Catalogue


Between remembering and forgetting : the spiritual dimensions of dementia /
edited by James Woodward.
imprint
London : New York, NY : Mowbray, 2010.
description
x, 139 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1441131140 (pbk.), 9781441131140 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
London : New York, NY : Mowbray, 2010.
isbn
1441131140 (pbk.)
9781441131140 (pbk.)
contents note
What is dementia? / Kate Read -- Remembering the cost : a theological reflection / Brian Allen -- A relative's perspective / Judith Allford -- Communication, faith and people with dementia / Margaret Anne Tibbs -- Learning love from people with dementia / John Killick -- Rediscovering the person through shared memories / Gaynor Hammond -- Connecting with the whole person through activities / Sally Knocker -- Worshipping with those with dementia / Patricia Higgins and Richard Allen -- End-of-life care for people with dementia / Katherine Froggatt -- The terminal care of people with dementia at home / Adrian Treloar -- Meeting the needs of a person with dementia in a care home / Margaret Goodall -- Achieving a good death in dementia / Beatrice Godwin.
catalogue key
9059009
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 135-139).
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
For ten years, James Woodward has been Master of the Foundation of Lady Katherine Leveson and Director of the Leveson Centre for the Study of Ageing, Spirituality and Social Policy. He is also Vicar of St Mary's Church, Temple Balsall.
Reviews
Review Quotes
I am grateful for this accessible, informative and educative book, and for its challenging, encouraging and humane tone. At its heart is the insistent call that we affirm the dignity of every "person" suffering dementia. It helps us to explore in depth the nature, the content and the context of good care. I hope it will be widely read.
Reviewed in the Baptist Times 17th September (UK) 'I would highly recommend this book to anyone who is seeking a greater understanding on caring either personally or pastorally with someone who has dementia.'
'[This book] should be mandatory reading for all entering ministry or providing pastoral care for the elderly.' Church Times, 23rd July, 2010
'This is an excellent introduction to an illness which now affects a quarter of those over 85... The chapter by Dr Adrian Treloar...is especially helpful.'
As we enjoy longer life expectancy, dementia becomes an increasingly significant and fearful challenge to the quality of our life. This collection of essays invites us to consider dementia from a variety of perspectives. It is a clear and compassionate plea for us to work together to improve our thinking and action.
Between Remembering and Forgetting almost made me weep. It is a clarion call to everyone concerned to recognise that people with dementia, from its mildest to its most severe forms, can still communicate, still have spiritual longings, and that we can reach them, with our imagination and their help. Everyone who looks after, or is concerned with policy around the care for, people with dementia needs to read these glorious and humbling essays and learn from them.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
A resource for reflection on the nature of dementia, particularly its spiritual dimension and the implications of that for Churches and other faith groups.
Main Description
We are increasingly aware of the economic and emotional cost of dementia, but its spiritual dimension is often overlooked. Between Remembering and Forgetting brings together contributions from distinguished and experienced practitioners in the front line of dementia research and care to reflect on this, and to explore the implications for Churches and other faith groups, as well as for individual carers. A practical focus offers not only a critique of areas for future research and development in the field of dementia, but also directs the reader to further resources. The Editor was for ten years Director of The Leveson Centre, which brings together for study, reflection and the exchange of ideas and information those who believe that older people should not be considered passive recipients of care, but as valued and cherished members of society who can inform and enrich the lives of others. In particular the Centre is developing an understanding of spirituality as lived by older people, and aims to support them to express their spiritual awareness.
Main Description
A resource for reflection on the nature of dementia, particularly its spiritual dimension and the implications of that for Churches and other faith groups.
Bowker Data Service Summary
James Woodward presents a resource for reflection on the nature of dementia, particularly its spiritual dimension and the implications of that for Churches and other faith groups.
Long Description
We are increasingly aware of the economic and emotional cost of dementia, but its spiritual dimension is often overlooked. Between Remembering and Forgetting brings together contributions from distinguished and experienced practitioners in the front line of dementia research and care to reflect on this, and to explore the implications for Churches and other faith groups, as well as for individual carers. A practical focus offers not only a critique of areas for future research and development in the field of dementia, but also directs the reader to further resources. The Editor was for ten years Director of The Leveson Centre, which brings together for study, reflection and the exchange of ideas and information those who believe that older people should not be considered passive recipients of care, but as valued and cherished members of society who can inform and enrich the lives of others. In particular the Centre is developing an understanding of spirituality as lived by older people, and aims to support them to express their spiritual awareness. >
Main Description
A much-needed resource for reflection on the nature of dementia, particularly its spiritual dimension, And The implications for Churches and other faith groups.
Table of Contents
Introduction: James Woodward, Director of the Leveson Centre for the Study of Ageing, Spirituality and Social Policy
What is dementia?
Overview and introductory material, including contributions from Kate Read (Director of Dementia Plus)
The pastoral and spiritual needs of people with dementia
Theological reflection and practical response, including contributions from Brian Allen, Alison Johnson, Patricia Higgins and Richard Allen; and a relative's perspective from Judith Alford
Quality of life for people with dementia
Communication and meaningful relationships; the survival of faith; the role of reminiscence in retaining personhood; the gifts we bring; a role for churches; with contributions from Margaret Anne Tibbs, John Killick, Gaynor Hammond and Sally Knicker
Worshipping with people with dementia
Principles and practical considerations; the application of this philosophy to other faiths; communication tips (contributions from Higgins & Allen; Chris Crosskey)
A good death for people with dementia
Palliative care; dying at home; 'The long goodbye'; A Good Death (with contributions from Katherine Froggatt, Adrian Treloar, Margaret Goodall and Beatrice Godwin)
Overview and conclusion: James Woodward (including an examination of the SPECAL approach pioneered by Penny Garner)
Appendix: Resources and further reading
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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