Catalogue


Discipline in the secondary classroom : a positive approach to behavior management /
Randall S. Sprick, Ph. D.
edition
Third edition.
imprint
San Francisco : Jossey-Bass, [2013]
description
xxvi, 436 pages ; 28 cm + 1 videodisc (4 3/4 in.)
ISBN
1118450876 (paper/dvd), 9781118450871 (paper/dvd)
format(s)
DVD
Holdings
More Details
imprint
San Francisco : Jossey-Bass, [2013]
isbn
1118450876 (paper/dvd)
9781118450871 (paper/dvd)
standard identifier
99954799763
catalogue key
9102628
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Randall S. Sprick, Ph.D., is a nationally known authority on classroom management and positive behavior support. He is director of Safe Civil Schools, a provide of training and school-improvement services to schools, districts, service centers, and state departments of education.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Now in its third edition, Discipline in the Secondary Classroom is the bestselling resource that offers both new and seasoned teachers a hands-on guide brimming with practical advice, tips, checklists, reproducibles, and ready-to-use activities that get results. Discipline in the Secondary Classroom is written to be a teacher's go-to reference for designing a management plan that prevents problems, motivates students, and teaches students to behave responsibly. Step by step, the book outlines an effective classroom management plan based on Randall S. Sprick's acclaimed STOIC framework. By following the STOIC approach, readers will learn how to prevent and calmly address misbehavior and confidently implement research-based strategies to maximize student motivation. The teacher-tested STOIC approach guides you through developing a classroom management plan that will: S tructure and organize all settings to prompt responsible student behavior. T each your expectations regarding how to behave responsibly within the structure you have created. O bserve whether students are meeting expectations by physically circulating, visually scanning, and collecting meaningful data. I nteract positively with students to build relationships and provide frequent, age-appropriate positive feedback. C orrect irresponsible behavior fluently--calmly, consistently, immediately, briefly, respectfully, and (as much as possible) privately. This accessible, value-packed resource shows educators how to create a well-managed classroom where learning flourishes. In addition, the companion DVD features short video lessons from discipline and classroom management expert Randall Sprick, along with a wealth of checklists, forms, peer discussion worksheets, and tools that are described within the book. The DVD also features three sets of ready-to-use graphic icons that educators can use to teach and display their classroom expectations. "This book empowers educators to become behavior problem-solvers. Dr. Sprick has found a way to blend the science of behavior management with the art of teaching!" -- Lissa Vasquez , social emotional supports manager, Fresno Unified School District, California "An extraordinary resource. This readable book is written with passion, and contains vivid examples and countless practical suggestions that can be readily implemented." --From the foreword by Donald D. Deshler , director, University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning
Back Cover Copy
Now in its third edition, Discipline in the Secondary Classroom is the bestselling resource that offers both new and seasoned teachers a hands-on guide brimming with practical advice, tips, checklists, reproducibles, and ready-to-use activities that get results. Discipline in the Secondary Classroom is written to be a teacher's go-to reference for designing a management plan that prevents problems, motivates students, and teaches students to behave responsibly. Step by step, the book outlines an effective classroom management plan based on Randall S. Sprick's acclaimed STOIC framework. By following the STOIC approach, readers will learn how to prevent and calmly address misbehavior and confidently implement research-based strategies to maximize student motivation. The teacher-tested STOIC approach guides you through developing a classroom management plan that will: S tructure and organize all settings to prompt responsible student behavior. T each your expectations regarding how to behave responsibly within the structure you have created. O bserve whether students are meeting expectations by physically circulating, visually scanning, and collecting meaningful data. I nteract positively with students to build relationships and provide frequent, age-appropriate positive feedback. C orrect irresponsible behavior fluently-calmly, consistently, immediately, briefly, respectfully, and (as much as possible) privately. This accessible, value-packed resource shows educators how to create a well-managed classroom where learning flourishes. In addition, the companion DVD features short video lessons from discipline and classroom management expert Randall Sprick, along with a wealth of checklists, forms, peer discussion worksheets, and tools that are described within the book. The DVD also features three sets of ready-to-use graphic icons that educators can use to teach and display their classroom expectations. "This book empowers educators to become behavior problem-solvers. Dr. Sprick has found a way to blend the science of behavior management with the art of teaching!" - Lissa Vasquez , social emotional supports manager, Fresno Unified School District, California "An extraordinary resource. This readable book is written with passion, and contains vivid examples and countless practical suggestions that can be readily implemented." -From the foreword by Donald D. Deshler , director, University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning
Bowker Data Service Summary
This third edition of 'Discipline in the Secondary Classroom' is a treasure trove of practical advice, tips, checklists, reproducibles, and ready-to-use activities that will save secondary teachers time and help them become more effective educators.
Main Description
Revised edition of the classic book on classroom management This third edition of Discipline in the Secondary Classroom is a treasure trove of practical advice, tips, checklists, reproducibles, and ready-to-use activities that will save secondary teachers time and help them become more effective educators. Both new and seasoned teachers will find the book invaluable for designing a management plan that prevents problems, motivates students, and teaches students to behave responsibly. Offers a proven classroom management plan based on Sprick's acclaimed STOIC framework for training teachers: Structure for success, Teach expectations, Observe and monitor, Interact positively, and Correct fluently Includes information on everything from creating a vision for classroom behavior to addressing misbehavior and motivating students Bonus DVD features video of Sprick explaining core practices This accessible, value-packed resource shows educators how to work with students to create a well-managed classroom where learning can flourish.
Main Description
Revised edition of the classic book on classroom management This third edition of Discipline in the Secondary Classroom is a treasure trove of practical advice, tips, checklists, reproducibles, and ready-to-use activities that will save secondary teachers time and help them become more effective educators. Both new and seasoned teachers will find the book invaluable for designing a management plan that prevents problems, motivates students, and teaches students to behave responsibly. Offers a proven classroom management plan based on Spricks acclaimed STOIC framework for training teachers: Structure for success, Teach expectations, Observe and monitor, Interact positively, and Correct fluently Includes information on everything from creating a vision for classroom behavior to addressing misbehavior and motivating students Bonus DVD features video of Sprick explaining core practices This accessible, value-packed resource shows educators how to work with students to create a well-managed classroom where learning can flourish.
Table of Contents
The Authorp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. viii
How to Use This Bookp. ix
DVD Contentsp. xviii
Forewordp. xxiii
Prefacep. xxv
Introductionp. 1
Structure Your Classroom for Successp. 5
Vision: Understand key concepts about managing student behaviorp. 7
Understand the Basic Principles of Behavior Modification and Your Role in That Processp. 8
Understand Motivation and the Variables That Can Be Manipulated to Increase Itp. 10
Develop and Implement Guidelines for Successp. 15
Maintain High Expectations for Students' Academic and Behavioral Performancep. 17
Initiate and Maintain Family Contactsp. 19
Initial Contactp. 21
Ongoing Contactp. 24
In Conclusionp. 25
Grading and Instruction: Design instruction and evaluation systemsp. 29
Develop Clear Goals for Each Class You Teachp. 30
Design Instruction and Evaluation Procedures That Create a Clear Relationship between Student Effort and Successp. 33
Establish a System to Provide Students Feedback on Behavior and Effort; Incorporate This into Your Grading Systemp. 37
Establish a Grade Percentage for Classroom Behavior or Effortp. 40
Determine the Approximate Number of Total Points Students May Earn During the Termp. 41
Determine the Approximate Number of Total Points Based on Behavior and Effortp. 42
Design an Efficient System for Monitoring and Recording Daily Classroom Behavior Pointsp. 43
Determine the Impact of Excused and Unexcused Absences on Your Grading of Behavior and Effortp. 46
Assign Weekly Performance Points and Provide Feedback to Studentsp. 47
Summary of Behavior Feedback Within Grading Systemsp. 48
Design Procedures for Students to Receive Feedback on Each Aspect of Their Behavioral and Academic Performance and to Know Their Current Gradesp. 49
Implement Effective Instructional Practicesp. 53
Teacher's Presentational Stylep. 54
Actively Involving Students in Lessonsp. 54
Ensuring High Rates of Student Successp. 54
Providing Students with Immediate Performance Feedbackp. 55
Present Desired Tasks to Your Students in a Manner That Will Generate Their Enthusiasmp. 55
In Conclusionp. 57
Organization: Prepare routines and proceduresp. 63
Arrange the Schedule of Activities for Each Class Period to Maximize Instructional Time and Responsible Behaviorp. 64
Arrange the Physical Space in Your Classroom to Promote Positive Student-Teacher Interactions and Reduce Disruptionp. 68
Decide on a Signal You Can Use to Immediately Quiet Your Students and Gain Their Full Attentionp. 74
Design Efficient, Effective Procedures for Beginning and Ending the Class Periodp. 76
Entering Classp. 77
Opening Activitiesp. 78
Materialsp. 80
Dealing with Students Returning after an Absencep. 82
End of Class or Periodp. 82
Dismissalp. 83
Design Effective, Efficient Procedures for Assigning, Monitoring, and Collecting Student Workp. 83
Assigning Classwork and Homeworkp. 84
Collecting Completed Workp. 86
Returning Graded Work to Studentsp. 87
Late or Missing Assignmentsp. 88
Manage Independent Work Periodsp. 89
In Conclusionp. 94
Classroom Management Plan: Plan to encourage responsible behavior and to respond consistently to student misbehaviorp. 101
Adjust the Structure of Your Management Plan Based on Your Needs and the Needs of Your Studentsp. 102
Consider Your Needsp. 103
Consider Your Students' Needsp. 105
Identify the Level of Structure You Will Usep. 108
Identify and Post Three to Six Classroom Rules That Will Be Used as a Basis for Providing Positive and Corrective Feedbackp. 109
Develop a Plan for Correcting Early-Stage Misbehaviorsp. 114
Proximityp. 115
Gentle Verbal Reprimandp. 116
Discussionp. 116
Family Contactp. 116
Humorp. 118
Restitutionp. 118
Conclusionp. 118
Develop Consequences for Rule Violationsp. 119
Loss of Pointp. 122
Time Owedp. 122
Time-Outp. 123
Restitutionp. 124
Detentionp. 124
Demeritsp. 124
Office Referralp. 125
Know When and When Not to Use Disciplinary Referralp. 125
In Conclusionp. 129
Teach Expectationsp. 133
Expectations: Plan to teach students how to be successfulp. 135
Define Clear and Consistent Behavioral Expectations for All Regularly Scheduled Classroom Activitiesp. 138
Define Clear and Consistent Behavioral Expectations for the Common Transitions, Both within and between Activities, That Occur during a Typical School Dayp. 160
Develop a Preliminary Plan, and Prepare Lessons for Teaching Your Expectations to Studentsp. 179
In Conclusionp. 187
Preparation and Launch: Pull it all together for the first dayp. 193
Finalize Your Classroom Management Plan, and Prepare to Communicate That Plan to Your Studentsp. 194
Complete Your Preparations for the First Dayp. 198
Implement Your Plan for the First Dayp. 200
Communicate Your Expectationsp. 202
Monitor Student Behaviorp. 203
Give Students Feedback on Their Implementation of Expectationsp. 204
Gradually Decrease the Amount of Time You Spend Teaching Expectations, Procedures, and Routinesp. 206
Mark on Your Planning Calendar Particular Times When You Will Reteach Your Expectationsp. 214
In Conclusionp. 217
Observe Student Behaviorp. 221
Monitor Student Behavior: Implement and adjust your classroom management planp. 223
Circulate When Possible, and Scan All Sections of the Classroom Continuouslyp. 224
Circulatingp. 224
Visual Scanningp. 225
Auditory Scanningp. 226
Collect Objective Data about Classroom Behavior, and Adjust Your Management Plan Accordinglyp. 226
Champs and Achieve versus Daily Reality Rating Scalesp. 229
Ratio of Interactions Monitoring Formsp. 234
Misbehavior Recording Sheetp. 239
Grade Book Analysis Worksheetp. 241
On-Task Behavior Observation Sheetp. 245
Opportunities to Respond Observation Sheetp. 247
Student Satisfaction Surveyp. 250
In Conclusionp. 254
Interact Positivelyp. 255
Motivation: Enhance students' desire to succeedp. 257
Understand the Importance of Building Personal Relationships with Studentsp. 258
Use Every Possible Opportunity to Provide Each Student with Noncontingent Attentionp. 258
Give Students Positive Feedback on Their Successes in a Variety of Waysp. 261
Plan to Interact at Least Three Times More Often with Students When They Are Behaving Appropriately Than When They Are Misbehavingp. 266
Effectively Employ a Classwide System or Systems If Needed to Increase Motivation and Responsible Behaviorp. 269
Identify Problems, Goals, Level of Structure Needed, and the Type of System You Will Usep. 270
Select a System and Prepare to Implement Itp. 277
Identify How You Will Maintain, Modify, and Fade a Reward-Based Systemp. 282
Menu of Classwide Systemsp. 285
Reward-Based Systems for High-Structure Classesp. 285
Reward-Based Systems for Medium-Structure Classesp. 288
Nonreward-Based Systems for Low-Structure Classesp. 291
In Conclusionp. 297
Correct Fluentlyp. 301
Proactive Planning for Chronic Misbehaviorp. 303
Use Effective Correction Techniquesp. 303
Addressing Chronic Misbehaviorp. 305
Analyze and, If Needed, Adjust the Implementation of Your Basic Management Planp. 307
Analyze and, If Needed, Adjust the Strategies You Are Using to Build a Positive Relationship with This Studentp. 313
Analyze the Misbehavior and Develop a Function-Based Interventionp. 317
Intervention Planning Stepsp. 320
Identify the target (problem) behavior and collect objective data; Use those data as you proceed to step 2p. 320
Develop a hypothesis (educated guess) about the function of the misbehaviorp. 324
Identify Any Specific Contexts or Conditions (Time, Locations, Tasks) When the Target Behavior Typically Occurs (or Does Not Occur)p. 326
Develop a Preliminary Behavior Change (Intervention) Plan Based on Your Hypothesis about the Function of the Misbehavior and Your Understanding of When (Under What Conditions) the Behavior Typically Occursp. 326
Develop an Intervention for Awareness-Type Misbehaviorsp. 328
Make Sure the Student Knows What Behavior You Expect Her to Exhibit (the Target or Coal Behavior)p. 328
Respond to Instances of the Misbehavior in a Manner That Lets the Student Know That She Is Not Meeting the Goalp. 330
Monitor the Students Behavior So That You and the Student Will Have an Objective Basis for Discussing Progressp. 331
Provide Positive Feedback When the Student Improvesp. 333
Develop an Intervention for Ability-Type Misbehaviorsp. 334
At a Neutral Time, Have a Discussion and Provide Information That Teaches the Replacement Behaviorp. 335
Correct Errors in a Manner That Provides Instructionp. 335
Make Accommodations to Increase the Student's Chance of Successp. 335
Provide Positive Feedback When the Student Is Successful or Improvesp. 336
Develop an Intervention for Attention-Seeking Misbehaviorsp. 336
Determine Whether Ignoring Is an Appropriate Responsep. 337
Discuss the Proposed Plan with the Studentp. 338
When the Misbehavior Occurs, Continue What You Are Doing and Provide Positive Feedback to Other Studentsp. 339
When the Attention-Seeking Misbehavior Ceases, Give the Student Attentionp. 340
Maintain Frequent Interactions with the Student When He Is Not Misbehavingp. 340
Monitor the Students Behavior to Determine Whether Progress Is Being Madep. 340
Develop an Intervention for Habitual and Purposeful Types of Misbehaviorsp. 340
Remove Any Positive or Satisfying Aspects of Demonstrating the Misbehaviorp. 341
Demonstrate to the Student That Positive Behavior Leads to Positive Resultsp. 341
Respond to the Misbehavior by Assigning Appropriate Corrective Consequencesp. 344
Implement the Intervention Plan for Purposeful/Habitual Misbehaviorp. 347
Discuss Your Preliminary Intervention Plan with the Student and, If Appropriate, the Students Familyp. 348
Implement the Intervention Plan for at Least Two Weeks; Continue to Collect Data on the Target Behavior to Evaluate the Plan's Effectivenessp. 349
In Conclusionp. 350
The Evidence Base behind Discipline in the Secondary Classroomp. 355
Schoolwide Implementation of Discipline in the Secondary Classroomp. 361
Cultural Competencep. 369
Professionalism for the First-Year Teacherp. 373
Mapping Discipline in the Secondary Classroom to a Framework for Teachingp. 383
CHAMPS Iconsp. 393
Referencesp. 403
Name Indexp. 415
Subject Indexp. 423
How to Use the DVDp. 435
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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