Catalogue

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The grotesque in contemporary British fiction /
Robert Duggan.
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed in the U.S. exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
description
276 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0719078911 (hbk.), 9780719078910 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed in the U.S. exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
isbn
0719078911 (hbk.)
9780719078910 (hbk.)
catalogue key
9100870
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [254]-272) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
'Chapmans' Dead Guys' by The Little Artists, after Jake and Dinos Chapman, after Goya
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text shows how the grotesque continues to be a powerful force in contemporary British writing and provides an illuminating picture of often controversial aspects of recent fiction.
Long Description
The Grotesque in British fiction reveals the extent to which the grotesque endures as a dominant artistic mode in contemporary British fiction and offers a new way of understanding six authors who have been at the forefront of British literature over the past four decades: Angela Carter, Martin Amis, Ian McEwan, Iain Banks, Will Self and Toby Litt. The well-established and continued influence of this group of writers on their contemporaries is difficult to overstate and this book comprises the first serious critical attempt to apprehend their work through the discourse of the grotesque. While scholarly criticism has sometimes touched upon these authors' interest in shocking images or taboo subjects, this work explores how sometimes controversial aspects of the authors' works derive from important debates that have a fascinating history in artistic and literary discourse. By outlining the aesthetic trajectories of each writer and offering detailed critical readings of key works including Angela Carter's The Bloody Chamber (1979), Martin Amis's Money (1984), Ian McEwan's The Child in Time (1987), Iain Banks's The Wasp Factory (1984), Will Self's Great Apes (1997) and Toby Litt's Ghost Story (2004), this book shows how the grotesque continues to be a powerful force in contemporary writing. The book sheds light on how these writers share a strong connection to a British tradition of the grotesque that goes back to Charles Dickens, Henry Fielding and Jonathan Swift as well as producing compelling and distinctive visions of contemporary life.
Long Description
The grotesque in contemporary British fiction reveals the extent to which the grotesque endures as a dominant artistic mode in contemporary British fiction and offers a new way of understanding six authors who have been at the forefront of British literature over the past four decades: Angela Carter, Martin Amis, Ian McEwan, Iain Banks, Will Self and Toby Litt. The well-established and continued influence of this group of writers on their contemporaries is difficult to overstate and this book comprises the first serious critical attempt to apprehend their work through the discourse of the grotesque. While scholarly criticism has sometimes touched upon these authors' interest in shocking images or taboo subjects, this work explores how sometimes controversial aspects of the authors' works derive from important debates that have a fascinating history in artistic and literary discourse. By outlining the aesthetic trajectories of each writer and offering detailed critical readings of key works including Angela Carter's The Bloody Chamber (1979), Martin Amis's Money (1984), Ian McEwan's The Child in Time (1987), Iain Banks's The Wasp Factory (1984), Will Self's Great Apes (1997) and Toby Litt's Ghost Story (2004), this book shows how the grotesque continues to be a powerful force in contemporary writing. The book sheds light on how these writers share a strong connection to a British tradition of the grotesque that goes back to Charles Dickens, Henry Fielding and Jonathan Swift as well as producing compelling and distinctive visions of contemporary life.
Main Description
The grotesque in contemporary British fiction reveals the extent to which the grotesque endures as a dominant artistic mode in British fiction and presents a new way of understanding six authors who have been at the forefront of British literature over the past four decades. Starting with a sophisticated exploration of the historical development of the grotesque in literature, the book outlines the aesthetic trajectories of Angela Carter, Martin Amis, Ian McEwan, Iain Banks, Will Self and Toby Litt and offers detailed critical readings of key works of modern fiction including The Bloody Chamber (1979), Money (1984), The Child in Time (1987), The Wasp Factory (1984), Great Apes (1997) and Ghost Story (2004). The book shows how the grotesque continues to be a powerful force in contemporary writing and provides an illuminating picture of often controversial aspects of recent fiction.

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