Catalogue


The trojan horse : the growth of commercial sponsorship /
by Deborah Philips and Garry Whannel.
imprint
New York, NY : Bloomsbury, 2013, c2013
description
278 p. ; 25 cm
ISBN
147250738X (hardcover : alk. paper), 9781472507389 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Bloomsbury, 2013, c2013
isbn
147250738X (hardcover : alk. paper)
9781472507389 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
The moment of 1945 and its legacy -- A culture of consensus: the arts from 1945 -- Pay up and play the game: sport and sponsorship -- Neo-liberalism and New Labour: from Thatcher to Blair -- Culture and enterprise: the arts from 1979 -- One amazing day... : the Millennium Dome -- Education, education, education -- Safe in their hands: health and the market -- All in it together?
catalogue key
9260030
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 257-268) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
Commercial sponsorship now pervades our lives, intruding private interests into the management of our public and collective affairs at great social cost and with few economic benefits as the weaknesses and failures of free-market economics become increasingly manifest. By demonstrating this in convincing detail, Deborah Philips and Garry Whannel#146;s broad-ranging and incisive study provides an invaluable service in re-asserting the principles of publicness that need to be defended against the Trojan Horse of privatisation. An important and timely book.
Deborah Philips and Garry Whannel have given us a great gift--a book that manages to transcend its times, even as it captures them. They analyze the ruins of neoliberalism's baleful influence on British life, from culture to sport to health. Blending political economy with cultural studies, The Trojan Horse expertly describes thirty years of struggle and mystification.
From art and sport to education and health, the authors describe how seemingly benevolentsponsorship is the Trojan Horse that has facilitated a creeping erosion of corporate interestsinto the public sector. In a devastating critique of the demise of the welfare state, Philips andWhannel document the colonisation of public space by commercial priorities that enables privateenterprise to set the agendas of our schools, hospitals, care homes and surgeries with deleteriousconsequences. Wide-ranging, insightful and shocking to boot, this is a "must read" for anyoneinterested in the nature of public value and the hidden power of corporations.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'The Trojan Horse' traces the growth of commercial sponsorship in the public sphere since the 1960s, it's growing importance for the arts since 1980 and its spread into areas such as education and health. The authors' central argument is that the image of sponsorship as corporate benevolence has served to routinize and legitimate the presence of commerce within the public sector.
Main Description
The Trojan Horse traces the growth of commercial sponsorship in the public sphere since the 1960s, its growing importance for the arts since 1980 and its spread into areas such as education and health. The authors#146; central argument is that the image of sponsorship as corporate benevolence has served to routinize and legitimate the presence of commerce within the public sector. The central metaphor is of such sponsorship as a Trojan Horse helping to facilitate the hollowing out of the public sector by private agencies and private finance.The authors place the study in the context of the more general colonization of the state by private capital and the challenge posed to the dominance of neo-liberal economics by the recent global financial crisis. After considering the passage from patronage to sponsorship and outlining the context of the post-war public sector since 1945, it analyses sponsorship in relation to Thatcherism, enterprise culture and the restructuring of public provision during the 1980s. It goes on to examine the New Labour years, and the ways in which sponsorship has paved the way for the increased use of private-public partnerships and private finance initiatives within the public sector in the UK.
Main Description
"The Trojan Horse "traces the growth of commercial sponsorship in the public sphere since the 1960s, its growing importance for the arts since 1980 and its spread into areas such as education and health. The authors central argument is that the image of sponsorship as corporate benevolence has served to routinize and legitimate the presence of commerce within the public sector. The central metaphor is of such sponsorship as a Trojan horse helping to facilitate the hollowing out of the pubic sector by private agencies, and private finance.The authors place the study in the context of the more general colonization of the state by private capital and the challenge posed to the dominance of neo-liberal economics by the recent global financial crisis. After considering the passage from patronage to sponsorship and outlining the context of the post-war public sector, it will analyze sponsorship in relation to Thatcherism, enterprise culture and the restructuring of public provision during the eighties. It goes on to examine the Blair years and the ways in which sponsorship has paved the way for the increase use of private-public partnerships and private finance initiatives within the public sector in the UK.
Main Description
The Trojan Horse traces the growth of commercial sponsorship in the public sphere since the 1960s, it's growing importance for the arts since 1980 and its spread into areas such as education and health. The authors' central argument is that the image of sponsorship as corporate benevolence has served to routinize and legitimate the presence of commerce within the public sector. The central metaphor is of such sponsorship as a Trojan horse helping to facilitate the hollowing out of the pubic sector by private agencies, and private finance.The authors place the study in the context of the more general colonization of the state by private capital and the challenge posed to the dominance of neo-liberal economics by the recent global financial crisis. After considering the passage from patronage to sponsorship and outlining the context of the post-war public sector, it will analyze sponsorship in relation to Thatcherism, enterprise culture and the restructuring of public provision during the eighties. It goes on to examine the Blair years and the ways in which sponsorship has paved the way for the increase use of private-public partnerships and private finance initiatives within the public sector in the UK.
Main Description
"The Trojan Horse" traces the growth of commercial sponsorship in the public sphere since the 1960s, its growing importance for the arts since 1980 and its spread into areas such as education and health. The authors' central argument is that the image of sponsorship as corporate benevolence has served to routinize and legitimate the presence of commerce within the public sector. The central metaphor is of such sponsorship as a Trojan Horse helping to facilitate the hollowing out of the public sector by private agencies and private finance.The authors place the study in the context of the more general colonization of the state by private capital and the challenge posed to the dominance of neo-liberal economics by the recent global financial crisis. After considering the passage from patronage to sponsorship and outlining the context of the post-war public sector since 1945, it analyses sponsorship in relation to Thatcherism, enterprise culture and the restructuring of public provision during the 1980s. It goes on to examine the New Labour years, and the ways in which sponsorship has paved the way for the increased use of private-public partnerships and private finance initiatives within the public sector in the UK.
Main Description
The Trojan Horse traces the growth of commercial sponsorship in the public sphere since the 1960s, its growing importance for the arts since 1980 and its spread into areas such as education and health. The authors' central argument is that the image of sponsorship as corporate benevolence has served to routinize and legitimate the presence of commerce within the public sector. The central metaphor is of such sponsorship as a Trojan Horse helping to facilitate the hollowing out of the public sector by private agencies and private finance.The authors place the study in the context of the more general colonization of the state by private capital and the challenge posed to the dominance of neo-liberal economics by the recent global financial crisis. After considering the passage from patronage to sponsorship and outlining the context of the post-war public sector since 1945, it analyses sponsorship in relation to Thatcherism, enterprise culture and the restructuring of public provision during the 1980s. It goes on to examine the New Labour years, and the ways in which sponsorship has paved the way for the increased use of private-public partnerships and private finance initiatives within the public sector in the UK.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem