Catalogue


Barack Obama and the rhetoric of hope /
Mark S. Ferrara.
imprint
Jefferson, North Carolina : McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, [2013]
description
202 pages ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780786467938 (softcover : acid free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, North Carolina : McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, [2013]
isbn
9780786467938 (softcover : acid free paper)
abstract
"The "rhetoric of hope" is a form of political discourse characterized by a forward-looking vision of social progress brought about by collective effort and adherence to shared values. By combining his own personal story with national mythologies, Barack Obama creates a narrative persona that embodies the moral values and cultural mythos of his implied audience" --
catalogue key
9150373
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 197-200) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mark S. Ferrara is an assistant professor of English at SUNY Oneonta, New York.
Summaries
Main Description
The historical and literary antecedents of the President's campaign rhetoric can be traced to the utopian traditions of the Western world. The "rhetoric of hope" is a form of political discourse characterized by a forward-looking vision of social progress brought about by collective effort and adherence to shared values (including discipline, temperance, a strong work ethic, self-reliance and service to the community).By combining his own personal story (as the biracial son of a white mother from Kansas and a black father from Kenya) with national mythologies like the American Dream, Obama creates a persona that embodies the moral values and cultural mythos of his implied audience. In doing so, he draws upon the Classical world, Judeo-Christianity, the European Enlightenment, the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights, the presidencies of Jefferson, Lincoln, and FDR, slave narratives, the Black church, the civil rights movement and even popular culture.
Main Description
The historical and literary antecedents of the President's campaign rhetoric can be traced to the utopian traditions of the Western world. The rhetoric of hope is a form of political discourse characterized by a forward-looking vision of social progress brought about by collective effort and adherence to shared values (including discipline, temperance, a strong work ethic, self-reliance, and service to the community). By combining his own personal story (as the biracial son of a white mother from Kansas and a black father from Kenya) with national mythologies like the American Dream, Obama creates a narrative persona that embodies the moral values and cultural mythos of his implied audience. In doing so, he draws upon the Classical world, Judeo-Christianity, the European Enlightenment, the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights, the presidencies of Jefferson, Lincoln, and FDR, slave narratives, the Black church, the civil rights movement, and even popular culture. Barack Obama's understanding of history as an ongoing process of transformation toward social betterment provides the basis for his ultimate rhetorical formulation of a multicultural utopia that transcends national boundaries.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. 9
Prefacep. 11
Introduction: Idealism and the American Mindp. 13
Judeo-Christianity and the Rational Utopiap. 21
American Founding Documentsp. 33
Slave Narratives, the Black Church and Civil Rightsp. 46
The Legacy of Three Great Presidentsp. 62
The Force of Fiction, Music and Popular Culturep. 86
Values and the Content of Characterp. 107
Constructing the Narrative Personap. 124
Universalism, Globalization and the Multicultural Utopiap. 139
Rhetoric and the Presidencyp. 153
The 2012 Campaignp. 167
Chapter Notesp. 189
Selected Bibliographyp. 197
Indexp. 201
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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