Catalogue


Gaddafi's harem /
Annick Cojean ; translated from the French by Marjolijn de Jager.
imprint
New York : Grove Press, [2013], c2013
description
x, 294 p. ; 22 cm
ISBN
0802121721 (hc), 9780802121721 (hc)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
uniform title
imprint
New York : Grove Press, [2013], c2013
isbn
0802121721 (hc)
9780802121721 (hc)
contents note
Part 1: SORAYA'S STORY. Childhood -- Prisoner -- Bab alAzizia -- Ramada -- Harem -- Africa -- Hicham -- Escape -- Paris -- Cogwheels -- Liberation -- Part 2: THE INVESTIGATION: In Soraya's footsteps -- "Libya," Khadija, Leila . . . and so many more -- The Amazons -- The predator -- Master of the universe -- Mansour Daw -- Accomplices and providers -- Mabrouka -- A military weapon.
abstract
Soraya was just fifteen, a schoolgirl in the coastal town of Sirte, when she was given the honor of presenting a bouquet of flowers to Colonel Gaddafi, "the Guide," on a visit he was making to her school the following week. This one meeting--a presentation of flowers, a pat on the head from Gaddafi--changed Soraya's life forever. Soon afterwards, she was summoned to Bab al-Azizia, Gaddafi's palatial compound near Tripoli, where she joined a number of young women who were violently abused, raped and degraded by Gaddafi. Heartwrenchingly tragic but ultimately redemptive, Soraya's story is the first one of many that are just now beginning to be heard. But sex and rape remain the highest taboo in Libya, and women like Soraya (whose identity is protected by a pseudonym here) risk being disowned or even killed by their dishonored family members. In "Gaddafi's Harem," an instant bestseller on publication in France, where it has already sold more than 100,000 copies in hardcover, "Le Monde" special correspondent Annick Cojean gives a voice to Soraya's story, and supplements her investigation into Gaddafi's abuses of power through interviews with people who knew Soraya, as well as with other women who were abused by Gaddafi.
catalogue key
9062586
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2013-08-01:
A best seller as soon as it was published in France earlier this year, French journalist Cojean's book proves to be a harrowing read, difficult to put down. The first half recounts in terrifying detail the narrative of Soraya, a Libyan teenage schoolgirl chosen by Colonel Gaddafi to be one of his "harem"-women, some of them extremely young, kept as slaves to satisfy his depraved and pathologic need for sex. The second half consists of Cojean's investigative journalism, which reveals stories of women held captive or controlled by Gaddafi and the vast network of accomplices and predators who enabled the dictator's systematic abuse of women even as he claimed to be their champion. Cojean details Gaddafi's perversion, the lengths to which his inner circle would go to satisfy his desire for women and power, and the systemic use of rape as a weapon of terror. She also elucidates the astounding challenges still faced by women who have been abused and enslaved under his regime, shedding light on an aspect of the dictatorship often hidden or dismissed, even within Libya. VERDICT Gripping, deeply disturbing, and compulsively readable. Readers interested in women's rights, global issues, or Gaddafi's regime will find this book fascinating. [See Prepub Alert, 3/25/13.]-Julie Edwards, Univ. of Montana Lib, -Missoula (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2013-06-10:
A renowned French journalist for Le Monde uncovers another level of monstrousness in the recently overthrown dictatorship of Libya's Muammar Gaddafi. Cojean's riveting two-part story opens with the blunt firsthand account of the kidnap and rape of a young girl. In 2004, just after turning 15, Soraya was thrilled to present a bouquet of flowers to Gaddafi when he visited her school. The next day, three women from his Committee of the Revolution took her to visit his nearby encampment. She wasn't allowed to leave. Soraya was bathed, made-up, and delivered to Gaddafi's bedroom. Over the next five years, Gaddafi repeatedly raped and abused Soraya, forcing her to smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol, snort cocaine, and watch pornography. In the second half of the book, Cojean investigates Soraya's story. Navigating traditional Libyan cultural silences on rape, Cojean locates anonymous sources who corroborate chilling descriptions of Gaddafi's use of rape as a political weapon, and the resultant pall of disgrace cast on the victims and their families. Even after Gaddafi's death and the collapse of his regime, it is the Libyan women who continue to suffer-reviled by their families, ignored by their government and the international community, living in silent shame. A moving and disturbing wake-up call to the personal costs of totalitarianism. Agent: Heidi Warneke, Editions Grasset & Fasquelle. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A renowned French journalist for Le Monde uncovers another level of monstrousness in the recently overthrown dictatorship of Libya's Muammar Gaddafi. . . .A moving and disturbing wake-up call to the personal costs of totalitarianism."-- Publishers Weekly "In one moment, Gaddafi had indeed marked Soraya as special. And soon she would disappear completely. What happened to Soraya is recounted in Annick Cojean's staggering new book."-- New York Post "A personal account from one of Muammar Gaddafi's former sex slaves. . . sheds even more light on the strange and terrifying lifestyle of Libya's former dictator."-- Daily Mail "A terrifying book-length investigation whose journalist author follows the trail of Soraya, bringing her story to life before embarking on a broader, no less chilling investigation into Gaddafi's "system of sexual slaves," the violated women that Gaddafi called his "girls". She shows all the distress, loneliness, and fear of these young women, victims not only of a dictator but also of a society that considers their dishonor to be a national disgrace better left unspoken."-- Livres Hebdo "Kidnapping, rape, humiliation. This was the fate of so many women who were held at the mercy of Colonel Gaddafi. In this shocking book, Annick Cojean gives these women a voice. . . [ Gaddafi's Harem ] will stay with you for a long time . . . Cojean describes a terrifying system where young women were forced to satisfy the perverse desires of the "Guide," under threat of terrible reprisals. . . . An exceptional piece of reporting."-- Elle (France) "If you think you have discovered all of the quirks in Gaddafi's character, you are mistaken. . . A study taken with great audacity by a senior reporter for Le Monde , and at some personal risk since these crimes are completely taboo in Libya, even today. Astonishing."-- Le Figaro "This is a subject that is still taboo, even in the new Libya, a country which has barely overthrown its former tyrant. . . . Gaddafi joyfully paraded around like a feminist of the East, avowing his struggle "to liberate the women of the Arab nation." But, completely at odds with the Bedouin suffragette Gaddafi pretended to be, Gaddafi's Harem shockingly reveals his sexual exploitation of an entire country."-- Le Point "You follow this remarkable investigation and relive the nightmare. Gaddafi's Harem bears witness to an entire system that used rape as a weapon of terror."-- Marie Claire (France) "Annick Cojean's book, written in a precise and ultra-sensitive language, assembles facts and testimonies that appall, while also giving a behind-the-scenes view of high-risk reporting. Outstanding."-- Paris Match "Lifts the veil on the terrible sexual abuses perpetrated by Gaddafi. A fantastic investigation. . . . Page after page, Cojean gives a name, a face and a voice to the victims of this devastating suffering."-- L'Express "In 2011, Annick Cojean, senior reporter at Le Monde and special correspondent for Tripoli, wrote a shock article titled "Gaddafi's sexual slave", which was published on November 16 and which told the story of Soraya, a twenty-two-year old Libyan woman who had been kidnapped and held captive since the age of 15. In 2012, Cojean returned to Libya to continue her investigation. Her book, Gaddafi's Harem , takes Soraya as its starting point to recount the fates of so many other women. She has gone to remarkable lengths -- rape is the highest taboo in Libya -- to collect these women's stories."-- Le Monde "This brutally honest account of a forty-two-year-long reign of terror and depravity, kidnappings and rape, plunges us headfirst into the dramatic story of Libyan womanhood and the law of silence imposed by Muammar Gaddafi."-- Stiletto "Special correspondent at French newspaper Le Monde , Annick Cojean is an all-terrain journalist: she landed the final interview Princess Diana gave in 1997, but also won the Prix Albert-Londres for her set of reports entitled "Rembering the Shoah." . . . Gaddafi's Harem is at once poignant, terrifying, and unsettling."-- 24 heures (Switzerland)
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, June 2013
Booklist, August 2013
Kirkus Reviews, August 2013
Library Journal, August 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Library
Having presented flowers to Colonel Gaddafi when he visited her school, 14-year-old Soraya was summoned to Gaddafis compound and joined other girls repeatedly raped by Gaddafi. Le Monde special correspondent Cojeans book has stirred attention worldwide.
Main Description
Soraya was just fifteen, a schoolgirl in the coastal town of Sirte, when she was given the honor of presenting a bouquet of flowers to Colonel Gaddafi, "the Guide," on a visit he was making to her school the following week. This one meeting--a presentation of flowers, a pat on the head from Gaddafi--changed Soraya's life forever. Soon afterwards, she was summoned to Bab al-Azizia, Gaddafi's palatial compound near Tripoli, where she joined a number of young women who were violently abused, raped and degraded by Gaddafi. Heartwrenchingly tragic but ultimately redemptive, Soraya's story is the first one of many that are just now beginning to be heard. But sex and rape remain the highest taboo in Libya, and women like Soraya (whose identity is protected by a pseudonym here) risk being disowned or even killed by their dishonored family members.In 'Gaddafi's Harem', an instant bestseller on publication in France, where it has already sold more than 100,000 copies in hardcover, 'Le Monde' special correspondent Annick Cojean gives a voice to Soraya's story, and supplements her investigation into Gaddafi's abuses of power through interviews with people who knew Soraya, as well as with other women who were abused by Gaddafi.
Table of Contents
Prologuep. 1
SorayaƆs Storyp. 13
Childhoodp. 15
Prisonerp. 30
Bab al-Aziziap. 44
Ramadanp. 55
Haremp. 69
Africap. 79
Hichamp. 88
Escapep. 102
Parisp. 108
Cogwheelsp. 123
Liberationp. 134
The Investigationp. 143
In Soraya's Footstepsp. 145
"Libya," Khadija, Leila … and So Many Morep. 162
The Amazonsp. 187
The Predatorp. 204
Master of the Universep. 219
Mansour Dawp. 229
Accomplices and Providersp. 240
Mabroukap. 257
A Military Weaponp. 267
Epiloguep. 277
Afterwordp. 289
Chronologyp. 292
Author's Acknowledgementsp. 293
About the Translatorp. 294
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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