Catalogue


A history of African motherhood : the case of Uganda, 700-1900 /
Rhiannon Stephens.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
description
xv, 223 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1107030803 (hardback), 9781107030800 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
isbn
1107030803 (hardback)
9781107030800 (hardback)
contents note
Writing precolonial African history: words and other historical fragments -- Motherhood in north Nyanza, eighth through the twelfth century -- Consolidation and adaptation: the politics of motherhood in early Buganda and south Kyoga, thirteenth through the fifteenth century -- Mothering the kingdoms: Buganda, Busoga and east Kyoga, sixteenth through the eighteenth century -- Contesting the authority of mothers in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
catalogue key
9050690
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 195-210) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a book-length treatment of the history of motherhood in pre-colonial Africa. This book takes a new approach to longue durée African history through a focus on a highly gendered social institution, and changes our understanding of social and political organization in a region depicted as intensely patriarchal.
Description for Bookstore
This is the first book-length treatment of the history of motherhood in pre-colonial Africa. This book takes a new approach to longue durée African history through a focus on a highly gendered social institution, and changes our understanding of social and political organization in a region depicted as intensely patriarchal.
Description for Bookstore
This is the first book-length treatment of the history of motherhood in pre-colonial Africa. This book takes a new approach to longue dure African history through a focus on a highly gendered social institution, and changes our understanding of social and political organization in a region depicted as intensely patriarchal.
Description for Bookstore
This is the first book-length treatment of the history of motherhood in precolonial Africa. This book takes a new approach to longue durée African history through a focus on a highly gendered social institution, and changes our understanding of social and political organization in a region depicted as intensely patriarchal. It argues that even for times when we cannot identify individual actors, we can still trace historical agency in the way people reformulated and mobilized ideologies of motherhood to sustain their communities.
Main Description
This history of African motherhood over the longue durée demonstrates that it was, ideologically and practically, central to social, economic, cultural, and political life. The book explores how people in the North Nyanzan societies of Uganda used an ideology of motherhood to shape their communities. More than biology, motherhood created essential social and political connections that cut across patrilineal and cultural-linguistic divides. The importance of motherhood as an ideology and a social institution meant that in chiefdoms and kingdoms queen mothers were powerful officials who legitimated the power of kings. This was the case in Buganda, the many kingdoms of Busoga, and the polities of Bugwere. By taking a long-term perspective from c.700 to 1900 CE and using an interdisciplinary approach - drawing on historical linguistics, comparative ethnography, and oral traditions and literature, as well as archival sources - this book shows the durability, mutability, and complexity of ideologies of motherhood in this region.
Main Description
This history of African motherhood over the longue dure demonstrates that it was, ideologically and practically, central to social, economic, cultural and political life. The book explores how people in the North Nyanzan societies of Uganda used an ideology of motherhood to shape their communities. More than biology, motherhood created essential social and political connections that cut across patrilineal and cultural-linguistic divides. The importance of motherhood as an ideology and a social institution meant that in chiefdoms and kingdoms queen mothers were powerful officials who legitimated the power of kings. This was the case in Buganda, the many kingdoms of Busoga, and the polities of Bugwere. By taking a long-term perspective from c.700 to 1900 CE and using an interdisciplinary approach - drawing on historical linguistics, comparative ethnography, and oral traditions and literature, as well as archival sources - this book shows the durability, mutability and complexity of ideologies of motherhood in this region.

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