Catalogue


Programmed to be fat? [videorecording].
edition
Widescreen.
imprint
[North Vancouver, B.C.] : Dreamfilm Productions 2012 ; [Toronto, Ont.] : CBC learning [distributor]
description
1 videodisc (ca. 45 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
format(s)
DVD
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
[North Vancouver, B.C.] : Dreamfilm Productions 2012 ; [Toronto, Ont.] : CBC learning [distributor]
publisher #
ZZY-11-14
contents note
Introduction -- I was a chubby kid -- Environmental chemicals -- Obesity research.
credits note
Director, Bruce Mohun ; written by Bruce Mohun, Helen Slinger ; produced by Sue Ridout, Helen Slinger, and Sara Darling ; editor, Tim Wanlin ; director of photography, John Collins.
general note
Originally broadcast on the CBC series The Nature of things on January 12, 2012.
Produced by Dreamfilm Productions in association with Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
performer
Host/narrator, David Suzuki ; featuring interviews with: Bruce Blumberg (biologist), Paula Baillie-Hamilton, Alison Holloway, Fred Vom Saal (endocrinologist), Retha Newbold (developmental reproductive biologist), Jerry Heindel, John Challis, Juliette Legler ... [et al.]
abstract
"What if we are being programmed from birth to be fatter than we should be? That question is at the heart of new research into endocrine-disrupting chemicals, chemicals that may be contributing to the obesity epidemic. Over the past three decades, the developed world has become increasingly overweight, even after years of struggling to eat less and exercise more. Some scientists began to wonder whether there was another reason besides calories-in-calories-out, particularly when they noticed that lab animals used in experiments with chemicals were putting on weight. [The program] explores controversial new science that suggests exposure to man-made chemicals, starting in the womb, may be triggering changes to our metabolism that result in life-long weight gain."--Container.
language note
Closed captioned.
catalogue key
9758219
technical details
DVD.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem