Catalogue


Empire, religion and revolution in early Virginia, 1607-1786 /
by James B. Bell.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
description
xv, 268 p.
ISBN
113732791X (hardback), 9781137327918 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
isbn
113732791X (hardback)
9781137327918 (hardback)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: -- Acknowledgements -- List of tables -- Some Useful Dates -- PART I -- Prologue -- 1. England's Early Imperial Interests: Ireland and Virginia -- 2. The Virginia Company of London and America: Virginia, 1607-1624 -- 3. Virginia and Royal Jurisdiction: Laws, Governors, and Church: 1624-1660 -- PART II -- 4. Churches and Worship -- 5. A Social Profile of Virginia's Ministers, 1607-1700 -- 6. Salaries and Discipline of Seventeenth-Century Clergymen -- 7. Divisions of the English Church in Virginia's Pulpits: Anglicans, Puritans and Nonconformists -- 8. The Libraries of Two Century Seventeenth-Ministers: Anglican John Goodbourne and Nonconformist Thomas Teackle -- PART III -- 9. An Age of New Imperial Policies: Church and State, 1660-1713 -- 10. The Peace Disturbed: Salaries and Controversies, 1696-1777 -- 11. Virginia's Favoured Anglican Church: Faces an Unknown Future: 1776 -- 12. The College of William and Mary: Faces an Unknown Future, 1776 -- Epilogue: A New Age Breaks with the Past -- Appendix I - Clergymen who Arrived in Virginia Between 1607 and 1699 -- Appendix II - Clergymen who Arrived in Virginia by Decades Between 1607 and 1699 -- Appendix III - Colleges and Universities Attended by Seventeenth-century Virginia Clergymen -- Appendix IV - Virginia Parishes and their Ministers in the Seventeenth-century -- Bibliography -- Index.
abstract
"This book is a chronicle of England's contrasting imperial civil and ecclesiastical policies for its first two colonies, Ireland and Virginia. The settlement of Virginia contrasted sharply from England's experience in Ireland. It was not an undertaking of the state but a commercial enterprise delegated by James I to the merchant adventurers of the Virginia Company of London. The colony was launched without the familiar English civil, military, and ecclesiastical personnel and leadership applied in Ireland. It was the Company's obligation to recruit settlers for the colony, provide governance, administration, laws, and religious worship in accordance with the English Church. Ireland was not an imperial model for Virginia. The novelty of governing a sparsely settled colony thirty-seven-hundred miles distant from Whitehall in London proved financially difficult for the Virginia Company. After its charter was revoked in 1624 the province became a royal jurisdiction. Gradually over several decades the governor and legislature advocated and implemented statues for the conduct of civil, ecclesiastical, trade, and commercial affairs. Between 1680 and 1713 London officials applied new imperial policies for the governance of overseas affairs that became the formula for the administration of the province until the Declaration of Independence"--
catalogue key
9083623
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 240-255) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text is a new study that examines the contrasting extension of the Anglican Church to England's first two colonies, Ireland and Virginia in the 17th and 18th centuries. It discusses the national origins and educational experience of the ministers, the financial support of the state, and the experience and consequences of the institutions.
Long Description
This book is a chronicle of England's contrasting imperial civil and ecclesiastical policies for its first two colonies, Ireland and Virginia. The settlement of Virginia contrasted sharply from England's experience in Ireland. It was not an undertaking of the state but a commercial enterprise delegated by James I to the merchant adventurers of the Virginia Company of London. The colony was launched without the familiar English civil, military, and ecclesiastical personnel and leadership applied in Ireland. It was the Company's obligation to recruit settlers for the colony, provide governance, administration, laws, and religious worship in accordance with the English Church. Ireland was not an imperial model for Virginia. The novelty of governing a sparsely settled colony thirty-seven-hundred miles distant from Whitehall in London proved financially difficult for the Virginia Company. After its charter was revoked in 1624 the province became a royal jurisdiction. Gradually over several decades the governor and legislature advocated and implemented statues for the conduct of civil, ecclesiastical, trade, and commercial affairs. Between 1680 and 1713 London officials applied new imperial policies for the governance of overseas affairs that became the formula for the administration of the province until the Declaration of Independence.
Long Description
This book is a chronicle of England's contrasting imperial civil and ecclesiastical policies for its first two colonies, Ireland and Virginia. The settlement of Virginia contrasted sharply with England's experience in Ireland. It was not an undertaking of the state but a commercial enterprise delegated by James I to the merchant adventurers of the Virginia Company of London. The colony was launched without the familiar English civil, military, and ecclesiastical personnel and leadership applied in Ireland. It was the Company's obligation to recruit settlers for the colony, provide governance, administration, laws, and religious worship in accordance with the English Church. Ireland was not an imperial model for Virginia. The novelty of governing a sparsely settled colony thirty-seven-hundred miles distant from Whitehall in London proved financially difficult for the Virginia Company. After its charter was revoked in 1624 the province became a royal jurisdiction. Gradually over several decades the governor and legislature advocated and implemented statutes for the conduct of civil, ecclesiastical, trade, and commercial affairs. Between 1680 and 1713 London officials applied new imperial policies for the governance of overseas affairs that became the formula for the administration of the province until the Declaration of Independence.
Main Description
This book is a chronicle of England's contrasting imperial civil and ecclesiastical policies for its first two colonies, Ireland and Virginia. The settlement of Virginia contrasted sharply from England's experience in Ireland. It was not an undertaking of the state but a commercial enterprise delegated by James I to the merchant adventurers of the Virginia Company of London. The colony was launched without the familiar English civil, military, and ecclesiastical personnel and leadership applied in Ireland. It was the Company's obligation to recruit settlers for the colony, provide governance, administration, laws, and religious worship in accordance with the English Church. Ireland was not an imperial model for Virginia.The novelty of governing a sparsely settled colony thirty-seven-hundred miles distant from Whitehall in London proved financially difficult for the Virginia Company. After its charter was revoked in 1624 the province became a royal jurisdiction. Gradually over several decades the governor and legislature advocated and implemented statues for the conduct of civil, ecclesiastical, trade, and commercial affairs. Between 1680 and 1713 London officials applied new imperial policies for the governance of overseas affairs that became the formula for the administration of the province until the Declaration of Independence.
Main Description
This book is a chronicle of England's contrasting imperial civil and ecclesiastical policies for its first two colonies, Ireland and Virginia. The settlement of Virginia contrasted sharply with England's experience in Ireland. It was not an undertaking of the state but a commercial enterprise delegated by James I to the merchant adventurers of the Virginia Company of London. The colony was launched without the familiar English civil, military, and ecclesiastical personnel and leadership applied in Ireland. It was the Company's obligation to recruit settlers for the colony, provide governance, administration, laws, and religious worship in accordance with the English Church. Ireland was not an imperial model for Virginia.The novelty of governing a sparsely settled colony thirty-seven-hundred miles distant from Whitehall in London proved financially difficult for the Virginia Company. After its charter was revoked in 1624 the province became a royal jurisdiction. Gradually over several decades the governor and legislature advocated and implemented statutes for the conduct of civil, ecclesiastical, trade, and commercial affairs. Between 1680 and 1713 London officials applied new imperial policies for the governance of overseas affairs that became the formula for the administration of the province until the Declaration of Independence.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem