Catalogue


Alger Hiss, Whittaker Chambers and the case that ignited McCarthyism /
Lewis Hartshorn.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. ; London : McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, [2013], c2013
description
viii, 218 p. : ill. ; 26 cm
ISBN
0786474424 (softcover : alk. paper), 9780786474424 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. ; London : McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, [2013], c2013
isbn
0786474424 (softcover : alk. paper)
9780786474424 (softcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Enemies within -- Richard Nixon ascending -- Close friends -- Star chamber -- HUAC questions Hiss privately -- Showdown at the Hotel Commodore -- "The truth doesn't matter" -- Wall Street lawyer -- Confrontation under klieg lights -- Libel: Hiss v. Chambers -- Comrade Carl -- Saint Whittaker -- Suicide watch.
abstract
"History of Alger Hiss-Whittaker Chambers controversy of 1948-50 in which Chambers claimed Hiss passed him documents in 1937 and 1938 for Soviet Union. Jury records unsealed in 1999 lead to the conclusion that stories Whittaker Chambers told the authorities about himself and Alger Hiss as confederates in the Communist underground of the 1930s are fraudulent"--
catalogue key
9100408
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 212-213) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Lewis Hartshorn is an independent scholar who lives on the Texas Gulf Coast.
Summaries
Main Description
This is a history of the Alger Hiss-Whittaker Chambers controversy of 1948 to 1950, a federal criminal case in which Hiss was convicted of perjury after two long trials. Chambers claimed that Hiss had passed classified State Department documents to him in 1937 and 1938 for transmittal to the Soviet Union. Hiss denied the charges but was found guilty at his second trial (the jury could not reach a decision in the first). Hiss was not charged with espionage because of the statute of limitations.The main focus of this narrative focuses on the early months of the affair, from August 1948 when Whittaker Chambers appeared before the House Committee on Un-American Activities and publicly denounced Hiss and several others as underground Communists who had infiltrated the government in the 1930s, to the following December when Hiss was indicted for perjury. The author believes the truth emerges as the story unfolds during these months, based in part on grand jury records unsealed by court order in 1999, leading to the conclusion that the stories Whittaker Chambers told the authorities and later published about himself and Alger Hiss as confederates in the Communist underground of the 1930s are completely fraudulent.
Main Description
This is a consensus challenging history of the Alger Hiss-Whittaker Chambers controversy of 1948 to 1950, a criminal case in which Hiss was convicted of perjury after two long trials. Chambers claimed that Hiss had passed classified State Department documents to him in 1937 and 1938 for transmittal to the Soviet Union. Hiss denied the charges but was found guilty at his second trial (the jury could not reach a decision in the first). Hiss was not charged with espionage because of the statute of limitations.The main focus of this narrative concentrates on the early months of the affair, from August 1948 when Chambers appeared before the House Committee on Un-American Activities and denounced Hiss and several others as underground Communists, to the following December when Hiss was indicted for perjury. The truth emerges as the story unfolds, based in part on grand jury records unsealed by court order in 1999, leading to the conclusion that the stories Whittaker Chambers told the authorities and later published about himself and Alger Hiss in the Communist underground are completely fraudulent.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. viii
Prefacep. 1
Enemies Withinp. 3
Richard Nixon Ascendingp. 10
Close Friendsp. 19
Star Chamberp. 27
HUAC Questions Hiss Privatelyp. 45
Showdown at the Hotel Commodorep. 54
"The Truth Doesn't Matter"p. 64
Wall Street Lawyerp. 74
Confrontation Under Klieg Lightsp. 108
Libel: Hiss v. Chambersp. 118
Comrade Carlp. 128
Saint Whittakerp. 142
Suicide Watchp. 165
Appendix: Adolf Berle Notes of Meeting with Whittaker Chambers, September 2, 1939p. 195
Chapter Notesp. 209
Bibliographyp. 212
Indexp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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