Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

1611 : authority, gender and the word in early modern England /
Helen Wilcox.
imprint
Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, c2014
description
xvi, 253 p.
ISBN
1405193913 (hardback), 9781405193917 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, c2014
isbn
1405193913 (hardback)
9781405193917 (hardback)
contents note
Jonson's Oberon and friends: masque and music in 1611 -- Aemilia Lanyer and the "first fruits" of women's wit -- Coryats Crudities and the "travelling Wonder" of our age -- Time, tyrants and the question of authority: The Winter's Tale and related drama -- "Expresse words": Lancelot Andrewes and the sermons and devotions of 1611 -- The Roaring Girl on and off stage -- "The New World of Words": authorising translation in 1611 -- Donne's "Anatomy" and the commemoration of women: "Her death hath taught us dearely" -- Vengeance and virtue: The Tempest and the triumph of tragicomedy -- Conclusion: "This scribling age"
abstract
"1611: Authority, Gender, and the Word in Early Modern England explores issues of authority, gender, and language within and across the variety of literary works produced in one of most landmark years in literary and cultural history. Represents an exploration of a year in the textual life of early modern England juxtaposes the variety and range of texts that were published, performed, read, or heard in the same year, 1611 offers an account of the textual culture of the year 1611, the environment of language, and the ideas from which the authorised version of the English Bible emerged "--
catalogue key
9155479
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In 1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England, Helen Wilcox transports us back to the rich textual history of a single year in Jacobean England, where she proves to be the most amiable and knowledgeable of guides. Side by side, elite works next to popular, the year unfolds with all the curious excitement of an elegantly presented almanac. Whether your preference is for The King James Bible or Dekker and Middleton's The Roaring Girl, Coryates Crudities or The Winter's Tale, this is a splendid slice-of-life introduction to early modern England that will please new readers and specialists alike." - Jonathan F.S. Post, University of California, Los Angeles
"In 1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England, Helen Wilcox transports us back to the rich textual history of a single year in Jacobean England, where she proves to be the most amiable and knowledgeable of guides. Side by side, elite works next to popular, the year unfolds with all the curious excitement of an elegantly presented almanac. Whether your preference is for The King James Bible or Dekker and Middleton's The Roaring Girl, Coryates Crudities or The Winter's Tale, this is a splendid slice-of-life introduction to early modern England that will please new readers and specialists alike." -- Jonathan F.S. Post, University of California, Los Angeles "Fascinating, elegant, and eminently readable, 1611 is a treasure trove of information and critical insight. Wilcox displays great range, writing as smartly about Shakespeare as about Lanyer, about secular as about devotional works. She makes juxtapositions and connections among texts that are unexpected and illuminating." -- Achsah Guibbory , Barnard College
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
English literature and culture underwent transformative changes during the years following the death of Queen Elizabeth. Fundamental issues of identity informed by issues such as religious anxieties and debates on gender were being addressed for the first time by writers, poets, and playwrights of early 17th century England. 1611: Authority, Gender, and the Word in Early Modern England presents a lively and accessible account of the textual cultures of a landmark year in literary and cultural history. Author and literary scholar Helen Wilcox reveals the stunning range of texts that emerged in 1611, from the publication of the King James Bible and George Chapman's new translation of Homer to the first printed works of poet John Donne and a selection of poems by Aemelia Lanyer, the first such volume in English written by a woman. Wilcox explores the wide range of literary styles and genres produced in this banner year -- from travel-writing, madrigals, satires, and almanacs to sermons, drama, and orations -- and delves deeply into issues of authority, gender, and language within and across the different works. By presenting a frozen moment in time in our literary past, 1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England offers a rich and vivid sense of the depth, range, and power of the textual world of 17th-century England.
Long Description
English literature and culture underwent transformative changes during the years following the death of Queen Elizabeth. Fundamental issues of identity informed by issues such as religious anxieties and debates on gender were being addressed for the first time by writers, poets, and playwrights of early 17th century England. 1611: Authority, Gender, and the Word in Early Modern England presents a lively and accessible account of the textual cultures of a landmark year in literary and cultural history. Author and literary scholar Helen Wilcox reveals the stunning range of texts that emerged in 1611, from the publication of the King James Bible and George Chapmans new translation of Homer to the first printed works of poet John Donne and a selection of poems by Aemelia Lanyer, the first such volume in English written by a woman. Wilcox explores the wide range of literary styles and genres produced in this banner year -- from travel-writing, madrigals, satires, and almanacs to sermons, drama, and orations -- and delves deeply into issues of authority, gender, and language within and across the different works. By presenting a frozen moment in time in our literary past, 1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England offers a rich and vivid sense of the depth, range, and power of the textual world of 17th-century England.
Main Description
1611: Authority, Gender, and the Word in Early Modern England explores issues of authority, gender, and language within and across the variety of literary works produced in one of most landmark years in literary and cultural history. Represents an exploration of a year in the textual life of early modern England Juxtaposes the variety and range of texts that were published, performed, read, or heard in the same year, 1611 Offers an account of the textual culture of the year 1611, the environment of language, and the ideas from which the Authorised Version of the English Bible emerged

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem