Catalogue


Indian self-rule [electronic resource] : first-hand accounts of Indian-white relations from Roosevelt to Reagan /
edited by Kenneth R. Philp ; with forewords by Floyd A. O'Neil, Alvin M. Josephy, Jr., and E. Richard Hart.
imprint
Logan, Utah : Utah State University Press, 1995.
description
vii, 343 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0874211808
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Logan, Utah : Utah State University Press, 1995.
isbn
0874211808
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Contains papers which evolved from the Conference on Indian Self-Rule, sponsored by the Institute of the American West and held in Sun Valley, Idaho from Aug. 17-20, 1983.
Originally published: Salt Lake City, Utah : Howe Bros., 1986. With new foreword.
catalogue key
9047480
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 326-335) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1985-12:
This book is a compilation of papers, comments, and discussions presented at the Conference on Indian Self-Rule held in Sun Valley, Idaho, in August 1983. The chapters are divided into four categories: (1) the Indian New Deal, 1928-45, (2) Termination, 1945-60, (3) Self-Determination, 1960-76, and (4) Indian Self-Rule. Each chapter includes accounts from various panels which included Indian spokespersons, federal policymakers, anthropologists, political scientists, and other scholars. Of particular interest are the Indian participants' first-hand recollections of the effects of the changing federal policies on Indian life. Recommended for academic and large public libraries. Smaller collections can skip. Ruth H. Dukelow, Lib. of Michigan, Lansing (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 1987-02:
An abridged report of a conference on the Indian Reorganization Act sponsored by the Institute of the American West (1983). The conference held sessions on the Indian New Deal, termination, the period of self-determination since the early 1960's, and the present and future of Indian policy. Discussions included: the nature of Indian governments from the 1930s to date; the Indian Claims Commission; relocation; the war on poverty in Indian country; the 1975 Self-Determination Act. The conference was notable for extensive Indian participation; 31 of the speakers quoted in this book were Indians, 18 were non-Indians. The caliber of the participants was high; four were ex-Commissioners of Indian Affairs and many of the others are among the most important participants and scholars in the field of Indian affairs. Many short statements, but several excellent long ones, notably by Philip S. Deloria and W. Roger Buffalohead. Although there is no overall theme, the book presents a remarkably thorough overview of Indian affairs today. A few photographs; bibliography; index. Students and general readers.- E.R. Rusco, University of Nevada, Reno
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, December 1985
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Indian Self-Rule is a record of the rarest of occasions, for never before have so many individuals who played an important role in Indian-white relations had the chance to meet and exchange views. The contributors include Indian leaders and activists from a wide cross-section of America's varied native communities; government officials who formulated and administered federal policy, often receiving the blame, rightly or wrongly, when things went wrong; lawyers and other professionals who represent and serve native Americans in courtrooms, corporate offices, and elsewhere; and scholars - historians, anthropologists, political scientists, and others - who study Indians and Indian issues, usually from relatively remote university corridors. Their purpose was to review the fifty years of Indian history since the Indian Reorganization Act was passed during Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal administration. That legislation sought to recast federal Indian policy, redirecting it away from dictatorial assimilation policies toward more self-government for Indians and new respect for their cultural heritage. Other important changes and events have occurred in the subsequent fifty years, including a tribal termination policy, a resurgence of Indian activism, millions of dollars in Indian claims settlements, and the assertion of tribal control over vast energy-rich resources. The common theme that has run through them all has been Indians' struggle for greater control over their own lives and affairs. The result has been a fitful, uneven progression toward self-determination and self-rule, conditions other Americans take for granted.
Long Description
A collection of first-hand accounts from individuals who had leading roles in Indian-White relations. A key reference for the modern Indian experience.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. 3
Forewordp. 6
Introductionp. 15
The Indian New Dealp. 27
The Indian New Deal: An Overviewp. 30
Federal Indian Policy, 1933-1945p. 47
Felix Cohen and the Adoption of the IRAp. 70
Implementing the IRAp. 79
The IRA and Indian Culture, Religion, and Artsp. 92
The IRA Record and John Collierp. 101
Terminationp. 111
Termination As Federal Policy: An Overviewp. 114
Federal Indian Policy, 1945-1960p. 129
Undoing the IRAp. 142
The Indian Claims Commissionp. 150
Relocationp. 161
The Legacy of the Termination Erap. 174
Toward Self-Determinationp. 187
The Era of Indian Self-Determination: An Overviewp. 191
Federal Indian Policy, 1960-1976p. 208
The War on Povertyp. 219
Activism and Red Powerp. 228
Traditionalism and the Reassertion of Indiannessp. 243
Contracting Under the Self-Determination Actp. 251
Indian Self-Rule in the Past and the Futurep. 261
Self-Rule in the Past and the Future: An Overviewp. 265
Federal Indian Policy Yesterday and Tomorrowp. 278
Tribal Sovereignty: Roots, Expectations, and Limitsp. 289
Indian Control of Indian Resourcesp. 296
The Trust Obligationp. 302
What Indians Should Want: Advice to the Presidentp. 311
List of Contributorsp. 323
Bibliographyp. 326
Indexp. 337
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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