thrived in Victorian times. Anyone with an interest in the Civil War and how it ha s been retold will find this book of interest; a background in archaeology is unnecessary. The volume is well illustrated, and a thorough references section provides additional sources of information. All levels. M. J. O'Brien University of Missouri--Columbia
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Anyone with an interest in the Civil War and how it has been retold will find this book of interest; a background in archaeology is unnecessary. The volume is well illustrated, and a thorough references section provides additional sources of information.' Choice, May 2001 '...Archaeology and Created Memory is full of archaeolgical data recovered from a samll industrial community and therefore inherently appeals to industrial archaeologists, especially those interested in military history and postmodern data applications. ...presents the reader with historical background and archaeological data from three different areas...that challenge the traditionally presented history of Harpers Ferry, especially by the NPS. ...the reader can gain nice insights into alternative interpretations of the past through the use of archaeology.' Industrial Archaeology, 27:2 (2001)
' Anyone with an interest in the Civil War and how it has been retold will find this book of interest; a background in archaeology is unnecessary. The volume is well illustrated, and a thorough references section provides additional sources of information. ' Choice, May 2001 ' ... Archaeology and Created Memory is full of archaeolgical data recovered from a samll industrial community and therefore inherently appeals to industrial archaeologists, especially those interested in military history and postmodern data applications. ...presents the reader with historical background and archaeological data from three different areas...that challenge the traditionally presented history of Harpers Ferry, especially by the NPS. ...the reader can gain nice insights into alternative interpretations of the past through the use of archaeology. ' Industrial Archaeology, 27:2 (2001)
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Archaeology can either bolster memory and tradition, or contradict the status quo and provide an alternative view of the past. An archaeology of Harpers Ferry's wartime and Victorian eras confronts time-honored historical interpretations of the past (created and perpetuated by such interest groups as historians and the National Park Service) and in so doing allows us to be more inclusive of the town's forgotten histories and provides alternative voices to a past.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Harpers Ferry: A Place in Timep. 1
A Brief Historyp. 1
Reinventing Harpers Ferry's Historyp. 5
Reclaiming Harpers Ferry's Historyp. 7
Archaeology Supporting the Mythp. 9
Archaeology and Overturning Local Mythp. 11
Occupied Harpers Ferry During the Civil War
"All About Us Was the Wreckage of the Fighting": Harpers Ferry During the Warp. 17
Introductionp. 17
The Effects of War on Domestic Life in Harpers Ferryp. 17
Revitalization of Occupied Harpers Ferryp. 29
"A Village of Paupers": An Archaeology of Occupied Harpers Ferryp. 35
Beyond Great Menp. 35
Campgrounds on the Heightsp. 35
Mrs. Stipes' Boardinghouse: The Archaeological Recordp. 38
Harpers Ferry during Sheridan's Shenandoah Campaignp. 43
Shanty Kitchensp. 43
Military Surgery on a Domestic Sitep. 45
Landscape and Civil War Ruinsp. 47
Public Memoryp. 52
Rebuilding Harpers Ferry After the War
"The Place Never Will Be Anything Again": Lower Town Harpers Ferry and Victorian Americap. 53
An 1865 Ethnographic Account of Harpers Ferryp. 53
National Reconstructionp. 56
Racial Tensions and Black Activismp. 57
Harpers Ferry's Redevelopmentp. 64
Health, Sanitation, and Tourism in Harpers Ferryp. 66
Tourism in Harpers Ferryp. 68
The Eventual Demise of Harpers Ferryp. 70
"The Handsomest House in Two Towns": Urban Development of an Elite Household in Harpers Ferryp. 75
Backgroundp. 75
Early Postbellum Use of an Urban Lotp. 76
Hurst Occupation: 1884-1920p. 77
The Hurst Householdp. 77
Interaction Within the Harpers Ferry Communityp. 78
An Archaeology of the Hurst Familyp. 80
Health Conditions among the Hurst Familyp. 80
Ritualized Dining among the Hurst Familyp. 85
Conclusionp. 97
"The Natural Limits of Human Endurance": Brewery Workers, Bottlers, and Labor Unrestp. 99
Brewing and Bottlingp. 99
Bottling Technology and a Division of Laborp. 100
An Archaeology of the Industrial Erap. 101
The Development of the McGraw Commercial Lotp. 104
The Harpers Ferry Brewery and Bottling Workersp. 108
Temperance and the End of Brewing in Harpers Ferryp. 111
Making a Conscious Choicep. 112
"A Miserable Mockery of a Home": Boardinghouse Life in the Lower Townp. 115
Introductionp. 115
Boardinghouse Lifep. 116
Domestic Reform Movementp. 119
The McGraw Boardinghousep. 126
A Profile of Boardinghouse Life in Harpers Ferryp. 127
Health Conditions in the McGraw Boardinghousep. 130
Boardinghouse Mealsp. 135
The Table Settingp. 135
Fruits and Vegetables Consumed in the Boardinghousep. 139
Meats Consumed in the Boardinghousep. 139
Post-McGraw Use of the Boardinghousep. 145
The Assassination of Plurality: Material Wealth and Consumption in Victorian Harpers Ferryp. 149
Remembering Harpers Ferryp. 149
The Assassination of Pluralityp. 150
Why Rules of Etiquette?p. 154
The Art of Doing Withoutp. 157
Consumption Patterns: Entrepreneurs and Boarders in Victorian Harpers Ferryp. 159
Health, Sanitation, and Tourismp. 162
Sanitation Reform in Harpers Ferryp. 162
Comparative Health in Harpers Ferryp. 166
Prospects for an Archaeology of a People Without Historyp. 169
Remaking Harpers Ferry's Historyp. 171
Referencesp. 173
Indexp. 189
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem