Catalogue


Private means--public ends : private business in social service delivery /
edited by Barry J. Carroll, Ralph W. Conant, Thomas A. Easton.
imprint
New York : Praeger, 1987.
description
xiii, 187 p.
ISBN
0275924297 (alk. paper) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Praeger, 1987.
isbn
0275924297 (alk. paper) :
catalogue key
973702
 
Includes bibliographies and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1987-05:
The editors address the burgeoning issue of privatization via a series of 11 essays. Topics range from general comments on privatization to specific recommendations pertaining to services currently provided by the public sector. The editors identify education as the highest domestic priority and make it the central focus of the book. The theme of the book is that the task of improving the educational system appears to be too complex and too expensive to be left entirely to the public sector; the business community is identified as possessing the capacity to assist the public sector in solving this problem. The contributors also discuss the potential role of the business community in other service areas such as health care, corrections, employment, research and development, and day care. Contributors assert that the problem-solving methods of business represent productive alternatives to the welfare state that merely redistributes rather than creates income. This book would be especially of interest to upper-division and graduate students of business, political science, and public administration.-E. Garaventa, College of Staten Island, CUNY
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 1987
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Summaries
Main Description
This book is a timely response to the current U.S. crisis in public funding. Offering a new philosophy of public service that defies the old categories of conservative and liberal, this practical book shows how the problem-solving abilities and profit-making discipline of the business community can make it a productive alternative for meeting public needs.
Long Description
This book is a timely response to the current U.S. crisis in public funding. Offering a new philosophy of public service that defies the old categories of conservative and liberal, this practical book shows how the problem-solving abilities and profit-making discipline of the business community can make it a productive alternative for meeting public needs. Using education as an example of what should be a high domestic priority, the authors argue that business should recognize that it has a major stake in the quality of the product of our schools and should provide support. The book delineates other areas of national concern that merit the attention of American business. It concludes with an insightful discussion of how business involvement might be reinforced by incentive systems.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Introductionp. ix
Business Goals and Social Goalsp. 1
Referencesp. 7
Communicating National Priorities to Businessp. 8
Referencesp. 19
Motivating the Private Sector: What Role for Public Policy?p. 20
Referencesp. 36
The Entrepreneurial Approach to Privatizationp. 37
Referencesp. 48
Privatizing the Acute Care General Hospitalp. 50
Referencesp. 73
The Privatization of Prisons: Panacea or Placebo?p. 76
Referencesp. 96
The Realities of "Profitization" and Privatization in the Nonprofit Sectorp. 98
Notesp. 116
Referencesp. 117
Strategic Marketing of Social Servicesp. 119
Privatization: A Game-Theoretic Analysisp. 135
Referencesp. 145
Privatization: Carnage, Chaos, and Corruptionp. 146
Referencesp. 169
Privatization in Perspectivep. 171
Indexp. 179
About the Contributorsp. 189
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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