Catalogue


Egypt on the brink : from Nasser to the Muslim Brotherhood /
Tarek Osman.
edition
Rev. and updated ed.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, 2013, c2013
description
xi, 309 p., [8] p.s of plates : ill., map ; 20 cm
ISBN
0300198698 (pbk.), 9780300198690 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, 2013, c2013
isbn
0300198698 (pbk.)
9780300198690 (pbk.)
contents note
Egypt's world -- Nasser and Arab nationalism -- The Islamists -- The rise of liberal capitalism -- Egyptian Christians -- The Mubarak years -- Young Egyptians -- Conclusion.
general note
Original publication: 2010.
Previous edition: 2011.
catalogue key
9083594
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 293-300) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-10-01:
Osman's book is a popularized account of Egypt's political history since the rise of Gamal Abdel Nasser in 1952, told in a linear fashion. While it is clear and accessible, the book lacks a conceptual framework and oversimplifies issues. The narrative portrays the descent of modern Egypt into increasing authoritarianism, poverty, and social strife as resulting from an erosion of government by popular consent; a half-hearted implementation of "liberal capitalism" by the late President Sadat under the auspices of the infitah; austere structural adjustment measures undertaken by President Mubarak as required by the IMF; demographic growth; and a growing alienation of the population, especially unemployed youth. Osman attributes the failings of Mubarak's rule to his unfocused "pragmatism" and inability to "connect" with the people. However, chapter 2, chronicling the rise and legacy of Nasser, presents a balanced account of a leader frequently slighted in the literature. Although the author depicts the plight of Egyptian youth and its coping strategies, he sees it largely as either too marginalized to bring about political change, or engaged in activities too localized to be significant. The spring 2011 youth-driven Egyptian revolution clearly proved this assessment wrong. Summing Up: Recommended. General collections, public libraries. M. Lazreg Hunter College, CUNY
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Osman delivers textured historical context . . . and he focuses analysis more accurately than most current pundits."-Carlin Romano, The Chronicle of Higher Education
"Osman delivers textured historical context . . . and he focuses analysis more accurately than most current pundits."Carlin Romano, The Chronicle of Higher Education
"Published a short time before thousands of Egyptians began pouring into Cairo''s Tahrir Square, Egypt on the Brink is a timely account of Egypt near the end of the 30-year Mubarak era. It is presented thematically, rather than chronologically, and one of the most intriguing themes is the notion that whereas Egypt in the age of liberal nationalism (the 1920s and 1930s) and the Nasser years (1952-70) had a regional standing and a sense of national purpose, Hosni Mubarak''s regime lost both this standing and this purpose as it devolved into a dreary despotism. Yet Osman writes with neither nostalgia nor disdain. Separate chapters discuss the Islamists, the Christians, the rise of liberal capitalism, and Egypt''s youth. Even the conclusion, which speculates on who and what regime would replace Mubarak, now overtaken by events, offers useful thoughts on Egypt''s distinctive politics."L. Carl Brown, Foreign Affairs
"Published a short time before thousands of Egyptians began pouring into Cairo's Tahrir Square, Egypt on the Brink is a timely account of Egypt near the end of the 30-year Mubarak era. It is presented thematically, rather than chronologically, and one of the most intriguing themes is the notion that whereas Egypt in the age of liberal nationalism (the 1920s and 1930s) and the Nasser years (1952-70) had a regional standing and a sense of national purpose, Hosni Mubarak's regime lost both this standing and this purpose as it devolved into a dreary despotism. Yet Osman writes with neither nostalgia nor disdain. Separate chapters discuss the Islamists, the Christians, the rise of liberal capitalism, and Egypt's youth. Even the conclusion, which speculates on who and what regime would replace Mubarak, now overtaken by events, offers useful thoughts on Egypt's distinctive politics."-L. Carl Brown, Foreign Affairs
"Short, readable, clear, and passionately written. A good introduction to Egypt's story." Boston Globe
"Short, readable, clear, and passionately written. A good introduction to Egypt's story."- Boston Globe
"Short, readable, clear, and passionately written. A good introduction to Egypt's story."-- Boston Globe
"Tarek Osman, a Western-educated Egyptian banker and occasional columnist, brings the eye of an intelligent amateur to the story of this country's past half century. He writes with feeling, backed up by an impressively broad list of sources as well as sharp critical insight and astute judgement."-The Economist
"Tarek Osman, a Western-educated Egyptian banker and occasional columnist, brings the eye of an intelligent amateur to the story of this country's past half century. He writes with feeling, backed up by an impressively broad list of sources as well as sharp critical insight and astute judgement."The Economist
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Tarek Osman explores what has happened to the biggest Arab nation since President Nasser took control of the country in 1954. He examines Egypt's central role in the development of the two crucial movements of the period, Arab nationalism and radical Islam.
Main Description
In this immensely readable and thoroughly researched book, Tarek Osman explores what has happened to the biggest Arab nation since President Nasser took control of the country in 1954. This new edition takes events up to summer 2013, looking at how Egypt has become increasingly divided under its new Islamist government.

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