Catalogue


"Collecting stamps would have been more fun" [electronic resource] : Canadian publishing and the correspondence of Sinclair Ross, 1933-1986 /
selected and with an introduction by Jordan Stouck ; annotations by David Stouck.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Edmonton : University of Alberta Press, c2010.
description
xxxiii, 303 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
088864521X, 9780888645210 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Edmonton : University of Alberta Press, c2010.
isbn
088864521X
9780888645210 (pbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
9088982
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 273-280) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jordan Stouck teaches discourse analysis at the University of British Columbia (Okanagan), with a particular interest in Canadian and Caribbean diasporic cultures and the history of Canadian literature. David Stouck is Professor Emeritus, Simon Fraser University. He has written biographies of Ethel Wilson and Sinclair Ross and has edited a collection of Ross criticism for University of Toronto Press.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Although there is a Sinclair Ross fonds at the Canadian Library and Archives, it contains very little of his correspondence. In producing this collection of letters, Jordan Stouck provides scholars with access to an excellent range of letters that would otherwise remain scattered over a dozen archives, both public and private.... Besides the insights this collection of letters provides into the Canadian publishing scene, its greatest insights are into Ross himself. Ross rarely agreed to talk publicly about his work, having given only one official interview in his life. These letters allow readers a rare glimpse of who Ross was, written in his own words... David Stouck does a commendable job of contextualizing any missing correspondence and providing other relevant information in footnotes.... [I]t is clear that this collection of letters is a contribution to the history of publishing in Canada as well as Ross scholarship." Christopher Doody, Trent University, American Journals, Fall 2012
"This collection of extant letters, from Atwood to Wiseman and many others,are from friends, fellow writers, and editor-publishers, and their repliesfrom Sinclair Ross (1908-1996). The correspondence is arranged according tothe five major periods of his writing life.... Much can be gleaned fromthese writings, not only biographical facts but, perhaps more importantly,about his creative process.... University of Alberta Press has madeavailable to a new generation Ross's seminal work, with new introductions[Sawbones Memorial, The Well, and Whir of Gold].... The present collectionof correspondence more than adequately complements the fiction and makesavailable original, previously unpublished, primary materials." Anne Burke,Prairie Journal, January 2011
"This is a welcome volume with much to offer for students of Ross as well as of Canadianliterature and publishing. The letters make an engaging and rewarding read."Hugh Mellon, University of Western Ontario, British Journal of Canadian Studies Vol. 25, No. 1, 2012
"While these letters tell us much about Ross and his painstaking construction of a slender but indisputably enduring oeuvre, an array of exceptional short stories and the matchless novels As For Me and My House and Sawbones Memorial, they say as much or more about the daunting complexities of finding a place for any significant literary achievement in a national publishing industry itself in a formative and generally derivative state.... [T]his fine collaborative enterprise takes us first into the life of a now prominent national artist 'like the now celebrated Emily Carr' who 'found an audience only late,' and thence beyond into the convolutions of a relentless striving for recognition from a publishing milieu either oblivious, or indifferent, or at best casually receptive to the aspirations of a writer fixated upon rendering the people and environment of depression-era rural Saskatchewan within a more universal and timeless context." - Wilf Cude The Antigonish Review November 2011
Many books of letters are scattershot, unfocused affairs. But these letters of Canlit pioneer Sinclair Ross are compelling and laid out like a story.As selected, arranged and annotated by B.C. academics (and daughter and father) Jordan and David Stouck, they build to a jarring and poignant climax, so that the collection reads like a novel. A tragic novel.” Jonathan Ball, Winnipeg Free Press, September 19, 2010
"The editors present this collection of letters from, to, and sometimes about, Ross as an illustration of the growth of Canadian publishing between the 1930s and the 1980s. But, from the title quotation onwards, it is Ross's personality that dominates the book." - Times Literary Supplement (UK) October 29, 2010
"...the Stoucks' effort succeeds in illuminating the publishing record of one of Canada's most secretive authors.... Most striking is Jordan Stouck's note-perfect introduction, one that is academically rigorous yet free of jargon and platitudes.... [T]he book's contents reveal a complex and conflicted man who certainly affected many of those close and not-so-close to him. Furthermore, reading Ross's letters is often akin to the experience of reading Ross at his finest.... Ross's perfect rhythm and distilled analysis are pleasure unto themselves.... [F]or those of us who have always wanted more of Ross's talent, then this fine, revealing book will more than suffice." Andrew Lesk, Great Plains Quarterly
“’Collecting Stamps Would Have Been More Fun’...is a line from one of Ross’ letters in which [the venerable writer] describes his lifetime of struggling for recognition, ultimately dying in relative obscurity in Vancouver.... And he was a guy who wrote a classic, a book that has been required reading on high school reading lists for more than two decades, dating back to the 1940s." Sheila Munro, BC Bookworld, June 2010
’Collecting Stamps Would Have Been More Fun’...is a line from one of Ross’ letters in which [the venerable writer] describes his lifetime of struggling for recognition, ultimately dying in relative obscurity in Vancouver.... And he was a guy who wrote a classic, a book that has been required reading on high school reading lists for more than two decades, dating back to the 1940s." Sheila Munro, BC Bookworld, June 2010
"Collecting Stamps Would Have Been More Fun is the first published selection of letters by, to, and about Sinclair Ross; and it is a particularly welcome new resource because Ross was a publicly shy man, little known to his readers.... [Jordan Stouck] includes about a third of the available letters, well selected for their 'literary and biographical interest,' and adds a transcript of the only formal interview Ross ever granted (xxv). In her introduction, she supplies biographical context and continuity especially helpful to those who have not read the biography.... At the foot of each letter, readers will find David Stouck#146;s often remarkably resourceful noteswaiting to explain any obscure or quizzical references in the texts.... Most significantly, these letters bring us Sinclair Ross with a new immediacy and vitality. Especially in his exchanges with fellow writers such as Margaret Laurence, Ross opens up--revealing his beliefs, his humor, and, gradually, his personality.... Ross emerges as an astute, articulate, and forthright commentator, joining the critical controversies about his own work.... Jordan and David Stouck have given us an important and highly readable bookoffering new insights into the life and writing of one of our finestCanadian and western writers. Dick Harrison, Western American Literature, [Full review at: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/western_american_literature/v046/46.2.harrison.html]"
“Many books of letters are scattershot, unfocused affairs. But these letters of Canlit pioneer Sinclair Ross are compelling and laid out like a story.As selected, arranged and annotated by B.C. academics (and daughter and father) Jordan and David Stouck, they build to a jarring and poignant climax, so that the collection reads like a novel. A tragic novel.” Jonathan Ball, Winnipeg Free Press, September 19, 2010
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This unique exchange of letters between literary icon Sinclair Ross and several prominent writers, publishers, agents, and editors asks why many Canadian artists, especially those in western provinces, spent a lifetime struggling for recognition and remuneration. Featuring exchanges with Earle Birney, Margaret Laurence, and Margaret Atwood, among others, this collection exposes the conditions of cultural work in Canada for much of the twentieth century. This vivid, often moving, selection of professional and personal letters, plus the only formal interview Ross ever gave, provides a valuable resource for those engaged with the history of publishing in Canada, as well as for those with an interest in Canadian literature.
Main Description
This unique exchange of letters between literary icon Sinclair Ross and several prominent writers, publishers, agents, and editors asks why many Canadian artists, especially those in western provinces, spent a lifetime struggling for recognition and remuneration. Featuring exchanges with Earle Birney, Margaret Laurence, and Margaret Atwood, among others, this collection exposes the conditions of cultural work in Canada for much of the twentieth century. This vivid, often moving, selection of professional and personal letters, plus the only formal interview Ross ever gave, provides a valuable resource for those engaged with the history of publishing in Canada, as well as for those with an interest in Canadian literature. [133 words]
Main Description
This collection includes letters from Sinclair Ross to other writers and literary figures, primarily Canadian, as well as many of their replies to him. His selected correspondence shows the artistic and professional concerns and issues faced by Ross as he attempted to become a successful writer. It also provides a rare insight into how Canadian literature developed from a marginal literature to a well-respected international one. The letters make for terrific reading, while the annotations are impressive and thorough. The chronological arrangement of letters shows the arc and development of Ross's career, as well as showcasing Canada's literary history.
Long Description
This unique exchange of letters between literary icon Sinclair Ross and several prominent writers, publishers, agents, and editors asks why many Canadian artists, especially those in western provinces, spent a lifetime struggling for recognition and remuneration. Featuring exchanges with Earle Birney, Margaret Laurence, and Margaret Atwood, among others, this collection exposes the conditions of cultural work in Canada for much of the twentieth century and includes the only interview Ross ever gave. The letters, both personal and professional, are vivid, often moving, and make for terrific reading. But they go further: their chronological arrangement reveals not only the arc and development of Ross’s career but the way Canadian writing as a whole grew from a marginal literature to a well-respected international one. Correspondents include:Margaret Atwood, Earle Birney, Ernest Buckler, George Herbert Clarke, Pamela Fry, John Gray, Ralph Gustafson, Margaret Laurence, Myrna Kostash, Jack McClelland, Ken Mitchell, John Moss, Andy Suknaski, Guy Vanderhaeghe, Robert Weaver, Adele Wiseman, and many others.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This collection includes letters from Sinclair Ross to other writers and literary figures, primarily Canadian, as well as many of their replies to him. His selected correspondence shows the artistic and professional concerns and issues faced by Ross as he attempted to become a successful writer.
Back Cover Copy
This unique exchange of letters between literary icon Sinclair Ross and several prominent writers, publishers, agents, and editors asks why many Canadian artists, especially those in western provinces, spent a lifetime struggling for recognition and remuneration. Collecting Stamps features exchanges with many of Canada’s leading writers and publishers. In their letters, the correspondents expose the conditions of cultural work in Canada for much of the twentieth century. This vivid, often moving, selection of professional and personal letters, plus the only formal interview Ross ever gave, provides a valuable resource for those engaged with the history of publishing in Canada, as well as for those with an interest in Canadian literature.Correspondents include:Margaret Atwood, Earle Birney, Ernest Buckler, George Herbert Clarke, Pamela Fry, John Gray, Ralph Gustafson, Margaret Laurence, Myrna Kostash, Jack McClelland, Ken Mitchell, John Moss, Andy Suknaski, Guy Vanderhaeghe, Robert Weaver, Adele Wiseman, and many others.Jordan Stouck teaches discourse analysis at the University of British Columbia (Okanagan), with a particular interest in Canadian and Caribbean diasporic cultures and the history of Canadian literature.David Stouck is Professor Emeritus, Simon Fraser University. He has written biographies of Ethel Wilson and Sinclair Ross and has edited a collection of Ross criticism for University of Toronto Press.
Back Cover Copy
This unique exchange of letters between literary icon Sinclair Ross and several prominent writers, publishers, agents, and editors asks why many Canadian artists, especially those in western provinces, spent a lifetime struggling for recognition and remuneration. Collecting Stamps features exchanges with many of Canada’s leading writers and publishers. In their letters, the correspondents expose the conditions of cultural work in Canada for much of the twentieth century. This vivid, often moving, selection of professional and personal letters, plus the only formal interview Ross ever gave, provides a valuable resource for those engaged with the history of publishing in Canada, as well as for those with an interest in Canadian literature.Correspondents include:Margaret Atwood, Earle Birney, Ernest Buckler, George Herbert Clarke, Pamela Fry, John Gray, Ralph Gustafson, Margaret Laurence, Myrna Kostash, Jack McClelland, Ken Mitchell, John Moss, Andy Suknaski, Guy Vanderhaeghe, Robert Weaver, Adele Wiseman, and many others.Jordan Stouck teaches discourse analysis at the University of British Columbia (Okanagan), with a particular interest in Canadian and Caribbean diasporic cultures and the history of Canadian literature.David Stouck is Professor Emeritus, Simon Fraser University. He has written biographies of Ethel Wilson and Sinclair Ross and has edited a collection of Ross criticism for University of Toronto Press.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. VII
Introductionp. IX
Abbreviationsp. XXIX
Chronologyp. XXXI
American Dream: Letters 1933-1945 (short stories and As for Me and My House)p. 1
Canadian Failure: Letters 1946-1960 (short stories and The Well)p. 41
ôModest Hopesö: Letters 1962-1971 (Whir of Gold)p. 91
Succès d'estime: Letters 1972-1974 (Sawbones Memorial)p. 137
Literary Forefather: Letters 1975-1986p. 193
Appendix: Interview with Sinclair Ross, 1971p. 259
Archival Sourcesp. 273
Indexp. 281
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem