Catalogue


The wars of Reconstruction : the brief, violent history of America's most progressive era /
Douglas R. Egerton.
edition
1st U.S. edition.
imprint
New York : Bloomsbury, 2014, c2014.
description
438 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
160819566X (alk. paper), 9781608195664 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Bloomsbury, 2014, c2014.
isbn
160819566X (alk. paper)
9781608195664 (alk. paper)
contents note
Prologue: Robert Vesey's Charleston -- "An eagle on his button": Black men fight for the union -- "To forget and forgive old scores": war's end, activism's beginning -- "All de land belongs to de yankees now": the Freedmen's Bureau -- "The Lord has sent us books and teachers": missionaries and community formation -- "We will remember our friends, and will not forget our enemies": black codes and black conventions -- "Andrew Johnson is but one man": the Progressive Alliance coalesces -- "We knows that much better than you do": voting rights and political service -- "An absolute massacre": white violence and the end of Reconstruction in the South -- "We shall be recognized as men": the Reconstruction Era in memory -- Epilogue: the spirit of freedom monument.
catalogue key
9226778
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 363-420) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
A lively, expertly rendered narrative of politics as a prelude to war.
Fascinating account of the bizarre and explosive election of 1860
Thanks to Egerton's insight into 19th-century political strategy and skullduggery, the graceful Year of Meteors reads like a fresh insider-informed exposé of a modern presidential election instead of an exposé of a race that took place when Maine had more residents than California....
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Summaries
Main Description
By 1870, just five years after Confederate surrender and thirteen years after the Dred Scott decision ruled blacks ineligible for citizenship, Congressional action had ended slavery and given the vote to black men. That same year, Hiram Revels and Joseph Hayne Rainey became the first African-American U.S. senator and congressman respectively. In South Carolina, only twenty years after the death of arch-secessionist John C. Calhoun, a black man, Jasper J. Wright, took a seat on the states Supreme Court. Not even the most optimistic abolitionists had thought such milestones would occur in their lifetimes. The brief years of Reconstruction marked the United States most progressive moment prior to the civil rights movement. Previous histories of Reconstruction have focused on Washington politics. But in this sweeping, prodigiously researched narrative, Douglas Egerton brings a much bigger, even more dramatic story into view, exploring state and local politics and tracing the struggles of some fifteen hundred African-American officeholders, in both the North and South, who fought entrenched white resistance. Tragically, their movement was met by ruthless violence--not just riotous mobs, but also targeted assassination. With stark evidence, Egerton shows that Reconstruction, often cast as a "failure" or a doomed experiment, was rolled back by murderous force." The Wars of Reconstruction" is a major and provocative contribution to American history.
Main Description
By 1870, just five years after Confederate surrender and thirteen years after the Dred Scott decision ruled blacks ineligible for citizenship, Congressional action had ended slavery and given the vote to black men. That same year, Hiram Revels and Joseph Hayne Rainey became the first African-American U.S. senator and congressman respectively. In South Carolina, only twenty years after the death of arch-secessionist John C. Calhoun, a black man, Jasper J. Wright, took a seat on the state's Supreme Court. Not even the most optimistic abolitionists had thought such milestones would occur in their lifetimes. The brief years of Reconstruction marked the United States' most progressive moment prior to the civil rights movement. Previous histories of Reconstruction have focused on Washington politics. But in this sweeping, prodigiously researched narrative, Douglas Egerton brings a much bigger, even more dramatic story into view, exploring state and local politics and tracing the struggles of some fifteen hundred African-American officeholders, in both the North and South, who fought entrenched white resistance. Tragically, their movement was met by ruthless violencenot just riotous mobs, but also targeted assassination. With stark evidence, Egerton shows that Reconstruction, often cast as a "failure" or a doomed experiment, was rolled back by murderous force. The Wars of Reconstruction is a major and provocative contribution to American history.
Main Description
By 1870, just five years after Confederate surrender and thirteen years after the Dred Scott decision ruled blacks ineligible for citizenship, Congressional action had ended slavery and given the vote to black men. That same year, Hiram Revels and Joseph Hayne Rainey became the first African-American U.S. senator and congressman respectively. In South Carolina, only twenty years after the death of arch-secessionist John C. Calhoun, a black man, Jasper J. Wright, took a seat on the state's Supreme Court. Not even the most optimistic abolitionists thought such milestones would occur in their lifetimes. The brief years of Reconstruction marked the United States' most progressive moment prior to the civil rights movement. Previous histories of Reconstruction have focused on Washington politics. But in this sweeping, prodigiously researched narrative, Douglas Egerton brings a much bigger, even more dramatic story into view, exploring state and local politics and tracing the struggles of some fifteen hundred African-American officeholders, in both the North and South, who fought entrenched white resistance. Tragically, their movement was met by ruthless violencenot just riotous mobs, but also targeted assassination. With stark evidence, Egerton shows that Reconstruction, often cast as a "failure" or a doomed experiment, was rolled back by murderous force. The Wars of Reconstruction is a major and provocative contribution to American history.

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