Catalogue


Religion and psychiatry [electronic resource] : beyond boundaries /
editors, Peter J. Verhagen ... [et al.].
imprint
Chichester, UK : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.
description
xvii, 667 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0470694718 (alk. paper), 9780470694718 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Chichester, UK : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.
isbn
0470694718 (alk. paper)
9780470694718 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
9275696
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Peter J. Verhagen, Meerkanten GGZ, Harderwijk, The Netherlands Herman M. van Praag, University of Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands Juan J. Lpez-Ibor Jr., Complutense University, Madrid, Spain John L. Cox, University, Gloucestershire, UK Driss Moussaoui, Ibn Rushd University, Casablanca, Morocco
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The range is very broad, there is a fair degree of debate within the volume, and attempting to bring the combatants together in discussion sections may be valuable in a second edition. Considering the enormity and controversial nature of the subject, the editors must be commended on producing this valuable volume." (Mental health, religion and culture, 1 January 2011) "All in all: very readable, a large amount of material brought together in a single volume, a milestone marking the beginning of a new, less ideological and less conflict-ridden era in the history of psychiatry and religion." ( Dutch Theological Journal, 2010 ) "offers an outstanding collection of chapters dealing with mental health and religion. Its editors, Peter J. Verhagen, Herman M. van Praag, Juan J. Lopez-Ibor Jr., John L. Cox., and Driss Moussaoui, have assembled a great variety of chapters dealing with topics that are of great interest to psychologists studying religion." (www.psyrel.com)
"All in all: very readable, a large amount of material brought together in a single volume, a milestone marking the beginning of a new, less ideological and less conflict-ridden era in the history of psychiatry and religion." ( Dutch Theological Journal, 2010 )
"All in all: very readable, a large amount of material brought together in a single volume, a milestone marking the beginning of a new, less ideological and less conflict-ridden era in the history of psychiatry and religion." (Dutch Theological Journal, 2010)
"All in all: very readable, a large amount of material brought together in a single volume, a milestone marking the beginning of a new, less ideological and less conflict-ridden era in the history of psychiatry and religion." ( Dutch Theological Journal, 2010 ) "offers an outstanding collection of chapters dealing with mental health and religion. Its editors, Peter J. Verhagen, Herman M. van Praag, Juan J. Lopez-Ibor Jr., John L. Cox., and Driss Moussaoui, have assembled a great variety of chapters dealing with topics that are of great interest to psychologists studying religion." (www.psyrel.com)
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Religion (and spirituality) is very much alive and shapes the cultural values and aspirations of psychiatrist and patient alike, as does the choice of not identifying with a particular faith. Patients bring their beliefs and convictions into the doctor-patient relationship. The challenge for mental health professionals, whatever their own world view, is to develop and refine their vocabularies such that they truly understand what is communicated to them by their patients. Religion and Psychiatry provides psychiatrists with a framework for this understanding and highlights the importance of religion and spirituality in mental well-being. This book aims to inform and explain, as well as to be thought provoking and even controversial. Patiently and thoroughly, the authors consider why and how, when and where religion (and spirituality) are at stake in the life of psychiatric patients. The interface between psychiatry and religion is explored at different levels, varying from daily clinical practice to conceptual fieldwork. The book covers phenomenology, epidemiology, research data, explanatory models and theories. It also reviews the development of DSM V and its awareness of the importance of religion and spirituality in mental health. What can religious traditions learn from each other to assist the patient? Religion and Psychiatry discusses this, as well as the neurological basis of religious experiences. It describes training programmes that successfully incorporate aspects of religion and demonstrates how different religious and spiritual traditions can be brought together to improve psychiatric training and daily practice. Describes the relationship of the main world religions with psychiatry Considers training, policy and service delivery Provides powerful support for more effective partnerships between psychiatry and religion in day to day clinical care This is the first time that so many psychiatrists, psychologists and theologians from all parts of the world and from so many different religious and spiritual backgrounds have worked together to produce a book like this one. In that sense, it truly is a World Psychiatric Association publication. Religion and Psychiatry is recommended reading for residents in psychiatry, postgraduates in theology, psychology and psychology of religion, researchers in psychiatric epidemiology and trans-cultural psychiatry, as well as professionals in theology, psychiatry and psychology of religion
Long Description
Religion (and spirituality) is very much alive and shapes the cultural values and aspirations of psychiatrist and patient alike, as does the choice of not identifying with a particular faith. Patients bring their beliefs and convictions into the doctor-patient relationship. The challenge for mental health professionals, whatever their own world view, is to develop and refine their vocabularies such that they truly understand what is communicated to them by their patients. Religion and Psychiatry provides psychiatrists with a framework for this understanding and highlights the importance of religion and spirituality in mental well-being.This book aims to inform and explain, as well as to be thought provoking and even controversial. Patiently and thoroughly, the authors consider why and how, when and where religion (and spirituality) are at stake in the life of psychiatric patients. The interface between psychiatry and religion is explored at different levels, varying from daily clinical practice to conceptual fieldwork. The book covers phenomenology, epidemiology, research data, explanatory models and theories. It also reviews the development of DSM V and its awareness of the importance of religion and spirituality in mental health.What can religious traditions learn from each other to assist the patient? Religion and Psychiatry discusses this, as well as the neurological basis of religious experiences. It describes training programmes that successfully incorporate aspects of religion and demonstrates how different religious and spiritual traditions can be brought together to improve psychiatric training and daily practice. Describes the relationship of the main world religions with psychiatry Considers training, policy and service delivery Provides powerful support for more effective partnerships between psychiatry and religion in day to day clinical careThis is the first time that so many psychiatrists, psychologists and theologians from all parts of the world and from so many different religious and spiritual backgrounds have worked together to produce a book like this one. In that sense, it truly is a World Psychiatric Association publication.Religion and Psychiatry is recommended reading for residents in psychiatry, postgraduates in theology, psychology and psychology of religion, researchers in psychiatric epidemiology and trans-cultural psychiatry, as well as professionals in theology, psychiatry and psychology of religion.
Bowker Data Service Summary
With contributions from psychiatrists, psychologists and theologians from around the world, this book is a comprehensive account of the interplay between psychiatry and religion, covering all the major world religions.
Main Description
With contributions from psychiatrists, psychologists and theologians from around the world, Religion and Psychiatry is a comprehensive account of the interplay between psychiatry and religion, covering all the major world religions. This landmark work sheds light on the importance of religion and spirituality in mental health and provides psychiatrists with a framework for understanding their roles in patients' mental well-being. Written primarily for psychiatrists, the book covers training, policy and service delivery and provides powerful support for more effective partnerships between psychiatry and religion in day-to-day clinical care.
Table of Contents
List of Contributorsp. ix
Forewordp. xiii
Prefacep. xv
General Introduction: Religion and Sciencep. 1
Prolegomena (First Issues): History, Philosophy, Science and Culturep. 11
Introductionp. 11
Evil in Historical Perspective: At the Intersection of Religion and Psychiatryp. 13
Linguistic Analysis and Values-Based Practice: One Way of Getting Started with Some Kinds of Philosophical Problems at the Interface Between Psychiatry and Religionp. 39
Science and Transcendence in Psychopathology; Lessons from Existentialismp. 63
Psychiatry of the Whole Person - Contribution of Spirituality in form of Mystic (Sufi) Thinkingp. 73
Main issues: The Interface Between Psychiatry, Mental Health and Major Religious Traditionsp. 87
Introductionp. 87
Judaism and Psychiatryp. 89
Christianity and Psychiatryp. 105
Religion and Mental Health in Islamp. 119
Psychiatry and African Religionp. 143
Hinduism and Mental Healthp. 159
Buddhism and Psychotherapy in Japanp. 181
Psychiatry and Theravada Buddhismp. 193
Core Issues: Religion and Psychopathologyp. 209
Introductionp. 209
Religious Experience and Psychopathologyp. 211
God's Champions and Adversaries: About the Borders between Normal and Abnormal Religiosityp. 235
Religion and Psychopathology: Psychosis and Depressionp. 253
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Religion: A Reconnaissancep. 271
Religion and Psychoanalysis: Past and Presentp. 283
On the Psychology of Religious Fundamentalismp. 305
Measurement at the Interface of Psychiatry and Religion: Issues and Existing Measuresp. 319
Research issuesp. 341
Introductionp. 341
Religion and Mental Health: What Do You Mean When You Say 'Religion'? What Do You Mean When You Say 'Mental Health'?p. 343
A Moment of Anger, a Lifetime of Favor: Image of God, Personality, and Orthodox Religiosityp. 361
The Relationship Between an Orthodox Protestant Upbringing and Current Orthodox Protestant Adherence, DSM-IV Axis II B Cluster Personality Disorders and Structural Borderline Personality Organizationp. 373
When Religion Goes Awry: Religious Risk Factors for Poorer Health and Well-Beingp. 389
Religious Practice and Mental Health: a Moroccan Experiencep. 413
Religious and Spiritual Considerations in Psychiatric Diagnosis: Considerations for the DSM-Vp. 423
Interdisciplinary Issues: Psychotherapy, Pastoral Care and Meaning Givingp. 445
Introductionp. 445
Gods of the Horizon: The Therapist's and the Patient's Religious Representations and the Inevitability of Countertransferencep. 447
Assumptions About Pastoral Care, Spirituality and Mental Healthp. 479
Coming to Terms with Loss in Schizophrenia - The Search for Meaningp. 497
Controversial Issues: Religion and the Brainp. 513
Introductionp. 513
The Limits of Scientific Understanding and their Relevance for the Role of Religion in Psychiatryp. 515
Seat of the Divine: A Biological 'Proof of God's Existence'?p. 523
Neuro-Theology: Demasqué of Religionsp. 541
Training Issues: Residency Training and Continuous Educationp. 569
Introductionp. 569
Religion and the Training of Psychotherapistsp. 571
Multicultural Education and Training in Religion and Spiritualityp. 587
Epilogue: Proposal for a World Psychiatric Association Consensus or Position Statement on Spirituality and Religion in Psychiatryp. 615
Notes on Contributorsp. 633
Index of Namesp. 647
Index of Subjectsp. 651
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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