Catalogue


What will it take to make a woman president? : conversations about women, leadership, and power /
Marianne Schnall.
imprint
Berkeley, Calif. : Seal Press, [2013], c2013
description
373 p. ; 23 cm
ISBN
158005496X (pbk.), 9781580054966 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley, Calif. : Seal Press, [2013], c2013
isbn
158005496X (pbk.)
9781580054966 (pbk.)
contents note
Melissa Harris-Perry -- Jennifer Siebel Newsom -- Pat Mitchell -- Donna Brazile -- Mary Fallin -- Joy Behar -- Ana Navarro -- Maya Angelou -- Michael Kimmel -- Barbara Lee -- Claire McCaskill -- Olympia Snowe -- Gavin Newsom -- Nancy Pelosi -- Don McPherson -- Soledad O'Brien -- Sheryl Sandberg -- Jessica Valenti -- Marianne Williamson -- Melissa Etheridge -- Nicholas Kristof -- Gloria Steinem -- Anita Hill -- Kirsten Gillibrand -- Elizabeth Lesser -- Kathy Najimy -- Eleanor Holmes Norton -- Marie Wilson -- Kay Bailey Hutchison.
abstract
"Features interviews with politicians, public officials, thought leaders, writers, artists, and activists in an attempt to discover the obstacles that have held women back and what needs to change in order to elect a woman into the White House"--Amazon.com.
catalogue key
9120707
A Look Inside
First Chapter
The word “female,” when inserted in front of something, is always with a note of surprise—female COO, female pilot, female surgeon—as if the gender implies surprise, which it does. I am a female leader. One day there won't be female leaders. There will just be leaders.
—Sheryl Sandberg

There’s been a lot written about what the world would be like with more women. My view is that if all the players play, that creates more competition and more records get broken. I just think we would perform better as a society. Plus, I want to live in a more equal world.
—Sheryl Sandberg

I think that humor is a powerful tool to use. It's a great talent to have because you can disarm people. You can make your point. . . . When I first started standup comedy, I think part of my motivation for getting into it was because I felt powerless as a woman in this society. I was becoming invisible. I was already thirty-nine. After thirty-five you become invisible, pretty much, certainly to men. I was just becoming more and more invisible, and I was like, I have things to say. I have to do it. As hard as that was, I got up on that stage with a microphone in my hand and I went there. Of course, no one was going to listen to me if I was just talking, so I had to make them laugh, so then they listened to me. So I think that it has a very powerful effect on people.
—Joy Behar

I had an uncle who said to me, “Why do you have to go to college? You're a girl. You're going to get married.” I actually heard those words.
—Joy Behar

[In] the past fifty years, I think women have made incredible progress, that African Americans and other minorities have made incredible progress. And so, if you look at it in the overall scheme of things, I think we've come a long way, baby.
—Joy Behar

Leadership in the future, whether it's male or female, I believe will start to come from a place of the idea of this great experiment called democracy . . . and to do that we have to have it inside ourselves to know not to fear any diversity, but to be able to coexist with everything and anything, and that's where power and strength for communities and our country comes from.
—Melissa Etheridge

It's the funny joke on America that we want to be perceived as one thing and what we really are, and have always been, is this amazing diversity. This idea, this dream that there's a land where anyone can come to and become anything they dream. How do we hold the American dream? When you realize it's for everyone and it doesn't matter if someone else dreams it, you're still going to have enough.
—Melissa Etheridge

We were raised in this country to believe that we were the best. That this was the country that was going to save the world. We were the leader of the free. We were the world's leader. And now we look around and we're kind of like, “Wait a minute. We've got some problems here.”
—Melissa Etheridge

I think this conversation is important for everyone, because as much as we tend to focus on elite positions—like having Fortune 500 companies or the presidency or Congress—it’s about leadership in our own lives. All these kinds of skills, limitations, and hurdles we’re talking about are not just happening at the top levels, they’re happening in everyday workplaces, as well.
—Jessica Valenti

Women don’t run for office at the same levels that men do because they’re taught to think that they’re not qualified. So if a city council seat comes up and you ask a guy who has the same experience that a woman has, “Are you qualified?” and he’ll say, “Absolutely!” You talk to the woman and she’ll say, “Well, no, I don’t think so. I don’t think I’m the right kind of person” or “I don’t have the right kind of experience.” So we have to start with building up confidence and just getting women to want to put their names in the hat.
—Jessica Valenti

I think the reason that there are fewer women—that there is a gender gap in the media, there’s a gender gap in elected office, there’s a gender gap in high level corporate America—it’s all the same reasons. Because, until very recently, women have been the ones that bore the brunt of family and home responsibilities. And it’s not been until recently that that has begun to change and we are now in an era where shared responsibilities have become the norm, not the exception.
—Ana Navarro

Anybody who doesn’t acknowledge that there’s a growing diversity in the American electorate lives in a cave with their head in the sand—and that means gays, it means women, it means young people, it means blacks, it means Hispanics, it means Asians.
—Ana Navarro
Summaries
Main Description
Prompted by a question from her eight-year-old daughter during the 2008 election of Barack Obama--"Why haven't we ever had a woman president?"--Marianne Schnall set out on a journey to find the answer. A widely published writer, author, and interviewer, and the Executive Director of Feminist.com, Schnall began looking at the issues from various angles and perspectives, gathering viewpoints from influential people from all sectors. What Will It Take to Make A Woman President? features interviews with politicians, public officials, thought leaders, writers, artists, and activists in an attempt to discover the obstacles that have held women back and what needs to change in order to elect a woman into the White House. With insights and personal anecdotes from Sheryl Sandberg, Maya Angelou, Gloria Steinem, Nancy Pelosi, Nicholas Kristof, Melissa Etheridge, and many more, this book addresses timely, provocative issues involving women, politics, and power. With a broader goal of encouraging women and girls to be leaders in their lives, their communities, and the larger world, Schnall and her interviewees explore the changing paradigms occurring in politics and in our culture with the hope of moving toward meaningful and effective solutions--and a world where a woman can be president.
Main Description
This timely discussion features interviews with the country's most notable women, from Nancy Pelosi to Melissa EtheridgePrompted by a question from her eight-year-old daughter during the 2008 election of Barack Obama--"Why haven't we ever had a woman president?"--Marianne Schnall set out on a journey to find the answer. A widely published writer, author, and interviewer, and the Executive Director of Feminist.com, Schnall began looking at the issues from various angles and perspectives, gathering viewpoints from influential people from all sectors. 'What Will It Take to Make A Woman President?' features interviews with politicians, public officials, thought leaders, writers, artists, and activists in an attempt to discover the obstacles that have held women back and what needs to change in order to elect a woman into the White House.With insights and personal anecdotes from Sheryl Sandberg, Maya Angelou, Gloria Steinem, Nancy Pelosi, Nicholas Kristof, Melissa Etheridge, and many more, this book addresses timely, provocative issues involving women, politics, and power. With a broader goal of encouraging women and girls to be leaders in their lives, their communities, and the larger world, Schnall and her interviewees explore the changing paradigms occurring in politics and in our culture with the hope of moving toward meaningful and effective solutions--and a world where a woman can be president.
Main Description
This timely discussion features interviews with the country's most notable women, from Nancy Pelosi to Melissa Etheridge'What Will It Take to Make a Woman President?' features conversations with more than twenty leading politicians, writers, artists, and activists about why America has not yet elected a female president. To find out what it will take to get a woman into the White House, expert interviewer Marianne Schnall looks at the issue from many different angles and perspectives, gathering insights from high profile, influential people from all sectors.The interviews consider a variety of questions, including:What would a woman bring to the presidency and to leadership of the US and the world?What obstacles (societal, political, and self-imposed) have been holding women back?What changes need to happen to make this a reality?Are we really ready for a female president?Featuring conversations about timely, provocative, and rich themes that concern women, politics, and power, 'What Will It Take to Make a Woman President?' also includes personal insights and life experiences from the interview subjects themselves. With a comprehensive resource guide for further reading and action, this book takes an essential look at the possibility of women in the White House.
Main Description
This timely discussion features interviews with the country's most notable women, from Nancy Pelosi to Melissa Etheridge'What Will It Take to Make a Woman President?' features conversations with more than twenty leading politicians, writers, artists, and activists about why America has not yet elected a female president. To find out what it will take to get a woman into the White House, expert interviewer Marianne Schnall tackles the issue from many different angles and perspectives, gathering insights from high profile, influential leaders from all sectors.The interviews include a variety of provocative questions, including:What would a woman bring to the presidency and to leadership of the US and the world?What obstacles (societal, political, and self-imposed) have been holding women back?What changes need to happen to make a female president a reality?Is America really ready for a female president?With interviews that focus on the timely, provocative issues involving women, politics, and power, 'What Will It Take to Make a Woman President?' also includes personal insights and anecdotes from the interview subjects themselves. With a comprehensive resource guide for further reading and action, this book takes an essential look at women, leadership, and influence.
Main Description
"What Will It Take to Make a Woman President?" features conversations with more than twenty leading politicians, writers, artists, and activists about why America has not yet elected a female president. To find out what it will take to get a woman into the White House, expert interviewer Marianne Schnall tackles the issue from many different angles and perspectives, gathering insights from high profile, influential leaders from all sectors. The interviews include a variety of provocative questions, including: What would a woman bring to the presidency and to leadership of the US and the world?What obstacles (societal, political, and self-imposed) have been holding women back?What changes need to happen to make a female president a reality?Is America really ready for a female president? With interviews that focus on the timely, provocative issues involving women, politics, and power, "What Will It Take to Make a Woman President?" also includes personal insights and anecdotes from the interview subjects themselves. With a comprehensive resource guide for further reading and action, this book takes an essential look at women, leadership, and influence.
Main Description
What Will It Take to Make a Woman President? features conversations with more than twenty leading politicians, writers, artists, and activists about why America has not yet elected a female president. To find out what it will take to get a woman into the White House, expert interviewer Marianne Schnall tackles the issue from many different angles and perspectives, gathering insights from high profile, influential leaders from all sectors. The interviews include a variety of provocative questions, including: What would a woman bring to the presidency and to leadership of the US and the world? What obstacles (societal, political, and self-imposed) have been holding women back? What changes need to happen to make a female president a reality? Is America really ready for a female president? With interviews that focus on the timely, provocative issues involving women, politics, and power, What Will It Take to Make a Woman President? also includes personal insights and anecdotes from the interview subjects themselves. With a comprehensive resource guide for further reading and action, this book takes an essential look at women, leadership, and influence.

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