Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Hitler's scientists : science, war, and the devil's pact /
John Cornwell.
imprint
New York : Penguin Books, 2004, c2003.
description
xvi, 535 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., ports. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0142004804 (pbk.), 9780142004807 (pbk)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Penguin Books, 2004, c2003.
isbn
0142004804 (pbk.)
9780142004807 (pbk)
contents note
Hitler's scientific inheritance -- The new physics, 1918-1933 -- Nazi enthusiasm, compliance, and oppression, 1933-1939 -- The science of destruction and defence, 1933-1943 -- The Nazi atomic bomb, 1941-1945 -- Science in hell, 1942-1945 -- In Hitler's shadow -- Science from the Cold War to the War on Terrorism.
general note
First published in the United States of America by Viking Penguin, a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc. 2003." -- T.p. verso.
abstract
In Hitler's Scientists, British historian John Cornwell explores German scientific genius in the first half of the twentieth century and shows how Germany's early lead in the new physics led to the discovery of atomic fission, which in turn led the way to the atom bomb, and how the ideas of Darwinism were hijacked to create the lethal doctrine of racial cleansing.
catalogue key
9293939
 
Includes bibliographical references ([501]-512) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2003-06-15:
After his best-selling Hitler's Pope, a Cambridge historian stirs more controversy. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2003-08-25:
Cornwell's devastating bestseller Hitler's Pope is a tough act to follow. Here, the author again claims the moral high ground to critique the ethical and political choices of scientists in Hitler's Germany and to caution that science under the Western democracies in the Cold War and the war on terrorism also wielded and continues to wield the "Janus-faced power for good and evil." Today's best writers on the Hitler era have outgrown the kind of marginalizing polemic Cornwell employs here. His analysis of Nazi science, while built on sound research and often thoughtful critique, sinks to the sensationalism of "Faustian bargains," "scientific prostitutions" and Arendt's "banality of evil." Unsavory concepts are qualified as "pseudo-science," "half-baked," or simply "science" in quotation marks so that the undiscerning reader won't mistake them for the real thing. All the hot-button issues are on display here: racial hygiene; eugenics; the Nazi purge of academia and Germany's forfeiture of its greatest physicists to the Allies because they were Jewish; and human experimentation on concentration camp inmates. The author also details the science of war in Germany, from rockets and secret codes to radar and the atomic bomb, and how the Allies plundered the country's military technology and expertise after the fall of the Third Reich. Cornwell is a gifted writer with a fascinating story to tell, which he ably and engagingly accomplishes despite the hyperbole. But in his pursuit of comfort in right over wrong, the author forfeits objectivity and perhaps a greater understanding of the sources and the whys of the Nazi phenomenon. Despite this,, the author's articulate though subtly lurid repackaging of Nazi-era crimes and curiosities should guarantee much attention and brisk sales with general readers. Illus. not seen by PW. Agent, Bob Lescher. (On sale Oct. 13) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
A comprehensive, well-documented, and, above all, thoughtful account of the scientists who served Hitler. ( The Washington Post )
A comprehensive, well-documented, and, above all, thoughtful account of the scientists who served Hitler. (The Washington Post)
A comprehensive, well-documented, and, above all, thoughtful account of the scientists who served Hitler. (The Washington Post) Wide ranging and accessible . . . [A] disturbing and important account. (The Economist)
Wide ranging and accessible . . . [A] disturbing and important account. ( The Economist )
Wide ranging and accessible . . . [A] disturbing and important account. (The Economist)
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
An eye-opening account of the rise of science in Germany through to Hitlers regime, and the frightening Nazi experiments that occurred during the Reich A shocking account of Nazi science, and a compelling look at the the dramatic rise of German science in the nineteenth century, its preeminence in the early twentieth, and the frightening developments that led to its collapse in 1945, this is the compelling story of German scientists under Hitlers regime. Weaving the history of science and technology with the fortunes of war and the stories of men and women whose discoveries brought both benefits and destruction to the world, "Hitlers Scientists" raises questions that are still urgent today. As science becomes embroiled in new generations of weapons of mass destruction and the war against terrorism, as advances in biotechnology outstrip traditional ethics, this powerful account of Nazi science forms a crucial commentary on the ethical role of science.
Main Description
An eye-opening account of the rise of science in Germany through to Hitler's regime, and the frightening Nazi experiments that occurred during the Reich A shocking account of Nazi science, and a compelling look at the the dramatic rise of German science in the nineteenth century, its preeminence in the early twentieth, and the frightening developments that led to its collapse in 1945, this is the compelling story of German scientists under Hitler's regime. Weaving the history of science and technology with the fortunes of war and the stories of men and women whose discoveries brought both benefits and destruction to the world, Hitler's Scientists raises questions that are still urgent today. As science becomes embroiled in new generations of weapons of mass destruction and the war against terrorism, as advances in biotechnology outstrip traditional ethics, this powerful account of Nazi science forms a crucial commentary on the ethical role of science.
Main Description
Covering the dramatic rise of German science in the nineteenth century, its preeminence in the early twentieth, and the frightening developments that led to its collapse in 1945, this is the compelling story of German scientists under Hitler’s regime. Weaving the history of science and technology with the fortunes of war and the stories of men and women whose discoveries brought both benefits and destruction to the world, Hitler’s Scientistsraises questions that are still urgent today. As science becomes embroiled in new generations of weapons of mass destruction and the war against terrorism, as advances in biotechnology outstrip traditional ethics, this powerful account of Nazi science forms a crucial commentary on the ethical role of science.
Main Description
Covering the dramatic rise of German science in the nineteenth century, its preeminence in the early twentieth, and the frightening developments that led to its collapse in 1945, this is the compelling story of German scientists under Hitler's regime. Weaving the history of science and technology with the fortunes of war and the stories of men and women whose discoveries brought both benefits and destruction to the world, Hitler's Scientists raises questions that are still urgent today. As science becomes embroiled in new generations of weapons of mass destruction and the war against terrorism, as advances in biotechnology outstrip traditional ethics, this powerful account of Nazi science forms a crucial commentary on the ethical role of science.
Unpaid Annotation
The bestselling author of "Hitler's Pope" takes a historical look at science freed from ethics, in this "comprehensive, well-documented, and, above all, thoughtful account of the scientists who served Hitler--or, at least, Germany--during the Third Reich" ("The Washington Post"). 16 pages of photos.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem