Catalogue


Best practices in state and regional innovation initiatives [electronic resource] : competing in the 21st century /
Charles W. Wessner, Editor; Committee on Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives ; Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, Policy and Global Affairs ; National Research Council of the National Academies.
imprint
Washington, D. C. : The National Academies Press, 2013.
description
xvi, 240 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
ISBN
0309287340, 9780309287340
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Washington, D. C. : The National Academies Press, 2013.
isbn
0309287340
9780309287340
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Preface -- Executive Summary -- Innovation and Place-Based Economic Development -- Catalytic Role of Public Purpose Organizations -- Review of Selected State and Regional Practices -- Bibliography -- Annex A: Stanford and Silicon Valley -- Annex B: North Carolina's Research Triangle Park.
abstract
""Most of the policy discussion about stimulating innovation has focused on the federal level. This study focuses on the significant activity at the state level, with the goal of improving the public's understanding of key policy strategies and exemplary practices. Based on a series of workshops and conferences that brought together policymakers along with leaders of industry and academia in a select number of states, the study highlights a rich variety of policy initiatives underway at the state and regional level to foster knowledge based growth and employment. Perhaps what distinguishes this effort at the state level is most of all the high degree of pragmatism. Operating out of necessity, innovation policies at the state level often involve taking advantage of existing resources and recombining them in new ways, forging innovative partnerships among universities, industry and government organizations, growing the skill base, and investing in the infrastructure to develop new technologies and new industries. Many of these initiatives are being guided by leaders from the private sector and universities. The objective of Best Practices in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives: Competing in the 21st Century is not to do an empirical review of the inputs and outputs of various state programs. Nor is it to evaluate which programs are superior. Indeed, some of the notable successes, such as the Albany nanotechnology cluster, represent a leap of leadership, investment, and sustained commitment that has had remarkable results in an industry that is actively pursued by many countries. The study's goal is to illustrate the approaches taken by a variety of highly diverse states as they confront the increasing challenges of global competition for the industries and jobs of today and tomorrow."--Publisher's description
catalogue key
9035425
 
Bibliography: pages 187-216.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Long Description
Most of the policy discussion about stimulating innovation has focused on the federal level. This study focuses on the significant activity at the state level, with the goal of improving the public's understanding of key policy strategies and exemplary practices. Based on a series of workshops and conferences that brought together policymakers along with leaders of industry and academia in a select number of states, the study highlights a rich variety of policy initiatives underway at the state and regional level to foster knowledge based growth and employment. Perhaps what distinguishes this effort at the state level is most of all the high degree of pragmatism. Operating out of necessity, innovation policies at the state level often involve taking advantage of existing resources and recombining them in new ways, forging innovative partnerships among universities, industry and government organizations, growing the skill base, and investing in the infrastructure to develop new technologies and new industries. Many of these initiatives are being guided by leaders from the private sector and universities. The objective of Best Practices in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives: Competing in the 21st Century is not to do an empirical review of the inputs and outputs of various state programs. Nor is it to evaluate which programs are superior. Indeed, some of the notable successes, such as the Albany nanotechnology cluster, represent a leap of leadership, investment, and sustained commitment that has had remarkable results in an industry that is actively pursued by many countries. The study's goal is to illustrate the approaches taken by a variety of highly diverse states as they confront the increasing challenges of global competition for the industries and jobs of today and tomorrow.
Main Description
Best Practices in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives: Competing in the 21st Century, This report summarizes the results of a study conducted by the National Academies Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy of a variety of initiatives being taken by the federal government and U.S. states and regions to enhance their innovative potential and competitiveness. In addition to meetings in Washington, DC, the study conducted a series of public workshops and symposia in selected states and examined a number of technologies that might benefit from public-private partnerships. It examined the goals, structure, policy tools, modes of operation, public-private synergies, funding methods and levels, and education in a number of quite diverse regions and states, identifying a number of emerging features and best practices in state and regional innovation policies and programs. This review included both efforts to strengthen existing industries as well as specific new technology focus areas, such as nanotechnology or flexible electronics, in order to improve our understanding of program goals, challenges, and accomplishments. Drawing from discussions at these symposia, fact-finding meetings, and commissioned analyses of existing state and regional programs and technology focus areas, the committee has produced this final report focused on lessons, issues, and opportunities for policies to support government-industry-university cooperation. Related Work from the Step Board, Rising to the Challenge: U.S. Innovation Policy for the Global Economy, The culmination of the National Academies international study of Comparative National Innovation Policies: Best Practice for the 21st Century, this report provides a striking account of the challenges and opportunities faced by the United States in the face of global competition for the next generation of innovation. The report argues that today's new paradigm challenges the traditional assumptions that have guided U.S. policymaking for decades regarding America's ability to fully capitalize on its investments in science and innovation. The report gives an exceptionally comprehensive overview of the programs and policies in place around the world to build innovation-led economies and describes the deteriorating U.S. position in this international competitive landscape. A key argument is that the United States needs to renew its investments in the "pillars of U.S. innovation" if we are to capture economic value from our investments in research. Similarly, the United States needs to devote far more attention to understanding what the rest of the world is doing to nurture their economies. At the same time, the United States needs to make greater efforts to capture the outputs of U.S. investments in innovation, that is, to provide an environment that encourages the retention and growth of high-tech businesses and the high-quality jobs they bring. America's future economic growth and national security depend on renewed investments and sustained policy attention. Building the Illinois Innovation Economy: Summary of a Symposium, As part of the series on Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives, the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy convened state officials and staff, business leaders, and leading national figures in early-stage finance, technology, engineering, education, and state and federal policies to review challenges, plans, and opportunities for innovation-led growth in Illinois. These symposium participants assessed Illinois' academic, industrial, and human resources, identified key policy issues, and engaged in a discussion of how the state might leverage regional development organizations, state initiatives, and national programs focused on manufacturing and innovation to support its economic development goals. This report includes a summary of the symposium presentations and an overview section reviewing the issues discussed and placing them in a larger context. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Executive Summaryp. 1
Innovation and Place-Based Economic Developmentp. 5
Innovation in the Statesp. 7
Parameters of this Studyp. 9
State-led Development of Innovation Clustersp. 11
Identifying Best Practicesp. 15
Overview of the Reportp. 24
State and Regional Development and Clusteringp. 27
Natural Development Advantages Enjoyed by States and Regionsp. 28
The Innovation Cluster Phenomenonp. 31
"History Matters"-Part Dependency and Path Creationp. 37
The Importance of Entrepreneurshipp. 43
Lessons Learnedp. 45
The Catalytic Role of Public Purpose Organizationsp. 47
Universities as Innovation Driversp. 49
Universities and Industrializationp. 54
The Emergence of Cooperative Research Centersp. 57
Challenges Facing Public Research Universitiesp. 57
Harnessing the University of Hawaii as an Engine of Growthp. 59
The Growing Role of Community Collegesp. 65
Lessons Learnedp. 68
State Strategies for Innovationp. 69
From Industrial Recruitment to Science-Based Developmentp. 70
The Michigan Battery Initiativep. 75
Lessons Learnedp. 83
The Federal Dimensionp. 85
Federal Funding of Scientific Research and Economic Developmentp. 85
The Federal Role in Regional Development and Manufacturingp. 98
The Impact of Federal Patents and Antitrust Policyp. 102
International Trade Policyp. 107
Government Procurementp. 107
Lessons Learnedp. 108
Review of Selected State and Regional Practicesp. 109
Rebuilding Ohio's Innovation Economyp. 111
Revival Following a Generation of Economic Declinep. 111
State Government Initiativesp. 114
New Initiatives in Northeast Ohiop. 116
Growing the Cleveland Biomedical Clusterp. 123
Growing a Cluster in Flexible Electronicsp. 131
Youngstown-Sofware and Additive Manufacturingp. 133
The Toledo Photovoltaics Clusterp. 135
Ohio's Challenge Aheadp. 140
Lessons Learnedp. 141
The New York Nanotechnology Initiativep. 143
Upstate New York: The Economic Challengep. 144
The Semiconductor Advantage-and Challengep. 145
New York's Opportunityp. 147
The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE)p. 153
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institutep. 155
GlobalFoundriesp. 156
The Global 450 Consortiump. 159
Start-upsp. 161
Nano Beyond Microelectronicsp. 162
Semiconductors: The On-going Challenge from Abroadp. 163
Lessons Learnedp. 164
New Initiatives in Illinois and Arkansasp. 165
Growing a Biotechnology Cluster in Illinoisp. 165
Developing Arkansas' Workforce and Wind Powerp. 172
Lessons Learnedp. 183
Bibliographyp. 185
Annex A: Stanford and Silicon Valleyp. 217
Annex B: North Carolina's Research Triangle Parkp. 229
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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