Catalogue


Sharia and the making of the modern Egyptian : Islamic law and custom in the courts of Ottoman Cairo /
Reem A. Meshal.
imprint
Cairo ; New York : American University in Cairo Press, 2014.
description
xi, 290 pages ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9774166175, 9789774166174
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cairo ; New York : American University in Cairo Press, 2014.
isbn
9774166175
9789774166174
contents note
The empire in theory -- Custom in Shari'a and in the Siyasati-i ilahi (divine Siyasa) -- The construction of orthodoxy : renewal (Tajdid) and renunciation (Takfir) -- "This Sijill is a Hujja!" mass producing documents in Ottoman Cairo -- The documented life -- The rights of God (Huquq Allah) : "a moral transgression but not a crime" -- The rights of humans (Huquq al-Adamiyyin).
catalogue key
9835441
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 269-286) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
In this book, the author examines sijills, the official documents of the Ottoman Islamic courts, to understand how sharia law, society and the early-modern economy of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Ottoman Cairo related to the practice of custom in determining rulings. In the sixteenth century, a new legal and cultural orthodoxy fostered the development of an early-modern Islam that broke new ground, giving rise to a new concept of the citizen and his role. Contrary to the prevailing scholarly view, this work adopts the position that local custom began to diminish and decline as a source of authority. These issues resonate today, several centuries later, in the continuing discussions of individual rights in relation to Islamic law.
Main Description
In this book, the author examines sijills, the official documents of the Ottoman Islamic courts, to understand how sharia law, society and the early-modern economy of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Ottoman Cairo related to the pratice of custom in determining rulings. In the sixteenth century, a new legal and cultural orthodoxy fostered the development of an early-modern Islam that broke new ground, giving rise to a new concept of the citizen and his role. Contrary to the prevailing scholarly view, this work adopts the position that local custom began to diminish and decline as a source of authority. These issues resonate today, several centuries later, in the continuing discussions of individual rights in relation to Islamic law.

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