Catalogue


Black Germany : the making and unmaking of a diaspora community, 1884-1960 /
Robbie Aitken and Eve Rosenhaft.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
description
xvi, 364 p.
ISBN
1107041368 (hardback), 9781107041363 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
isbn
1107041368 (hardback)
9781107041363 (hardback)
contents note
The first generation : from presence to community -- Should I stay and can I go? : status and mobility in the institutional net -- Settling down : marriage and family -- Surviving in Germany : work, welfare and community -- Problem men and exemplary women? : gender, class and "race" -- Practising diaspora--politics 1918-1933 -- Under the shadow of national socialism -- Refuge France?.
catalogue key
9093900
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 329-353) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'With painstaking and imaginative research, Robbie Aitken and Eve Rosenhaft have reconstructed the lives of individual Africans across multiple colonial regimes, from the German Empire to the French League of Nations mandate, and multiple German regimes, from the Kaiserreich to the Third Reich. Black Germany makes an important and persuasive argument about the emergence of a black German community and identity from the intersection of specific African and German histories. It shows that becoming black - that is, self-consciously part of an international community defined by 'race' - intersects with more particular and local historical entanglements. This is an important work of transnational history.' Andrew Zimmerman, George Washington University
Advance praise: 'This is a very impressive book that provides fascinating information about the everyday lives of Africans in Germany and sheds new light on a hitherto unknown episode of twentieth-century history. It also makes a more general argument about race, community and Diaspora, based on painstaking archival research.' Andreas Eckert, Humboldt-Universitt zu Berlin
Advance praise: 'With painstaking and imaginative research, Robbie Aitken and Eve Rosenhaft have reconstructed the lives of individual Africans across multiple colonial regimes, from the German Empire to the French League of Nations mandate, and multiple German regimes, from the Kaiserreich to the Third Reich. Black Germany makes an important and persuasive argument about the emergence of a black German community and identity from the intersection of specific African and German histories. It shows that becoming black - that is, self-consciously part of an international community defined by 'race' - intersects with more particular and local historical entanglements. This is an important work of transnational history.' Andrew Zimmerman, George Washington University
'This is a very impressive book that provides fascinating information about the everyday lives of Africans in Germany and sheds new light on a hitherto unknown episode of twentieth-century history. It also makes a more general argument about race, community and Diaspora, based on painstaking archival research.' Andreas Eckert, Humboldt-Universit├Ąt zu Berlin
Advance praise: 'This is a very impressive book that provides fascinating information about the everyday lives of Africans in Germany and sheds new light on a hitherto unknown episode of twentieth-century history. It also makes a more general argument about race, community and Diaspora, based on painstaking archival research.' Andreas Eckert, Humboldt-Universit├Ąt zu Berlin
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This rich and detailed account traces the development of Germany's black community, from its origins in colonial Africa to its decimation by the Nazis during World War II. Robbie Aitken and Eve Rosenhaft draw on meticulous research to offer exciting new perspectives on transnational German history.
Main Description
This ground-breaking history traces the development of Germany's black community, from its origins in colonial Africa to its decimation by the Nazis during World War II. Robbie Aitken and Eve Rosenhaft follow the careers of Africans arriving from the colonies, examining why and where they settled, their working lives and their political activities, and giving unprecedented attention to gender, sexuality and the challenges of 'mixed marriage'. Addressing the networks through which individuals constituted community, Aitken and Rosenhaft explore the ways in which these relationships spread beyond ties of kinship and birthplace to constitute communities as 'black'. The study also follows a number of its protagonists to France and back to Africa, providing new insights into the roots of Francophone black consciousness and post-colonial memory. Including an in-depth account of the impact of Nazism and its aftermath, this book offers a fresh critical perspective on narratives of 'race' in German history.

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