Catalogue


Beyond the Second Sophistic : adventures in Greek postclassicism /
Tim Whitmarsh.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, [2013], c2013
description
xiii, 278 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520276817 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780520276819 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, [2013], c2013
isbn
0520276817 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780520276819 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Beyond the Second Sophistic, into the post-classical -- Fiction beyond the canon. The "invention of fiction" -- The romance of genre -- Belief in fiction: Euhemerus and the sacred inscription -- An I for an I: reading fictional autobiography -- Metamorphoses of The ass -- Addressing power: fictional letters between Darius and Alexander -- Philostratus' heroicus: fictions of Hellenism -- Mimesis and the gendered icon in Greek theory and fiction -- Poetry and prose. Greek poets and Roman patrons in the Late Republic and Early Empire: Crinagoras, antipater and others on Rome -- The Cretan lyre paradox: Mesomedes, Hadrian and the poetics of patronage -- Lucianic paratragedy -- Quickening the classics: the politics of prose in Roman Greece -- Beyond the Greek sophistic. Politics and identity in Ezekiel's Exagoge -- Adventures of the Solymoi.
catalogue key
9093858
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 249-273) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"As the premier authority of Greek literature under Rome, Tim Whitmarsh redefines the literary history of the period and extends a challenge to anyone who would care or dare to follow in his adventurous wake." --James I. Porter, University of California, Irvine, author of The Origins of Aesthetic Thought in Ancient Greece "Whitmarsh's forays into the fringes of the canon demonstrate the richness and variety of post-classical culture, as well as the great amount of interest inherent in texts that lie 'beyond the Second Sophistic'. Essential reading." --Lawrence Kim, Trinity University, author of Homer between History and Fiction in Imperial Greek Literature
Summaries
Main Description
The "Second Sophistic" traditionally refers to a period at the height of the Roman Empires power that witnessed a flourishing of Greek rhetoric and oratory, and since the 19th century it has often been viewed as a defense of Hellenic civilization against the domination of Rome. This book proposes a very different model. Covering popular fiction, poetry and Greco-Jewish material, it argues for a rich, dynamic, and diverse culture, which cannot be reduced to a simple model of continuity. Shining new light on a series of playful, imaginative texts that are left out of the traditional accounts of Greek literature, Whitmarsh models a more adventurous, exploratory approach to later Greek culture. "Beyond the Second Sophistic" offers not only a new way of looking at Greek literature from 300 BCE onwards, but also a challenge to the Eurocentric, aristocratic constructions placed on the Greek heritage. Accessible and lively, it will appeal to students and scholars of Greek literature and culture, Hellenistic Judaism, world literature, and cultural theory.
Main Description
The "Second Sophistic" traditionally refers to a period at the height of the Roman Empire's power that witnessed a flourishing of Greek rhetoric and oratory, and since the 19th century it has often been viewed as a defense of Hellenic civilization against the domination of Rome. This book proposes a very different model. Covering popular fiction, poetry and Greco-Jewish material, it argues for a rich, dynamic and diverse culture, which cannot be reduced to a simple model of continuity. Shining new light on a series of playful, imaginative texts that are left out of the traditional accounts of Greek literature, Whitmarsh models a more adventurous, exploratory approach to later Greek culture. Beyond the Second Sophistic offers not only a new way of looking at Greek literature from 300 BCE onwards, but also a challenge to the Eurocentric, aristocratic constructions placed on the Greek heritage. Accessible and lively, it will appeal to students and scholars of Greek literature and culture, Hellenistic Judaism, world literature, and cultural theory.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Abbreviationsp. xi
Introduction: Beyond the Second Sophistic and into the Postclassicalp. 1
Fiction Beyond the Canon
The "Invention of Fiction"p. 11
The Romance of Genrep. 35
Belief in Fiction: Euhemerus of Messene and the Sacred Inscriptionp. 49
An I for an I: Reading Fictional Autobiographyp. 63
Metamorphoses of the Assp. 75
Addressing Power: Fictional Letters between Alexander and Dariusp. 86
PhilostratusÆs Heroicus: Fictions of Hellenismp. 101
Mimesis and the Gendered Icon in Greek Theory and Fictionp. 123
Poetry and Prose
Greek Poets and Roman Patrons in the Late Republic and Early Empirep. 137
The Cretan Lyre Paradox: Mesomedes, Hadrian, and the Poetics of Patronagep. 154
Lucianic Paratragedyp. 176
Quickening the Classics: The Politics of Prose in Roman Greecep. 186
Beyond the Greek Sophistic
Politics and Identity in Ezekiel's Exagogep. 211
Adventures of the Solymoip. 228
Referencesp. 249
Indexp. 275
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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