Catalogue


Six women of Salem : the untold story of the accused and their accusers in the Salem Witch Trials /
Marilynne K. Roach.
imprint
Boston, MA : Da Capo Press, c2013.
description
x, 445 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0306821206 (pbk.), 9780306821202 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Boston, MA : Da Capo Press, c2013.
isbn
0306821206 (pbk.)
9780306821202 (pbk.)
abstract
In a combination of narrative and groundbreaking historical research, Salem Witch Trial scholar Marilynne K. Roach brings the terrifying times to life while skillfully illuminating the lives of the accused, the accusers, and the afflicted.
catalogue key
9043826
 
Includes bibliographical references: (p. 401-434) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
'Six Women of Salem' is the first work to use the lives of a select number of representative women as a microcosm to illuminate the larger crisis of the Salem witch trials. By the end of the trials, beyond the twenty who were executed and the five who perished in prison, 207 individuals had been accused, 74 had been "afflicted," 32 had officially accused their fellow neighbors, and 255 ordinary people had been inexorably drawn into that ruinous and murderous vortex, and this doesn't include the religious, judicial, and governmental leaders. All this adds up to what the Rev. Cotton Mather called "a desolation of names."The individuals involved are too often reduced to stock characters and stereotypes when accuracy is sacrificed to indignation. And although the flood of names and detail in the history of an extraordinary event like the Salem witch trials can swamp the individual lives involved, individuals still deserve to be remembered and, in remembering specific lives, modern readers can benefit from such historical intimacy. By examining the lives of six specific women, Marilynne Roach shows readers what it was like to be present throughout this horrific time and how it was impossible to live through it unchanged.
Main Description
Six Women of Salem is the first work to use the lives of a select number of representative women as a microcosm to illuminate the larger crisis of the Salem witch trials. By the end of the trials, beyond the twenty who were executed and the five who perished in prison, 207 individuals had been accused, 74 had been "afflicted," 32 had officially accused their fellow neighbors, and 255 ordinary people had been inexorably drawn into that ruinous and murderous vortex, and this doesn't include the religious, judicial, and governmental leaders. All this adds up to what the Rev. Cotton Mather called "a desolation of names." The individuals involved are too often reduced to stock characters and stereotypes when accuracy is sacrificed to indignation. And although the flood of names and detail in the history of an extraordinary event like the Salem witch trials can swamp the individual lives involved, individuals still deserve to be remembered and, in remembering specific lives, modern readers can benefit from such historical intimacy. By examining the lives of six specific women, Marilynne Roach shows readers what it was like to be present throughout this horrific time and how it was impossible to live through it unchanged.
Main Description
Six Women of Salem is the first work to use the lives of a select number of representative women as a microcosm to illuminate the larger crisis of the Salem witch trials. By the end of the trials, beyond the twenty who were executed and the five who perished in prison, 207 individuals had been accused, 74 had been afflicted," 32 had officially accused their fellow neighbors, and 255 ordinary people had been inexorably drawn into that ruinous and murderous vortex, and this doesn't include the religious, judicial, and governmental leaders. All this adds up to what the Rev. Cotton Mather called a desolation of names." The individuals involved are too often reduced to stock characters and stereotypes when accuracy is sacrificed to indignation. And although the flood of names and detail in the history of an extraordinary event like the Salem witch trials can swamp the individual lives involved, individuals still deserve to be remembered and, in remembering specific lives, modern readers can benefit from such historical intimacy. By examining the lives of six specific women, Marilynne Roach shows readers what it was like to be present throughout this horrific time and how it was impossible to live through it unchanged.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introductions
Rebecca Nursep. 3
Bridget Bishopp. 15
Mary Englishp. 27
Ann Putnam Sr.p. 41
Titubap. 62
Mary Warrenp. 75
January 1692p. 87
February 1692p. 98
March 1 to Mid-March 1692p. 108
March 18 to March 31, 1692p. 126
April 1 to 19, 1692p. 149
April 19 to 30, 1692p. 159
May 1 to 12, 1692p. 177
May 12 to 30 1692p. 193
June 1 to 9, 1692p. 221
June 10 to 30, 1692p. 247
July 1 to 18, 1692p. 264
July 10 to 30, 1692p. 277
August 1 to 11, 1692p. 291
August 12 to 31, 1692p. 302
September 1692p. 315
October 1692p. 332
November to December 1692p. 344
January to May 1693p. 351
Afterword
Rebecca Nursep. 369
Bridget Bishopp. 378
Mary Englishp. 381
Ann Putnam Sr.p. 386
Titubap. 392
Mary Warrenp. 394
Coda and Acknowledgementsp. 399
Notesp. 401
Bibliographyp. 425
Indexp. 435
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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