Catalogue


Repositioning nutrition as central to development [electronic resource] : a strategy for large scale action /
[produced by a team led by Meera Shekar, with Richard Heaver and Yi-Kyoung Lee].
imprint
Washington, DC : World Bank, c2006.
description
xix, 246 p. : ill., col. maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0821363999, 9780821363997
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Washington, DC : World Bank, c2006.
isbn
0821363999
9780821363997
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
9393116
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 219-237) and index.
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Summaries
Long Description
Persistent malnutrition is contributing not only to widespread failure to meet the first MDG¿to halve poverty and hunger¿but to meet other goals in maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, education, and gender equity. The choice is now between continuing to fail, or to finally make nutrition central to development. Underweight prevalence among children is the key indicator for measuring progress on non-income poverty and malnutrition remains the world¿s most serious health problem and the single biggest contributor to child mortality. Nearly a third of children in the developing world are either underweight or stunted, and more than 30 percent of the developing world¿s population suffers from micronutrient deficiencies. There are also new dimensions to malnutrition. The epidemic of obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is spreading to the developing world and malnutrition is also linked to the growing HIV/AIDS pandemic. This report makes the case for development partners and developing countries to focus on nutrition, and to fund nutrition investments much more heavily than has been the case in the past. This case is based on evidence that such programs are excellent economic investments and essential for faster progress in reducing poverty; and on program experience showing that they can improve nutrition much faster than relying on economic growth alone. The report sets out a global strategy for stepped-up action in nutrition, for discussion in the international development community.
Main Description
Persistent malnutrition is contributing not only to widespread failure to meet the first MDG ”to halve poverty and hunger ”but to meet other goals in maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, education, and gender equity. The choice is now between continuing to fail, or to finally make nutrition central to development. Underweight prevalence among children is the key indicator for measuring progress on non-income poverty and malnutrition remains the world's most serious health problem and the single biggest contributor to child mortality. Nearly a third of children in the developing world are either underweight or stunted, and more than 30 percent of the developing world's population suffers from micronutrient deficiencies. There are also new dimensions to malnutrition. The epidemic of obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is spreading to the developing world and malnutrition is also linked to the growing HIV/AIDS pandemic.This report makes the case for development partners and developing countries to focus on nutrition, and to fund nutrition investments much more heavily than has been the case in the past. This case is based on evidence that such programs are excellent economic investments and essential for faster progress in reducing poverty; and on program experience showing that they can improve nutrition much faster than relying on economic growth alone. The report sets out a global strategy for stepped-up action in nutrition, for discussion in the international development community.
Long Description
Persistent malnutrition is contributing not only to widespread failure to meet the first MDG-to halve poverty and hunger-but to meet other goals in maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, education, and gender equity. The choice is now between continuing to fail, or to finally make nutrition central to development. Underweight prevalence among children is the key indicator for measuring progress on nonincome poverty and malnutrition remains the world's most serious health problem and the single biggest contributor to child mortality. Nearly a third of children in the developing world are either underweight or stunted, and more than 30 percent of the developing world's population suffers from micronutrient deficiencies. There are also new dimensions to malnutrition. The epidemic of obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is spreading to the developing world and malnutrition is also linked to the growing HIV/AIDS pandemic. This report makes the case for development partners and developing countries to focus on nutrition, and to fund nutrition investments much more heavily than has been the case in the past. This case is based on evidence that such programs are excellent economic investments and essential for faster progress in reducing poverty; and on program experience showing that they can improve nutrition much faster than relying on economic growth alone. The report sets out a global strategy for stepped-up action in nutrition, for discussion in the international development community.
Table of Contents
Why invest in nutrition?p. 21
How serious is malnutrition and why does it happen?p. 42
Routes to better nutritionp. 62
Getting to scalep. 95
Accelerating progress in nutrition : next stepsp. 113
Country experience with short routes to improving nutritionp. 132
Long routes to improving nutritionp. 136
Key priorities for action research in nutrition : a proposalp. 140
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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