Catalogue


Marlborough's America [electronic resource] /
Stephen Saunders Webb.
imprint
New Haven ; London : Yale University Press, c2013.
description
xxiii, 579 p., [44] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9780300178593 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New Haven ; London : Yale University Press, c2013.
isbn
9780300178593 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
9762785
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [415]-553) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-06-01:
Marlborough's America, the fourth volume of Webb's Governors-General series (vol. 1, The Governors-General, CH, Jul'80; vol. 2, 1676, CH, Oct'84; vol. 3, Lord Churchill's Coup, 1995), traces connections rarely made, illustrating how the events and actors of British politics strongly affected Britain's colonies. The Restoration, the Glorious Revolution, the wars against Louis XIV, and Britain's relations with the other European powers all influenced Colonial development and governance. Foremost among the personalities who had a profound and lasting influence on the American colonies was John Churchill, Duke of Marlborough. The invincible general of the wars against France, Marlborough also had intimate, though turbulent, personal connections with three monarchs of England. Often at the pinnacle of events in Britain, the captain general of the allied armies shaped the colonies through the nomination of career army officers to governing positions there, trained to war and politics under his own tutelage. Exhaustively researched, the book covers the duke's remarkable military exploits in Europe while tracking the careers of the men who served with him as they carried his plans and purposes to the New World. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Most levels/libraries. J. D. Lyons Ashland University
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2012-11-05:
This brilliant, unconventional work from Syracuse University historian Webb is the capstone of his 50 years in the making, four-volume history of the governance of Britain's 17th- and 18th-century empire (The Governors-General). Its argument? Rather than overlooking its overseas colonies through "salutary neglect," Britain governed them with a firm military-political hand. At the center of the story is the duke of Marlborough, captain general of the realm and hero of Britain's early 18th-century continental victories over France. By the 1720s, Marlborough's veteran aides and lieutenants had fanned out across the western hemisphere, displaced France in America, and restructured the colonies they came to govern with their patron's "complex corporate, militant imperial vision." It was these men who formed "the bridge between Marlborough's America and Washington's America"-in fact, George Washington makes an appearance at the end as a legatee of Marlborough's towering influence; both the great leader of the American Revolution and the new nation itself, argues Webb, are Marlborough's offspring. Such old-style history will not appeal to everyone, and Webb's sometimes mannered prose and surfeit of details are not for the fainthearted. But there's no denying the importance of this book or its likely appeal to readers interested in British, imperial, military, classic, top-down history. 11 color, 25 b&w illus., 3 maps. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[Webb] presents a splendid panorama of events on both sides of the Atlantic during a crucial era. . . . The result is a signal contribution to our understanding of the making and workings of early 18th-century empire."Richard Johnson, University of Washington
"[A] brilliant, unconventional work . . . there's no denying the importance of this book or its likely appeal to readers interested in British, imperial, military, classic, top-down history."- Publishers Weekly
"[A] brilliant, unconventional work . . . there's no denying the importance of this book or its likely appeal to readers interested in British, imperial, military, classic, top-down history."-- Publishers Weekly
"Masterful . . . Stephen Saunders Webb has made us see a great man in an even greater light." Thomas Donnelly, Weekly Standard
"Readers will be surprised to learn just how much of our early history was shaped by none other than the great ancestor of Winston Churchill, the Duke of Marlborough, in a work that wears its erudition lightly, but illuminates yet another way in which the Atlantic Ocean was more bridge than barrier between the Old World and the New. Webb weaves a compelling account of the relationships between 18th-century strategy, patronage, and colonial politics. And he does so with a shrewd eye and sardonic wit."--Eliot A. Cohen, author of Conquered into Liberty: Two Centuries of Battles along the Great Warpath that Made the American Way of War
"Readers will be surprised to learn just how much of our early history was shaped by none other than the great ancestor of Winston Churchill, the Duke of Marlborough, in a work that wears its erudition lightly, but illuminates yet another way in which the Atlantic Ocean was more bridge than barrier between the Old World and the New. Webb weaves a compelling account of the relationships between 18th-century strategy, patronage, and colonial politics. And he does so with a shrewd eye and sardonic wit."-Eliot A. Cohen, author of Conquered into Liberty: Two Centuries of Battles along the Great Warpath that Made the American Way of War
"This is an extremely well-researched, well-written and iconoclastic book that makes an important, if controversial argument. . . . This book is a monument to scholarship."Steve Pincus, Yale University
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, November 2012
Choice, June 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Scholars of British America generally conclude that the early eighteenth-century Anglo-American empire was commercial in economics, liberal in politics, and parochial in policy, somnambulant in an era of "salutary neglect," but Stephen Saunders Webb here demonstrates that the American provinces, under the spur of war, became capitalist, coercive, and aggressive, owing to the vigorous leadership of career army officers, trained and nominated to American government by the captain general of the allied armies, the first duke of Marlborough, and that his influence, and that of his legates, prevailed through the entire century in America. Webbs work follows the duke, whom an eloquent enemy described as "the greatest statesman and the greatest general that this country or any other country has produced," his staff and soldiers, through the ten campaigns, which, by defanging France, made the union with Scotland possible and made "Great Britain" preeminent in the Atlantic world. Then Webb demonstrates that the dukes legates transformed American colonies into provinces of empire. "Marlboroughs America," fifty years in the making, is the fourth volume of "The Governors-General."
Main Description
Scholars of British America generally conclude that the early eighteenth-century Anglo-American empire was commercial in economics, liberal in politics, and parochial in policy, somnambulant in an era of "salutary neglect," but Stephen Saunders Webb here demonstrates that the American provinces, under the spur of war, became capitalist, coercive, and aggressive, owing to the vigorous leadership of career army officers, trained and nominated to American government by the captain general of the allied armies, the first duke of Marlborough, and that his influence, and that of his legates, prevailed through the entire century in America. Webb's work follows the duke, whom an eloquent enemy described as "the greatest statesman and the greatest general that this country or any other country has produced," his staff and soldiers, through the ten campaigns, which, by defanging France, made the union with Scotland possible and made "Great Britain" preeminent in the Atlantic world. Then Webb demonstrates that the duke's legates transformed American colonies into provinces of empire. Marlborough's America , fifty years in the making, is the fourth volume of The Governors-General .
Bowker Data Service Summary
Scholars of British America generally conclude that the early 18th-century Anglo-American empire was commercial in economics, liberal in politics, and parochial in policy, somnambulant in an era of 'salutary neglect', but, in this book, Stephen Saunders Webb demonstrates that the American provinces, under the spur of war, became capitalist, coercive, and aggresive.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. viii
Preface: Army and Empirep. xi
Envoy: "The Sunshine Day"p. 1
Winning America in Europe: Précis
Grand Designsp. 30
The March to the Danubep. 58
Blenheimp. 76
Greater Britainp. 100
Ramillies and Unionp. 123
"The Endless War": Précis
Oudenardep. 162
Malplaquetp. 185
The Duke's Declinep. 212
Quebec and Bouchainp. 227
Marlborough's America: Préis
The Dreadful Death of Daniel Parkep. 267
Defending the Revolution: Robert Hunter in New Yorkp. 291
Alexander Spotswood: Architect of Empirep. 330
Epilogue: The "Golden Adventure"p. 371
Notesp. 415
Acknowledgmentsp. 555
Indexp. 559
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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