Catalogue


A widow's tale [electronic resource] : the 1884-1896 diary of Helen Mar Kimball Whitney /
transcribed and edited by Charles M. Hatch and Todd M. Compton ; introduction, notes, and register by Todd M. Compton.
imprint
Logan, Utah : Utah State University Press, 2003.
description
[xiv], 887 p. : ill.
ISBN
0874215579 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Logan, Utah : Utah State University Press, 2003.
isbn
0874215579 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
9048590
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 811-830) and index.
A Look Inside
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This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
Mormon culture has produced during its history an unusual number of historically valuable personal writings. Few such diaries, journals, and memoirs published have provided as rich and well rounded a window into their authors' lives and worlds as the diary of Helen Mar Kimball Whitney. Because it provides a rare account of the widely experienced situations and problems faced by widows, her record has relevance far beyond Mormon history though. As a teenager Helen Kimball had been a polygamous wife of Mormon founder Joseph Smith. She subsequently married Horace Whitney. Her children included the noted Mormon author, religious authority, and politician Orson F. Whitney. She herself was a leading woman in her church and society and a writer known especially for her defense of plural marriage. Upon Horace's death, she began keeping a diary. In it, she recorded her economic, physical, and psychological struggles to meet the challenges of widowhood. Her writing was introspective and revelatory. She also commented on the changing society around her, as Salt Lake City in the last decades of the nineteenth century underwent rapid transformation, modernizing and opening up from its pioneer beginnings. She remained a well-connected member of an elite group of leading Latter-day Saint women, and prominent Utah and Mormon historical figures appear frequently in her daily entries. Above all, though, her diary is an unusual record of difficulties faced in many times and places by women, of all classes, whose husbands died and left them without sufficient means to carry on the types of lives to which they had been accustomed.
Main Description
Volume 6, Life Writings of Frontier Women series, ed. Maureen Ursenbach Beecher Mormon culture has produced during its history an unusual number of historically valuable personal writings. Few such diaries, journals, and memoirs published have provided as rich and well rounded a window into their authors' lives and worlds as the diary of Helen Mar Kimball Whitney. Because it provides a rare account of the widely experienced situations and problems faced by widows, her record has relevance far beyond Mormon history though. As a teenager Helen Kimball had been a polygamous wife of Mormon founder Joseph Smith. She subsequently married Horace Whitney. Her children included the noted Mormon author, religious authority, and politician Orson F. Whitney. She herself was a leading woman in her church and society and a writer known especially for her defense of plural marriage. Upon Horace's death, she began keeping a diary. In it, she recorded her economic, physical, and psychological struggles to meet the challenges of widowhood. Her writing was introspective and revelatory. She also commented on the changing society around her, as Salt Lake City in the last decades of the nineteenth century underwent rapid transformation, modernizing and opening up from its pioneer beginnings. She remained a well-connected member of an elite group of leading Latter-day Saint women, and prominent Utah and Mormon historical figures appear frequently in her daily entries. Above all, though, her diary is an unusual record of difficulties faced in many times and places by women, of all classes, whose husbands died and left them without sufficient means to carry on the types of lives to which they had been accustomed.
Unpaid Annotation
Mormon culture has produced during its history an unusual number of historically valuable personal writings. Few such diaries, journals, and memoirs published have provided as rich and well rounded a window into their authors' lives and worlds as the diary of Helen Mar Kimball Whitney. Because it provides a rare account of the widely experienced situations and problems faced by widows, her record has relevance far beyond Mormon history though. As a teenager Helen Kimball had been a polygamous wife of Mormon founder Joseph Smith. She subsequently married Horace Whitney. Her children included the noted Mormon author, religious authority, and politician Orson F. Whitney. She herself was a leading woman in her church and society and a writer known especially for her defense of plural marriage. Upon Horace's death, she began keeping a diary. In it, she recorded her economic, physical, and psychological struggles to meet the challenges of widowhood. Her writing was introspective and revelatory. She also commented,on the changing society around her, as Salt Lake City in the last decades of the nineteenth century underwent rapid transformation, modernizing and opening up from its pioneer beginnings. She remained a well-connected member of an elite group of leading Latter-day Saint women, and prominent Utah and Mormon historical figures appear frequently in her daily entries. Above all, though, her diary is an unusual record of difficulties faced in many times and places by women, of all classes, whose husbands died and left them without sufficient means to carry on the types of lives to which they had been accustomed.
Table of Contents
Foreword
Preface
Introductionp. 1
Helen Mar Whitney's Familyp. 37
1884: Horace Has Spent a Dreadful Nightp. 43
1885: Oh! How I Feel My Loss - My Widowhoodp. 61
1886: It Seemed Like a Dream That I Must Awake Fromp. 129
1887: I Woke Sobbing Three Timesp. 213
1888: This Valley Is Covered with Thick Fog to Day - Very Drearyp. 277
1889: A Beautiful White Coffin Held the Little Lamb & All Pronounced Him Beautifulp. 339
1890: A "Liberal" Gang of the Scum & Boys Passed Up Our Streetp. 388
1891: E. M. Wells Came to See Us, & the House, at Evening - Thought It Lovelyp. 428
1892: We've Got to Do Something to Keep Ourselves Out of Debtp. 484
1893: Mary ... Gone To Chicago ... We Can't Afford to Go to the Saltairp. 527
1894: They Were the Best & Firmest in the Cause of Truthp. 581
1895: She ... Proposed to Have All Lay Hands on My Head & Rebuke My Afflictionsp. 639
1896: I Couldnt Talk Right - After One Word All Was Mudledp. 688
Notesp. 719
Bibliographyp. 811
Register of Names in the Diaryp. 831
Subject Indexp. 875
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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