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Sudan [electronic resource] : Darfur and the failure of an African state /
Richard Cockett.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2010.
description
x, 315 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780300162738 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2010.
isbn
9780300162738 (pbk. : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
9106078
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [304]-306) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dr Richard Cockett is Africa Editor of the Economist.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-12-01:
The referendum on the south of Sudan to separate from the north scheduled for January 2011, so it is fortunate to have this informative general account of Africa's largest and potentially richest country. Cockett, a historian with a PhD from University College, London, knows the material well, and as a writer for The Economist, he knows how to present it in an engaging fashion. Although the book's subtitle singles out Darfur, the text encompasses the entire country, starting in the modern era with the 19th-century Mahdist uprising against the Ottomans through the succeeding, disastrous Anglo-Egyptian Condominium, which set the stage for the dysfunctional politics of independence. A serious look at the two civil wars between the north and south precedes a detailed account of Darfur. Each contemporary concern is enlivened by the author's personal reflections or those of informants. Except for some cavalier uses of terms such as "tribe," "animists," and "genocide," the book is well worth the attention of those who want to know more about the Sudan's past, present, and likely future. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. W. Arens Stony Brook University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"For those readers who know nothing more about the country than what is reported in the Western media, his book will be a revelation." The Gunboat
"...well-researched, beautifully written and thoroughly absorbing, despite the wrenching tragedies [this book] must chronicle." -George Ayittey, The Wall Street Journal
"...well-researched, beautifully written and thoroughly absorbing, despite the wrenching tragedies [this book] must chronicle." -George Ayittey,The Wall Street Journal
"...well-researched, beautifully written and thoroughly absorbing, despite the wrenching tragedies [this book] must chronicle."George Ayittey, The Wall Street Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Wall Street Journal, August 2010
PW Annex Reviews, September 2010
Choice, December 2010
The Australian, December 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is an account of Sudan's descent into failure. Drawing on interviews with many of the main players, the book explains how and why Sudan has disintegrated, looking in particular at the country's complex relationship with the wider world.
Main Description
Over the Last two decades, the situation in Sudan, Africa's largest country, has progressively deteriorated. The country is in second position on the Failed States Index; a war in Darfur has claimed hundreds of thousands of lives; President Bashir has been indicted by the International Criminal Court; and South Sudan is hoping to break away altogether.
Main Description
Over the past two decades, the situation in Africa's largest country, Sudan, has progressively deteriorated: the country is in second position on the Failed States Index, a war in Darfur has claimed hundreds of thousands of deaths, President Bashir has been indicted by the International Criminal Court, a forthcoming referendum on independence for Southern Sudan threatens to split the country violently apart. In this fascinating and immensely readable book, the Africa editor of the Economist gives an absorbing account of Sudan's descent into failure and what some have called genocide. Drawing on interviews with many of the main players, Richard Cockett explains how and why Sudan has disintegrated, looking in particular at the country's complex relationship with the wider world. He shows how the United States and Britain were initially complicit in Darfur--but also how a broad coalition of human-rights activists, right-wing Christians, and opponents of slavery succeeded in bringing the issues to prominence in the United States and creating an impetus for change at the highest level.
Main Description
Over the past two decades, the situation in Africa's largest country, Sudan, has progressively deteriorated: the country is in second position on the Failed States Index, a war in Darfur has claimed hundreds of thousands of deaths, President Bashir has been indicted by the International Criminal Court, a forthcoming referendum on independence for Southern Sudan threatens to split the country violently apart. In this fascinating and immensely readable book, the Africa editor of the Economist gives an absorbing account of Sudan's descent into failure and what some have called genocide. Drawing on interviews with many of the main players, Richard Cockett explains how and why Sudan has disintegrated, looking in particular at the country's complex relationship with the wider world. He shows how the United States and Britain were initially complicit in Darfurbut also how a broad coalition of human-rights activists, right-wing Christians, and opponents of slavery succeeded in bringing the issues to prominence in the United States and creating an impetus for change at the highest level.
Main Description
Over the past two decades, the situation in Africa's largest country, Sudan, has progressively deteriorated: the country is in second position on the Failed States Index, a war in Darfur has claimed hundreds of thousands of deaths, President Bashir has been indicted by the International Criminal Court, a forthcoming referendum on independence for Southern Sudan threatens to split the country violently apart. In this fascinating and immensely readable book, the Africa editor of theEconomistgives an absorbing account of Sudan's descent into failure and what some have called genocide. Drawing on interviews with many of the main players, Richard Cockett explains how and why Sudan has disintegrated, looking in particular at the country's complex relationship with the wider world. He shows how the United States and Britain were initially complicit in Darfurbut also how a broad coalition of human-rights activists, right-wing Christians, and opponents of slavery succeeded in bringing the issues to prominence in the United States and creating an impetus for change at the highest level.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
List of Illustrationsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
The One-City Statep. 6
Populists and Civil War, 1956-89p. 56
The National Islamic Front and Turabi in Power, 1989-2000p. 96
Sudan and the West: slavery, conscience and al-Qaedap. 143
Darfur: how the killing was allowed to happenp. 168
Darfur: the vortexp. 211
Surviving in the North, Failing in the Southp. 250
Afterwordp. 289
Notesp. 300
Select Bibliographyp. 304
Indexp. 307
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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