Catalogue


Water resources sector strategy [electronic resource] : strategic directions for World Bank engagement.
imprint
Washington, DC : World Bank, 2004.
description
vi, 78 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
ISBN
0821356976
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Washington, DC : World Bank, 2004.
isbn
0821356976
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
9834216
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, June 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
Many developing countries face daunting water resources challenges as the needs for water supply, irrigation, and hydroelectricity grow; as water becomes more scarce, quality declines, and environmental and social concerns increase; and as the threats posed by goods and droughts are exacerbated by climate change. As a consequence, there is a high and increasing demand for World Bank engagement. Lending for water resources and development accounted for about 16 percent of all World Bank lending over the past decade.Within the World Bank, business strategies for specific water-using sectors, such as water and sanitation, irrigation and drainage, and hydropower, are determined primarily as part of the strategies for these sectors. Water Resources Sector Strategy: Strategic Directions for World Bank Engagement focuses on how to improve the development and management of water resources while providing the principles that link resource management to the specific water-using sectors.The Strategy emphasizes the difficult and contentious issues upon which World Bank practice needs to improve and suggests that the main management challenge is not a vision of integrated water resources management but a pragmatic but principled approach.
Main Description
This paper focuses on how to improve the development and management of water resources while providing the principles that link resource management to the specific water-using sectors. In 1993 the Board of the World Bank endorsed a Water Resources Management Policy Paper. In that paper, and this Strategy, water resources management is seen to comprise the institutional framework; management instruments; and the development, maintenance and operation of infrastructure. The paper looks at the dynamics of water and development. It builds on the 1993 policy paper, evaluating current scenarios and looking at future options and their implications both for government policy and the World Bank.
Unpaid Annotation
Focusing on how to improve the development and management of water resources, this title provides principles that link resource management to the specific water-using sectors. The Strategy emphasizes the difficult and contentious issues upon which World Bank practice needs to improve and suggests that the main management challenge is not a vision of integrated water resources management but a "pragmatic but principled" approach.
Long Description
Many developing countries face daunting water resources challenges as the needs for water supply, irrigation, and hydroelectricity grow; as water becomes more scarce, quality declines, and environmental and social concerns increase; and as the threats posed by goods and droughts are exacerbated by climate change. As a consequence, there is a high and increasing demand for World Bank engagement. Lending for water resources and development accounted for about 16 percent of all World Bank lending over the past decade. Within the World Bank, business strategies for specific water-using sectors, such as water and sanitation, irrigation and drainage, and hydropower, are determined primarily as part of the strategies for these sectors. Water Resources Sector Strategy: Strategic Directions for World Bank Engagement focuses on how to improve the development and management of water resources while providing the principles that link resource management to the specific water-using sectors. The Strategy emphasizes the difficult and contentious issues upon which World Bank practice needs to improve and suggests that the main management challenge is not a vision of integrated water resources management but a A"pragmatic but principledA? approach.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Overview and executive summaryp. 1
Introduction and development contextp. 5
Stocktaking and evaluationp. 28
Strategic options and possible business implicationsp. 41
What the Strategy might mean for World Bank engagement: Some examples from the regionsp. 53
Abbreviationsp. 74
The World Bank position on the Report of the World Commission on Damsp. 75
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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