Catalogue


The end of plagues : the global battle against infectious disease /
John Rhodes.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
description
xii, 235 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
1137278528 (hbk.), 9781137278524 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
isbn
1137278528 (hbk.)
9781137278524 (hbk.)
contents note
The power of the invisible -- Circassian beauties and pioneering women -- The making of Jenner -- Why not try the experiment? -- The fourth achievement -- The foundling voyages -- The teeming humanity of nations -- A great and loud commotion -- Completing the picture -- Germ theory and the birth of immunology -- Victorious weapons against illness and death -- First light on the mystery of infantile paralysis -- Yearning to breathe free -- A great step forward -- Great themes and dirty little secrets -- The war on influenza -- Forged in the crucible of war -- Smallpox in a land of ancient wisdom -- The final defeat of smallpox -- Invisible weapons of war -- Benefits, risks, and fears -- Inspiration in the global village -- A team of many colors -- The milkmaid and the cuckoo.
abstract
"At the turn of the twentieth century, smallpox claimed the lives of two million people per year. By 1979, the disease had been eradicated and victory was declared across the globe. Yet the story of smallpox remains the exception, as today a host of deadly contagions, from polio to AIDS, continue to threaten human health around the world. Spanning three centuries, The End of Plagues weaves together the discovery of vaccination, the birth and growth of immunology, and the fight to eradicate the world's most feared diseases. From Edward Jenner's discovery of vaccination in 1796, to the early nineteenth-century foundling voyages in which chains of orphans, vaccinated one by one, were sent to colonies around the globe, to the development of polio vaccines and the stockpiling of smallpox as a biological weapon in the Cold War, world-renown immunologist John Rhodes charts our fight against these plagues, and shows how vaccinations gave humanity the upper hand. Today, aid groups including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the World Health Organization have made the eradication of polio a priority, and Rhodes takes us behind the scenes to witness the hard-fought battles of scientist, philanthropists, volunteers, and more, and how soon we may be celebrating the eradication of a second infectious disease, polio"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
9086113
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [221]-226) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2013-09-01:
Immunologist Rhodes (fellow, Royal Coll. of Pathologists) has crafted an engaging and accessible history of vaccines, including those for smallpox, polio, and rabies. His timely discussion of the challenges of smallpox eradication (the disease was eradicated in 1979, though the threat of its use in bioterrorism remains) sheds light on the unfinished task of eradicating polio and malaria and the insufficient efforts at making HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis vaccines and treatments available. The more than 20 vaccines available today have reduced the incidence and fear of these once terrifying infectious diseases, particularly in first-world countries, but their threat to global health should not be underestimated. Rhodes's review of antivaccine protests (and riots) is helpful for understanding current events. Almost all medical treatments carry some risk, and populations rely on herd immunity (i.e., a critical mass of a community) for protection from infectious diseases. Related and complementary titles include Seth Mnookin's The Panic Virus and the 2013 reference work The History of Vaccines by Karie Youngdahl, et al. VERDICT This highly recommended work offers valuable, nuanced information to readers interested in public health policies and individual health decisions.-Mary Chitty, Cambridge Healthtech, Needham, MA (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, September 2013
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Spanning three centuries, 'The End of Plagues' weaves together the discovery of vaccination, the birth and growth of immunology, and the fight to eradicate the world's most feared diseases.
Description for Bookstore
An absorbing history of the battle against the world's deadliest diseases and how today's scientists are racing against the clock to eradicate these viruses once and for all
Library of Congress Summary
"At the turn of the twentieth century, smallpox claimed the lives of two million people per year. By 1979, the disease had been eradicated and victory was declared across the globe. Yet the story of smallpox remains the exception, as today a host of deadly contagions, from polio to AIDS, continue to threaten human health around the world. Spanning three centuries, The End of Plagues weaves together the discovery of vaccination, the birth and growth of immunology, and the fight to eradicate the world's most feared diseases. From Edward Jenner's discovery of vaccination in 1796, to the early nineteenth-century foundling voyages in which chains of orphans, vaccinated one by one, were sent to colonies around the globe, to the development of polio vaccines and the stockpiling of smallpox as a biological weapon in the Cold War, world-renown immunologist John Rhodes charts our fight against these plagues, and shows how vaccinations gave humanity the upper hand. Today, aid groups including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the World Health Organization have made the eradication of polio a priority, and Rhodes takes us behind the scenes to witness the hard-fought battles of scientist, philanthropists, volunteers, and more, and how soon we may be celebrating the eradication of a second infectious disease, polio"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
An absorbing history of the battle against the world's deadliest scourges, including smallpox and polio, and how today's scientists are racing against the clock to eradicate humanity's more feared viruses once and for allAt the turn of the twentieth century, smallpox claimed the lives of two million people per year. By 1979, the disease had been eradicated and victory was declared across the globe. Yet the story of smallpox remains the exception, as today a host of deadly contagions, from polio to AIDS, continue to threaten human health around the world. Spanning three centuries, The End of Plagues weaves together the discovery of vaccination, the birth and growth of immunology, and the fight to eradicate the world's most feared diseases. From Edward Jenner's discovery of vaccination in 1796, to the early nineteenth-century foundling voyages in which chains of orphans, vaccinated one by one, were sent to colonies around the globe, to the development of polio vaccines and the stockpiling of smallpox as a biological weapon in the Cold War, world-renown immunologist John Rhodes charts our fight against these plagues, and shows how vaccinations gave humanity the upper hand. Today, aid groups including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the World Health Organization have made the eradication of polio a priority, and Rhodes takes us behind the scenes to witness how soon we may be celebrating the eradication of polio.
Main Description
An absorbing history of the battle against the world's deadliest scourges, including smallpox and polio, and how today's scientists are racing against the clock to eradicate humanity's more feared viruses once and for allAt the turn of the twentieth century, smallpox claimed the lives of two million people per year. By 1979, the disease had been eradicated and victory was declared across the globe. Yet the story of smallpox remains the exception, as today a host of deadly contagions, from polio to AIDS, continue to threaten human health around the world. Spanning three centuries, The End of Plagues weaves together the discovery of vaccination, the birth and growth of immunology, and the fight to eradicate the world's most feared diseases. From Edward Jenner's discovery of vaccination in 1796, to the early nineteenth-century foundling voyages in which chains of orphans, vaccinated one by one, were sent to colonies around the globe, to the development of polio vaccines and the stockpiling of smallpox as a biological weapon in the Cold War, world-renown immunologist John Rhodes charts ourfight against these plagues, and shows how vaccinations gave humanity the upper hand. Today, aid groups including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the World Health Organization have made the eradication of polio a priority, and Rhodes takes us behind the scenes to witness how soon we may be celebrating the eradication of polio.
Main Description
At the turn of the twentieth century, smallpox claimed the lives of two million people per year. By 1979, the disease had been eradicated and victory was declared across the globe. Yet the story of smallpox remains the exception, as today a host of deadly contagions, from polio to AIDS, continue to threaten human health around the world. Spanning three centuries, The End of Plagues weaves together the discovery of vaccination, the birth and growth of immunology, and the fight to eradicate the world's most feared diseases. From Edward Jenner's discovery of vaccination in 1796, to the early nineteenth-century foundling voyages in which chains of orphans, vaccinated one by one, were sent to colonies around the globe, to the development of polio vaccines and the stockpiling of smallpox as a biological weapon in the Cold War, world-renown immunologist John Rhodes charts our fight against these plagues, and shows how vaccinations gave humanity the upper hand. Today, aid groups including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the World Health Organization have made the eradication of polio a priority, and Rhodes takes us behind the scenes to witness how soon we may be celebrating the eradication of polio.

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