Catalogue


Russia and China on the eve of a new millennium /
Carl Linden & Jan S. Prybyla ; with an introduction by Jan S. Prybyla.
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, 1997.
description
x, 341 p.
ISBN
1560002913 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, 1997.
isbn
1560002913 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
924381
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1997-06:
The authors have written nine essays that analyze the breakdown of totalitarian regimes in Eastern Europe and Russia and assess the current and prospective political and economic situation in China. Although they attempt to focus on economic issues, their work is more a compendium of ideological and doctrinaire issues, addressing such topics as cultural values, ethics, nationalism, etc. In presenting their argument the authors essentially follow Hayekian doctrine based on the conviction of the superiority of Western civilization and historical experience (free market capitalism). Accordingly, the entire volume suffers from the deficiencies intrinsic to the Hayekian approach: oversimplification and overgeneralization. The weaknesses are particularly apparent in interpretation of certain phenomena and events (Yeltsin's rise to power and the bloodshed in the Russian Parliament in September 1993, for example), which are sometimes extremely one-sided and inaccurate. The critical comparison between China's and Russia's experiences appears to be a result of preconceived ideological assertions rather than of a positive analysis. Admirers of Hayek and von Mieses will have a lot of fun, though. Notes after each chapter. Comprehensive academic collections. Z. Suster; University of New Haven
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The authors have written nine essays that analyze the breakdown of totalitarian regimes in Eastern Europe and Russia and assess the current and prospective political and economic situation in China… Comprehensive academic collections." -Z. Suster, Choice "...A collection of thoughtful and far-ranging essays by two senior scholars. The book hangs together better than most edited volumes." -American Journal of Chinese Studies
"The authors have written nine essays that analyze the breakdown of totalitarian regimes in Eastern Europe and Russia and assess the current and prospective political and economic situation in China... Comprehensive academic collections." --Z. Suster, Choice "...A collection of thoughtful and far-ranging essays by two senior scholars. The book hangs together better than most edited volumes." --American Journal of Chinese Studies
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 1997
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Summaries
Main Description
This volume assesses the collapse of totalitarian power and its consequences in Russia and surrounding nations. The situation with China is different, with economic openness struggling against political repression. Linden and Prybyla assert that, despite the apparent economic success of politically despotic China and economic tribulations of the politically more pluralistic countries of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, the Russians and East Europeans have the sounder approach. How Russia works through its crisis of identity and how China works through the contradiction between free-market economics and communist dictatorship will deeply affect the shape of our world in the new millennium.
Main Description
"...A collection of thoughtful and far-ranging essays by two senior scholars. The book hangs together better than most edited volumes." --American Journal of Chinese Studies
Main Description
"...A collection of thoughtful and far-rangingessays by two senior scholars. The book hangs together better than most editedvolumes." --American Journal of Chinese Studies
Main Description
Russia and China on the Eve of a New Millennium assesses the collapse of totalitarian power and its consequences in Russia and surrounding nations. The situation in China is different, with economic openness struggling against political repression. The book focuses on the economic issues of systematic transition because, if not properly handled, they risk diverting or altogether derailing the impulse toward democracy. The authors consider hotly disputed issues of ideology, cultural values, beliefs, doctrine, and ethics; the threat to national unity and the promise of material prosperity offered by regionalism; and projections of future trends. Central to their work is the conviction that at the end of collectivist serfdom lies not absolute perfection, but vast increases in individual freedom, initiative, and responsibility; democratic governance; and spontaneous market coordination of economic choices. In Russia the failure of Marxian totalitarianism led to the political revolution of 1989-1991 that swept away its power structures. The attempt at "revolution from above" to save Soviet communism unleashed the "revolution from below" that destroyed it. The core issue now is whether the surge of nationalism coming after the great collapse will flow into democratic or return to despotic channels. In China the totalitarian systemic failure was most apparent in the economic bankruptcy of the system of command of economics and central planning. Deng Xiaoping carried out a strategic retreat to save the regime by launching into economic reformation; he freed the peasantry from state control and opened the command economy to the influx of market forces. The authors claim that the new forces arising out of burgeoning markets sap the foundations of communist power and are likely in time to turn Deng's retreat into a rout under his successors. Linden and Prybyla assert that, despite the apparent economic success of politically despotic China and economic tribulations of the politically more pluralistic countries of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, the Russians and East Europeans have the sounder approach. How Russia works through its crisis of identity and how China works through the contradiction between free market economics and communist dictatorship will deeply affect the shape of our world in the new millennium. The book includes contributions from Lawrence D. Orton, Marie-Luise Nath, Franz Michael, Jiirgen Domes, and Yuan-li Wu. It is a must read for political scientists, economists, policymakers, and Russian and Asian studies specialists.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
Europe and Russia: Totalitarian Collapse and Transition - Introduction to Part Ip. 21
Transforming Eastern Europep. 23
Gorbachev and the Fall of the Marxian Prince in Europe and Russiap. 59
Yeltsin and the Russian Republic's Rebirth in a Time of Troublesp. 89
From Doctrine to Ethicsp. 133
China: Totalitarian Retreat and Reformation - Introduction to Part IIp. 163
On Economic Systems and the Marketp. 165
On Systemic Transition: Will China Go Capitalist?p. 209
Can Regionalism Work in China?p. 251
The Future of China: Alternative Projections and Scenariosp. 265
Taiwan and the Shaping of China's Futurep. 291
Summary and Conclusionsp. 315
About the Contributorsp. 327
Bibliographyp. 329
Indexp. 335
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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