Catalogue


Margaret Atwood's fairy-tale sexual politics [electronic resource] /
Sharon Rose Wilson.
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c1993.
description
xviii, 430 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0878056394 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c1993.
isbn
0878056394 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
9547807
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [390]-409) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Intriguing investigation of fairy-tale images in Atwood's haunting fiction, poetry, and artwork
Flap Copy
Intriguing investigation of fairy-tale images in AtwoodÂ's haunting fiction, poetry, and artwork
Flap Copy
Intriguing investigation of fairy-tale images in AtwoodÂ’s haunting fiction, poetry, and artwork
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-07:
Wilson's study analyzes Atwood's novels from The Edible Woman (1969) through Cat's Eye (1988), volumes of her poetry, and her visual art, often designed as book covers or illustrations. Although Wilson's title refers to "fairy-tale sexual politics," Wilson's main point on sexual politics is that Atwood's victims of violence are usually women. (J. Brooks Bouson in her recent Brutal Choreographies, CH, May'94, deals more centrally with sexual politics in Atwood's fiction.) However, crucial to Wilson's thesis is the assertion that fairy tales do not limit gender roles and that Atwood often subverts the literary fairy tales to reveal contemporary problems. Wilson's primary insight is that several of Atwood's works make explicit fairy-tale references and that these tales function as intertexts in all of Atwood's novels and in several of her poems. According to Wilson, Atwood's characteristic pattern moves from the dismemberment of her characters to their metamorphoses and healing. The main fairy tales discussed are "The Robber Bridegroom," "The Red Shoes," "Fitcher's Bird," and "Little Red Cap," although Wilson mentions hosts of allusions to other tales or parallel motifs from them. Appropriate for graduate students or faculty researching the use of fairy tales by Atwood. K. Begnal; Utah State University
Appeared in Library Journal on 1993-12-01:
This critical study illustrates how Canadian author Atwood's work incorporates the use of fairy tales, especially those of Grimm and Andersen, to depict themes of sexual politics. Wilson (English, Univ. of Northern Colorado) offers a careful analysis of Atwood's fiction and poetry in relation to specific tales, e.g., The Edible Wom an to ``The Robber Bridegroom,'' The Handmaid's Tale to ``Little Red-Cap,'' and Cat's Eye to ``Rapunzel'' and ``Snow Queen.'' Fairy tales have been perceived by feminists as perpetuating negative female role models; however, Wilson illustrates Atwood's reworking of the traditional message to achieve a transformation that empowers women. Of additional interest are examples of Atwood's artwork, published here for the first time. This book adds a new dimension to critical studies of Atwood and to the appreciation of fairy tales. Recommended for women's studies and children's literature collections in academic libraries-- Mary Ellen Beck, Troy P.L., N.Y. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, December 1993
Choice, July 1994
Books in Canada, October 1994
Reference & Research Book News, December 1994
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Intriguing investigation of fairy-tale images in Atwood's haunting fiction, poetry, & artwork.
Main Description
Sharon Rose Wilson's analysis of Atwood's sexual politics through fairy-tale patterns offers a new reading of Atwood and a fresh appreciation of the traditional fairy tale's ability to illuminate modern literature. Challenging feminist assumptions that fairy tales limit gender roles, Wilson discloses the genius of this fascinating writer to use the fairy tale to transform the images of women and men. Fairy tales have been perceived by feminists as perpetuating negative female role models; however, Wilson illustrates Atwood's reworking of the traditional message to achieve a transformation that empowers women. Of additional interest are examples of Atwood's artwork, published here for the first time.
Table of Contents
Abbreviationsp. ix
Introductionp. xi
Intertextual Contexts and Purposes Fairy Tales and the Medusa Artistp. 3
Sexual Politics in Atwood's Visual Art "Fitcher's Bird" and the Triple Goddessp. 35
Cannibalism and Metamorphosis in the Edible Woman "The Robber Bridegroom"p. 82
Decapitation, Cannibalism, and Rebirth in Surfacing "The Juniper Tree" and French-Canadian Talesp. 97
Dancing for Others in Lady Oracle the Triple Goddess and "The Red Shoes"p. 120
Frozen Touch in You Are Happy the Rapunzel Syndrome and "The Girl Without Hands"p. 136
Regrowing Touch in LIfe Before Man "The Girl Without Hands" and the Wizard of Ozp. 165
The Artist's Marriage to Death in Bodily Harm "The Robber Bridegroom" and "The Girl Without Hands"p. 198
Bluebeard's Forbidden Room in Interlunar and "Bluebeard's Egg" "Fitcher's Bird," "The White Snake, "And Other Talesp. 229
Off the Path to Grandma's House in the Handmaid's Tale "Little Red Cap"p. 271
Cat's Eye VIsion "Rapunzel" and "The Snow Queen"p. 295
Appendixp. 315
Notesp. 347
Works Citedp. 390
Indexp. 411
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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