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Democratizing the Old Dominion : Virginia and the second party system, 1824-1861 /
William G. Shade.
imprint
Charlottesville : University Press of Virginia, 1996.
description
xvii, 365 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0813916542 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Charlottesville : University Press of Virginia, 1996.
isbn
0813916542 (alk. paper)
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
921164
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1997-06:
Readers interested in the emergence and development of a peculiarly American form of democracy are likely to enjoy this book. Shade summarizes his research as a "study of the expansion of political participation in a slave state that came late to white manhood suffrage and the partisan response of a government generally committed to the maxim government governs best that governs least." In his comprehensive analysis of antebellum Virginia politics, Shade reveals a striking parallel between national political development and the emergence of the two-party system in the Old Dominion. In Shade's view, the similarities in political and economic development between North and South overshadow the differences. Employing research that highlights Virginia's diverse regional cultures as well as some notable social, ethnic, and religious divisions among voters, Shade concludes that the more developed process of party politics evident in the second American party system furthered democracy in Virginia. Although this book will appeal to all students of Virginia history and those interested in the development of party politics, the advanced nature of the argument renders it most suitable for graduate students and serious researchers. S. C. Hyde; Southeastern Louisiana University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 1997
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Summaries
Main Description
The emergence of the two-party system in the 1830s led to the democratization of the nation and to decades of heated dispute about democracy. In Democratizing the Old Dominion, the first comprehensive study of antebellum Virginia politics, William G. Shade demonstrates that Virginia typified the nation more closely than did any other state both in the emergence and development of the two-party system and in economic development.
Unpaid Annotation
The Emergence of the two-party system in the 1830s led to the democratization of the nation and to decades of heated dispute about democracy. In Democratizing the Old Dominion, the first comprehensive study of antebellum Virginia politics, William G. Shade demonstrates that Virginia typified the nation more closely than did any other state both in the emergence and development of the two-party system and in economic development. Shade places the antebellum debate over slavery and states' rights in the context of early discussion on these subjects by Jefferson and Madison. He shows how the diversity of opinion on these issues was shaped by politics. Discussing the many conflicts within Virginia and the South, he debunks the myth of the unique South and argues that the similarities between North and South were more numerous than the differences. The author also provides a thorough analysis of Virginia's many regional cultures, looking at them comparatively as well as in the context of national party conflicts.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Preface
Introduction: The Partisan Leaderp. 1
Notes on the State of Virginiap. 17
The Constitution of Virginiap. 50
A Candid State of Partiesp. 78
Out of the Nature of Thingsp. 114
One Hundred and Seventy-Three Despotsp. 158
A Review of the Slave Questionp. 191
The Doctrines of '98p. 225
Political Development and Political Decayp. 262
The Augusta County Whig Connectionp. 293
Voting Blocs on Slavery in the House of Delegates, 1832p. 297
Notesp. 299
Indexp. 354
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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