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Not much left [electronic resource] : the fate of liberalism in America /
Tom Waldman.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, 2008.
description
xi, 272 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780520247703 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, 2008.
isbn
9780520247703 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
9763227
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Tom Waldman's book is extremely interesting and gives us a lot to think about, particularly at this moment in our nation's history."--Congressman Henry A. Waxman
Flap Copy
"Tom Waldman's book is extremely interesting and gives us a lot to think about, particularly at this moment in our nation's history."--Congressman Henry A. Waxman "Tom Waldman's Not Much Left is a sweeping analysis of the demise of American liberalism over the past 40 years, written with clarity, great insight, and admirable research."--Joe Domanick, author of Cruel Justice: Three Strikes and the Politics of Crime in America's Golden State
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Waldman's book is fascinating."
"Waldman's book is fascinating."-- Internet Review of Books
"Waldman's cogent historical-political analysis is sure to engage election junkies of any political persuasion."
"Waldman's cogent historical-political analysis is sure to engage election junkies of any political persuasion."--Publishers Weekly
"Waldman's cogent historical-political analysis is sure to engage election junkies of any political persuasion."-- Publishers Weekly
This item was reviewed in:
PW Annex Reviews, May 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Tom Waldman's lively and sweeping assessment of the state of American liberalism begins with the political turbulence of 1968 and culminates with the 2006 takeover of Congress by the Democratic Party. "Not Much Left: The Fate of Liberalism in America "vividly demonstrates how the progressive and liberal wing of the Democratic Party helped end a war, won the civil rights battle, and paved the way for blacks, women, gays, and other minorities to achieve full citizenship. Through reportage, anecdotes, and analysis--particularly of the disastrous defeat of Democrat George McGovern in 1972--Waldman chronicles how the grand coalition that achieved so much in the 1960s began to self-destruct in the early 1970s. Citing the Republican recovery from Barry Goldwater's 1964 defeat, Waldman demonstrates how the two parties' very different reactions to electoral debacle account for recent Republican dominance and Democratic impotence. Assessing liberalism's fate through the Carter and Reagan presidencies, the defeat of Michael Dukakis in the 1988 presidential election, and the on-again, off-again liberalism of the Clinton years, Waldman then brings the discussion up to date with analysis of the 2008 presidential campaign.
Main Description
Tom Waldman's lively and sweeping assessment of the state of American liberalism begins with the political turbulence of 1968 and culminates with the 2006 takeover of Congress by the Democratic Party.Not Much Left: The Fate of Liberalism in Americavividly demonstrates how the progressive and liberal wing of the Democratic Party helped end a war, won the civil rights battle, and paved the way for blacks, women, gays, and other minorities to achieve full citizenship. Through reportage, anecdotes, and analysis--particularly of the disastrous defeat of Democrat George McGovern in 1972--Waldman chronicles how the grand coalition that achieved so much in the 1960s began to self-destruct in the early 1970s. Citing the Republican recovery from Barry Goldwater's 1964 defeat, Waldman demonstrates how the two parties' very different reactions to electoral debacle account for recent Republican dominance and Democratic impotence. Assessing liberalism's fate through the Carter and Reagan presidencies, the defeat of Michael Dukakis in the 1988 presidential election, and the on-again, off-again liberalism of the Clinton years, Waldman then brings the discussion up to date with analysis of the 2008 presidential campaign.
Main Description
Tom Waldman's lively and sweeping assessment of the state of American liberalism begins with the political turbulence of 1968 and culminates with the 2006 takeover of Congress by the Democratic Party. Not Much Left: The Fate of Liberalism in America vividly demonstrates how the progressive and liberal wing of the Democratic Party helped end a war, won the civil rights battle, and paved the way for blacks, women, gays, and other minorities to achieve full citizenship. Through reportage, anecdotes, and analysis--particularly of the disastrous defeat of Democrat George McGovern in 1972--Waldman chronicles how the grand coalition that achieved so much in the 1960s began to self-destruct in the early 1970s. Citing the Republican recovery from Barry Goldwater's 1964 defeat, Waldman demonstrates how the two parties' very different reactions to electoral debacle account for recent Republican dominance and Democratic impotence. Assessing liberalism's fate through the Carter and Reagan presidencies, the defeat of Michael Dukakis in the 1988 presidential election, and the on-again, off-again liberalism of the Clinton years, Waldman then brings the discussion up to date with analysis of the 2008 presidential campaign.
Main Description
Tom Waldman's lively and sweeping assessment of the state of American liberalism spans the political turbulence of 1968 and culminates with the 2006 takeover of Congress by the Democratic Party.Not Much Left: The Fate of Liberalism in Americavividly demonstrates how the progressive/liberal wing of the Democratic Party helped end a war, won the civil rights battle, and paved the way for blacks, women, gays, and other minorities to achieve full citizenship. Using reportage, anecdotes, and analysis-in particular the disastrous defeat of Democrat George McGovern in 1972-Waldman chronicles how the grand coalition that achieved so much in the 1960s began to self-destruct in the early '70s. Citing the Republican recovery from Barry Goldwater's 1964 defeat, Waldman demonstrates how the two parties' very different reactions to electoral debacle account for recent Republican dominance and Democratic impotence. Assessing liberalism's fate through the Carter and Reagan presidencies, the defeat of Michael Dukakis in the 1988 presidential election, and the on-again, off-again liberalism of the Clinton years,Not Much Leftshows how popular culture both sustains liberal positions and attitudes across society and then serves later as a surprising and potent ally for conservatives seeking to expand their base. Is liberalism on the resurgence? Waldman brings the discussion up to date with the 2008 presidential campaign.
Table of Contents
Quiet Americansp. 1
In Locke's Stepp. 18
Which Way Did the '60s Go?p. 37
Unhappy Togetherp. 50
1968 in Americap. 60
Curious about Georgep. 71
Modern Timesp. 94
I Am Woman, Say It Loudp. 113
Sexual Positionsp. 118
Out of Timep. 135
Yesterday's Gonep. 159
Pulling to the Rightp. 177
Blue Culture, Red Politicsp. 195
Coming Home?p. 210
Epilogue: Who Are You?p. 232
Notesp. 239
Suggested Readingp. 247
Indexp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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