Catalogue


Making the English canon [electronic resource] : print-capitalism and the cultural past, 1700-1770 /
Jonathan Brody Kramnick.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1998.
description
viii, 287 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521641276 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1998.
isbn
0521641276 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
9543932
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 246-281) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-07-01:
Few readers and academics have missed the fierce debates recently waged over the nature of the canon in English studies, given widespread coverage of the subject in the journalistic press. With this debate in mind, Kramnick (Rutgers Univ.) turns to the 18th century to examine how the modern English canon--with its familiar trio of Shakespeare, Spenser, and Milton sitting on top of the hierarchy--was first formed. The author resists repeating the familiar narrative, originated by Jurgen Habermas, that places the birth of literary criticism within the rise of a public sphere. Instead, he finds the English canon results from a complicated struggle between social-minded critics and specialized professionals attempting to interpret works of the past, a struggle that continues to this day. Kramnick's account of how early English authors came to be considered "ancient," in the wake of the battle of the books, is particularly compelling. Despite the book's title, the author does not offer much social analysis of "print-capitalism," which has been the concern of many recent 18th-century critics, e.g., John Brewer, Clifford Siskin, and Barbara M. Benedict. Most appropriate for graduate students, researchers, and faculty. A. T. Vaver Brandeis University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Kramnick's book addresses worthwhile questions and challenging problems...The footnote citations constitute an extraordinarily rich and immensely convenient compendium of recent secondary materials." The Age of Johnson: A Scholarly Annual
'Kramnick's discussion of how Shakespeare and Spenser became the first English 'classics' will itself become classic. Making the English Canon is not simply a monograph on eighteenth-century literary aesthetics, it is a singularly powerful and authoritative contribution to perhaps the most important discussion going on in the literary humanities today.' Terry Castle
‘Kramnick’s discussion of how Shakespeare and Spenser became the first English ‘classics’ will itself become classic. Making the English Canon is not simply a monograph on eighteenth-century literary aesthetics, it is a singularly powerful and authoritative contribution to perhaps the most important discussion going on in the literary humanities today.’Terry Castle
‘While the rise of the English canon has been a topic of continuous and fraught interest over the past couple of decades Jonathan Kramnick offers the most coherent and detailed discussion of what is arguably its crucial historical moment: the middle decades of the eighteenth century. Kramnick’s discussion of how Shakespeare and Spenser became the first English ‘classics’ will itself become classic. Making the English Canon is not simply a monograph on eighteenth-century literary aesthetics, it is a singularly powerful and authoritative contribution to perhaps the most important discussion going on in the literary humanities today.’Terry Castle
Review of the hardback: 'While the rise of the English canon has been a topic of continuous and fraught interest over the past couple of decades Jonathan Kramnick offers the most coherent and detailed discussion of what is arguably its crucial historical moment: the middle decades of the eighteenth century. Kramnick's discussion of how Shakespeare and Spenser became the first English 'classics' will itself become classic. Making the English Canon is not simply a monograph on eighteenth-century literary aesthetics, it is a singularly powerful and authoritative contribution to perhaps the most important discussion going on in the literary humanities today.' Terry Castle
"The scope of this impressive first book is narrower than its title suggests...It accomplishes much, primarily by paying intelligent attention to a relatively neglected and pivotal twenty-year period in English criticism and by enganging important questions thoughtfully. Kramnick has begun to map some significant critical networks and fault lines in the eighteenth century. He does so with a combination of theoretical sophistication and investment that bodes well for his further explorations." Journal of English and Germanic Philology
'While the rise of the English canon has been a topic of continuous and fraught interest over the past couple of decades Jonathan Kramnick offers the most coherent and detailed discussion of what is arguably its crucial historical moment: the middle decades of the eighteenth century. Kramnick's discussion of how Shakespeare and Spenser became the first English 'classics' will itself become classic. Making the English Canon is not simply a monograph on eighteenth-century literary aesthetics, it is a singularly powerful and authoritative contribution to perhaps the most important discussion going on in the literary humanities today.' Terry Castle
‘Making the English Canon … is a singularly powerful and authoritative contribution to perhaps the most important discussion going on in the literary humanities today.’Terry Castle
"Making the English Canon is not simply a monograph on eighteenth-century literary aesthetics, it is a singularly powerful and authoritative contribution to perhaps the most important discussion going on in the literary humanities today." Terry Castle, Stanford University
'Making the English Canon ... is a singularly powerful and authoritative contribution to perhaps the most important discussion going on in the literary humanities today.' Terry Castle
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Jonathan Brody Kramnick’s book examines the formation of the English canon over the first two-thirds of the eighteenth century. Kramnick details how the idea of literary tradition emerged out of a prolonged engagement with the institutions of cultural modernity, from the public sphere and national identity to capitalism and the print market. Looking at a wide variety of eighteenth-century critical writing, he analyzes the tensions that inhabited the categories of national literature and public culture at the moment of their emergence.
Main Description
Jonathan Brody Kramnick's book examines the formation of the English canon over the first two-thirds of the eighteenth century. Kramnick details how the idea of literary tradition emerged out of a prolonged engagement with the institutions of cultural modernity, from the public sphere and national identity to capitalism and the print market. Looking at a wide variety of eighteenth-century critical writing, he analyses the tensions that inhabited the categories of national literature and public culture at the moment of their emergence.
Description for Bookstore
This book offers an original examination of the formation of the English canon during the first two thirds of the eighteenth century, looking in particular at the treatment of Shakespeare, Spenser and Milton. Through close readings of periodical essays, editions, treatises, reviews, disquisitions, pamphlets and poems, Jonathan Brody Kramnick recounts the origins of modern literary study and situates the rise of national literary tradition in the broad context of the making of a public culture.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The rise of the Engish canon has been the subject of much debate over the last 20 years. More than a monograph on the topic, it is a powerful and authoritative contribution to the most important discussion taking place in the humanities today.
Description for Bookstore
Jonathan Brody Kramnick's book examines the formation of the English canon over the first two-thirds of the eighteenth century. Kramnick details how the idea of literary tradition emerged out of a prolonged engagement with the institutions of cultural modernity, from the public sphere and national identity to capitalism and the print market.
Description for Bookstore
Jonathan Brody Kramnick's book examines the formation of the English canon over the first two-thirds of the eighteenth century. Kramnick details how the idea of literary tradition emerged out of a prolonged engagement with the institutions of cultural modernity, from the public sphere and national identity to capitalism and the print market. Looking at a wide variety of eighteenth-century critical writing, he analyzes the tensions that inhabited the categories of national literature and public culture at the moment of their emergence.
Table of Contents
Introduction: the modernity of the past
The structural transformation of literary history
The mode of consecration: between aesthetics and historicism
Novel to Lyric: Shakespeare in the field of culture, 1752-1754
The cultural logic of late feudalism: or, Spenser and the romance of scholarship, 1754-1762
Shakespeare's nation: the literary profession and the 'shades of ages'
Afterword: the present crisis
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem