Catalogue

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Creating citizenship in the nineteenth-century South /
edited by William A. Link ... [et al.].
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2013.
description
viii, 302 p.
ISBN
0813044138 (alk. paper), 9780813044132 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2013.
isbn
0813044138 (alk. paper)
9780813044132 (alk. paper)
contents note
Part 1: Citizenship in an enslaved society -- 1. "Ter show yo de value of slaves": The pricing of human property / Daina Ramey Berry -- 2. Rewriting the free negro past: Joseph Lumpkin, proslavery ideology, and citizenship in Antebellum Georgia / Watson Jennison -- 3. Free people of color, expulsion, and enslavement in the Antebellum South / Emily West -- 4. Citizenship, democracy, and the structure of politics in the old South: John Calhoun's conundrum / David Brown -- Part 2: Reconstructing citizenship -- 5. Personal reconstructions: Confederates as citizens in the post-Civil War South / James J. Broomall -- 6. Citizenship and racial order in post-Civil War Atlanta / William A. Link -- 7. The antithesis of Union men and Confederate rebels: loyal citizenship in the post-Civil War South / Susanna Michele Lee -- Part 3: Reimagining citizenship -- 8. Dark Satanic fields: Uncle Tom's cabin, industrialization, and the U.S. imperial imaginary / Jennifer Rae Greeson -- 9. Fables of the reconstruction: the citizen as character / Scott Romine -- 10. White supremacy and the question of black citizenship in the post-emancipation South / Daryl Michael Scott -- 11. Tolentino, Cable, and Tourgee confront the new South and the new imperialism / Peter Schmidt -- Epilogue: Place as everywhere: on globalizing the American South / Michael O'brien.
abstract
An edited collection resulting from four international conferences held between 2008 and 2010 on the theme of citizenship in the nineteenth-century American South.
catalogue key
9029735
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
William A. Link, Richard J. Milbauer Professor of History at the University of Florida, is the author of Links: My Family in American History. David Brown, senior lecturer in American Studies at the University of Manchester, is the coauthor of Race in the American South: From Slavery to Civil Rights. Brian Ward, professor in American Studies at Northumbria University, is the author of Radio and the Struggle for Civil Rights in the South. Martyn Bone, associate professor of American literature at the University of Copenhagen, is the author of The Postsouthern Sense of Place in Contemporary Fiction.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
"President Obama's citizenship continues to be questioned by the 'birthers,' the Cherokee Nation has revoked tribal rights from descendants of Cherokee slaves, and Parliament in the U.K. is debating 'citizenship education.' It is in both this broader context and in the narrower academic one that Creating Citizenship in the Nineteenth-Century South stands as a smart, exciting, and most welcome contribution to southern history and southern studies."-Michele K. Gillespie, author of Free Labor in an Unfree World "Combining historical and cultural studies perspectives, eleven well-crafted essays and a provocative epilogue engage the economic, political, and cultural dynamics of race and belonging from the era of enslavement through emancipation, reconstruction, and the New South."-Nancy A. Hewitt, author of Southern Discomfort More than merely a legal status, citizenship is also a form of belonging, giving shape to a person's rights, duties, and identity, exerting a powerful historical influence in the making of the modern world. The pioneering essays in this volume are the first to address the evolution and significance of citizenship in the South from the antebellum era, through the Civil War, and down into the late nineteenth century. They explore the politics and meanings of citizenry and citizens' rights in the nineteenth-century American South: from the full citizenship of some white males to the partial citizenship of women with no voting rights, from the precarious position of free blacks and enslaved African American anti-citizens, to postwar Confederate rebels who were not "loyal citizens" according to the federal government but forcibly asserted their citizenship as white supremacy was restored in the Jim Crow South. William A. Link , Richard J. Milbauer Professor of History at the University of Florida, is the author of Links: My Family in American History . David Brown , senior lecturer in American studies at the University of Manchester, is the author of Race in the American South: From Slavery to Civil Rights . Brian Ward , professor of American Studies at Northumbria University, is the author of Radio and the Struggle for Civil Rights in the South . Martyn Bone , associate professor of English at the University of Copenhagen, is the author of The Postsouthern Sense of Place in Contemporary Fiction .
Description for Bookstore
"This is a remarkable collection of essays. Citizenship clearly forms the backbone for these investigations but the range of the contributors' backgrounds (in terms of disciplinary training) and the approaches they take to the question makes this collection both broad and deep. As it turns out, there is no other way to tackle a concept as central but also as slippery as citizenship. A shorter or more focused collection would miss the nuances and insights that this one offers."-Aaron Sheehan-Dean, author of Why Confederates Fought: Family and Nation in Civil War Virginia "President Obama's citizenship continues to be questioned by the 'birthers,' the Cherokee Nation has revoked tribal rights from descendants of Cherokee slaves, and Parliament in the U.K. is debating 'citizenship education.' It is in both this broader context and in the narrower academic one that Creating Citizenship in the Nineteenth-Century South stands as a smart, exciting, and most welcome contribution to southern history and southern studies."-Michele Gillespie, author of Katharine and R.J. Reynolds: Partners of Fortune and the Making of the New South "Combining historical and cultural studies perspectives, eleven well-crafted essays and a provocative epilogue engage the economic, political, and cultural dynamics of race and belonging from the era of enslavement through emancipation, reconstruction, and the New South."-Nancy A. Hewitt, author of Southern Discomfort More than merely legal status, citizenship is also a form of belonging, shaping individual and group rights, duties, and identities. The pioneering essays in this volume are the first to address the evolution and significance of citizenship in the American South during the long nineteenth century. They explore the politics and contested meanings of citizenry from a variety of disciplinary perspectives in a tumultuous period when slavery, Civil War, Reconstruction, and segregation redefined relationships between different groups of southern men and women, both black and white. William A. Link , Richard J. Milbauer Professor of History at the University of Florida, is the author of Links: My Family in American History . David Brown , senior lecturer in American studies at the University of Manchester, is the coauthor of Race in the American South: From Slavery to Civil Rights . Brian Ward , professor of American Studies at Northumbria University, is the author of Radio and the Struggle for Civil Rights in the South . Martyn Bone , associate professor of American literature at the University of Copenhagen, is the author of The Postsouthern Sense of Place in Contemporary Fiction .
Main Description
More than merely legal status, citizenship is also a form of belonging, shaping individual and group rights, duties, and identities. The pioneering essays in this volume are the first to address the evolution and significance of citizenship in the American South during the long nineteenth century. From a variety of disciplinary perspectives, they explore the politics and contested meanings of citizenry in a tumultuous period when slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and segregation redefined relationships between different groups of southern men and women, both black and white. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Preface: Understanding the Southp. vii
Introductionp. 1
Citizenship in an Enslaved Society
"Ter Show Yo' de Value of Slaves": The Pricing of Human Propertyp. 21
Rewriting the Free Negro Past: Joseph Lumpkin, Proslavery Ideology, and Citizenship in Antebellum Georgiap. 41
Free People of Color, Expulsion, and Enslavement in the Antebellum Southp. 64
Citizenship, Democracy, and the Structure of Politics in the Old South: John Calhoun's Conundrump. 84
Reconstructing Citizenship
Personal Reconstructions: Confederates as Citizens in the Post-Civil War Southp. 111
Citizenship and Racial Order in Post-Civil War Atlantap. 134
The Antithesis of Union Men and Confederate-Rebels: Loyal Citizenship in the Post-Civil War Southp. 150
Reimagining Citizenship
Dark Satanic Fields: Uncle Tom's Cabin, Industrialization, and the US. Imperial Imaginaryp. 173
Fables of the Reconstruction: The Citizen as Characterp. 201
White Supremacy and the Question of Black Citizenship in the Post-Emancipation Southp. 223
Tolentino, Cable, and Tourgée Confront the New South and the New Imperialismp. 247
Epilogue: Place as Everywhere: On Globalizing the American Southp. 271
List of Contributorsp. 291
Indexp. 295
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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