Catalogue


Planning, connecting, and financing cities--now [electronic resource] : priorities for city leaders.
imprint
Washington, DC : World Bank, c2013.
description
xv, 111 p. : col. ill., col. maps ; 27 cm.
ISBN
0821398393, 9780821398395
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
added author
imprint
Washington, DC : World Bank, c2013.
isbn
0821398393
9780821398395
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
"This report was written by a team led by Somik V. Lall"--P. xi.
catalogue key
9392949
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
This report provides Mayors and other policymakers with a policy framework and diagnostic tools to anticipate and implement strategies that can avoid their cities from locking into irreversible physical and social structures. At the core of the policy framework are the three main dimensions of urban development. Planning- where the focus is on making land transactions easier, and making land use regulations more responsive to emerging needs especially to coordinate land use planning with infrastructure, natural resource management, and risks from hazards; Connecting-where the focus is on making a city's markets (for labor, goods, and services) more accessible to neighborhoods in the city and to other cities. Here the focus is also on investing in public transport, and pricing private transport fully; and Financing- where the focus is on how a city can leverage its own assets to finance new assets for example, through land value capture, establishing creditworthiness for local governments and utilities to access domestic debt and bond markets and how to set clear and consistent rules to attract private investors to create jobs in cities.This report also distills lessons from prototypes urbanization diagnostics which have been piloted to reflect challenges for countries at nascent (Uganda, Vietnam), intermediate (China, India, Indonesia), and mature (Brazil, Colombia, South Korea, Turkey) urbanization. These diagnostics under the World Bank's Urbanization Review program have engaged strategic counterparts, such as those in national ministries of finance and planning, in thinking about policy choices that influence urbanization and city development.
Main Description
This report provides mayors and other policymakers with a policy framework and diagnostic tools to anticipate and implement strategies that can prevent their cities from locking into irreversible physical and social structures. At the core of the policy framework are the three main dimensions of urban development. Planning - making land transactions easier, and making land use regulations more responsive to emerging needs, especially when coordinating land use planning with infrastructure, natural resource management, and risks from hazards; Connecting - making a city's markets (for labour, goods, and services) more accessible to neighborhoods in the city and to other cities. Here the focus is also on investing in public transport and pricing private transport fully; and Financing - enabling a city to leverage its own assets to finance new assets, for example, through land value capture; establishing creditworthiness for local governments and utilities so they can access domestic debt and bond markets; and setting clear and consistent rules to attract private investors to create jobs in cities. This report also distills lessons from prototypes of urbanisation diagnostics which reflect challenges for countries at nascent (Uganda, Vietnam), intermediate (China, India, Indonesia), and mature (Brazil, Colombia, South Korea, Turkey) urbanisation. These diagnostics under the World Bank's Urbanization Review program have engaged strategic counterparts, such as those in national ministries of finance and planning, in thinking about policy choices that influence urbanization and city development.
Main Description
Planning, Connecting, and Financing Cities-Now provides mayors and other policy makers with a policy framework and diagnostic tools to anticipate and implement strategies that can preclude their cities from locking into irreversible physical and social structures. At the core of the policy framework are three main dimensions of urban development:
Main Description
This report provides Mayors and other policymakers with a policy framework and diagnostic tools to anticipate and implement strategies that can avoid their cities from locking into irreversible physical and social structures. At the core of the policy framework are the three main dimensions of urban development. * Planning-- where the focus is on making land transactions easier, and making land use regulations more responsive to emerging needs especially to coordinate land use planning with infrastructure, natural resource management, and risks from hazards; * Connecting-- where the focus is on making a city's markets (for labor, goods, and services) more accessible to neighborhoods in the city and to other cities. Here the focus is also on investing in public transport, and pricing private transport fully; and * Financing-- where the focus is on how a city can leverage its own assets to finance new assets for example, through land value capture, establishing creditworthiness for local governments and utilities to access domestic debt and bond markets and how to set clear and consistent rules to attract private investors to create jobs in cities.This report also distills lessons from prototypes urbanization diagnostics which have been piloted to reflect challenges for countries at nascent (Uganda, Vietnam), intermediate (China, India, Indonesia), and mature (Brazil, Colombia, South Korea, Turkey) urbanization. These diagnostics under the World Bank's Urbanization Review program have engaged strategic counterparts, such as those in national ministries of finance and planning, in thinking about policy choices that influence urbanization and city development.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
About the Authorsp. xiii
Abbreviationsp. xv
Overviewp. 1
Planning citiesp. 15
Slums are not inevitable: Rules for flexible land use and coordinated connections can improve living conditionsp. 35
The value of market rules for basic services: For expanded coverage and increased efficiency, it's not all about the moneyp. 37
Connecting citiesp. 41
New cities should be well located, flexibly regulated, and efficiently connected: Lessons from China, the Arab Republic of Egypt, and the Republic of Korea on placement, policy, and provision of infrastructurep. 63
Financing citiesp. 67
Innovations in municipal finance: FINDETER and TNUDFp. 79
Framework in action: Lessons from Urbanization Reviewsp. 83
Brazilp. 83
Chinap. 88
Colombiap. 92
Indiap. 96
Indonesiap. 101
The Republic of Koreap. 105
Vietnamp. 108
Boxes
Thinking through policy and investment choices using the World Bank's Urbanization Reviewsp. 3
Planning, connecting, and financing cities: How the World Bank can help city leadersp. 12
Greening city growth: Coordinating land use and infrastructure planningp. 19
Successful policy reform in Armenia is based on a well-defined policy framework, clear service-level targets, and incentives for public private participationp. 28
Identifying road connection constraints in Vietnam: The World Bank's trucking industry surveyp. 44
The Republic of Korea's strategic decisions to expand infrastructure networks enabled the development of new townsp. 55
Bus rapid transit: Successful if handled with carep. 58
Subnational debt finance: Making it sustainablep. 71
Paying for infrastructure through ancillary servicesp. 72
Implementing public-private partnerships-lessons from Chile and Mexicop. 74
Leveraging land to finance infrastructure: Four lessons from international experiencep. 76
China's urban infrastructure financingp. 90
Figures
Urbanization Review countries, by urbanization rate (2009) and GDP per capita (2010)p. 3
A framework of rules: Planning, connecting, and financingp. 4
Vietnam's dual land price system creates problems for the assembly of large plots of land needed for industryp. 17
Bottlenecks in accessing industrial land for private investmentp. 17
São Paulo finances infrastructure improvements by selling land development rightp. 22
Share of population with access to piped water across countries and city sizesp. 23
Utilities in some of India's largest cities do not recover their operating and management costs for water supply and sanitation through user fees, 2006-07p. 27
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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