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The classics and colonial India [electronic resource] /
Phiroze Vasunia.
edition
First edition.
imprint
Oxford, United Kingdom : Oxford University Press, 2013.
description
xii, 398 pages, [4] pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199203237 (hardback), 9780199203239 (hardback
format(s)
Book
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
Oxford, United Kingdom : Oxford University Press, 2013.
isbn
0199203237 (hardback)
9780199203239 (hardback
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
9823070
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 351-382) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This book discusses intriguing analogies between physical and economical phenomena. In fact, methodologies borrowed from physics were crucial for the development of economical models in the past, e.g. non-equilibrium statistical physics opened the gate for the financial derivative pricing. The book may catalyze a broader discussion among economists and physicists about roots of the current economical crisis and ways the global economy should be stabilized."
This is a gold-mine of a book, that treats a fascinating subject with all the intelligent imagination, based on exhaustive research, that it so richly deserves.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Offering a unique cross-cultural study, this text provides a detailed account of the relationship between classical antiquity and the British colonial presence in India. Vasunia shows how classical culture pervaded the minds of the British colonizers, and highlights the many Indian receptions of Greco-Roman antiquity.
Long Description
This extraordinary book provides a detailed account of the relationship between classical antiquity and the British colonial presence in India. It examines some of the great figures of the colonial period such as Gandhi, Nehru, Macaulay, Jowett, and William Jones, and covers a range of different disciplines as it sweeps from the eighteenth century to the end of the British Raj in the twentieth. Using a variety of materials, including archival documents and familiar texts, Vasunia shows how classical culture pervaded the thoughts and minds of the British colonizers. His book highlights the many Indian receptions of Greco-Roman antiquity and analyses how Indians turned to ancient Greece and Rome during the colonial period for a variety of purposes, including anti-colonialism, nationalism, and collaboration. Offering a unique cross-cultural study, this volume will be of interest to literary scholars and historians of the classical world, the British Empire, and South Asia.
Main Description
This book provides a detailed account of the relationship between classical antiquity and the British colonial presence in India. Vasunia highlights the many Indian receptions of Greco-Roman antiquity and shows how classical culture pervaded the thoughts and minds of the British colonizers. It analyses how Indians turned to ancient Greece and Rome during the colonial period for a variety of purposes, including anti-colonialism, nationalism, and collaboration, andexamines some of the great figures of the colonial period such as Gandhi, Nehru, Macaulay, Jowett, and William Jones.
Main Description
This extraordinary book provides a detailed account of the relationship between classical antiquity and the British colonial presence in India. It examines some of the great figures of the colonial period such as Gandhi, Nehru, Macaulay, Jowett, and William Jones, and covers a range ofdifferent disciplines as it sweeps from the eighteenth century to the end of the British Raj in the twentieth. Using a variety of materials, including archival documents and familiar texts, Vasunia shows how classical culture pervaded the thoughts and minds of the British colonizers. His book highlights the many Indian receptions of Greco-Roman antiquity and analyses how Indians turned to ancient Greece andRome during the colonial period for a variety of purposes, including anti-colonialism, nationalism, and collaboration. Offering a unique cross-cultural study, this volume will be of interest to literary scholars and historians of the classical world, the British Empire, and South Asia.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. xiii
List of Platesp. xiv
Introductionp. 1
Alexander in India
Dreams of Alexanderp. 33
Two Visions of Empire: Droysen and Grotep. 36
Geographies of Conquestp. 51
In the Footsteps of Alexanderp. 67
Kafiristanp. 77
Sikandar and the History of Indiap. 91
Writing the History of Indiap. 91
From Alexander to Sikandarp. 103
Caesar in Peccavistan
Greater Rome and Greater Britainp. 119
De imperiisp. 121
Charles Dilke and John Seeleyp. 131
Rome and the Empirep. 140
A 'Natural' Comparisonp. 150
Visions of Antiquity: Architecture and the Classical Stylep. 157
Tropical Classicalp. 158
Theorizing Colonial Architecturep. 176
Competition-wallahs: Greek, Latin, and the Indian Civil Servicep. 193
The East India Company's Training College at Haileyburyp. 196
The Mid-Century Reformp. 203
The Open Competitionp. 207
Oxford, Greats, and the ICSp. 216
Indians and the Open Competitionp. 223
Conclusionp. 228
Appendix: The Examinationsp. 231
Co-Operation and Liberation
Homer and Virgilp. 239
Homer in Indiap. 239
Virgil in Late Eighteenth-Century Britainp. 252
Virgil in Nineteenth-Century Britainp. 264
History in the Future Tensep. 275
Aristophanes' Wealth and Dalpatram's Lakshmip. 279
A Gujarati Translation of Aristophanesp. 279
The Context of Colonial Gujaratp. 290
Athens in Calcutta: Derozio, Dutt, and the Bengal Renaissancep. 301
Henry Louis Vivian Deroziop. 301
Michael Madhusudan Duttp. 316
Athens in Calcuttap. 328
Epilogue: Gandhi, Nehru, Socratesp. 335
Bibliographyp. 351
Indexp. 383
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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