Catalogue


Dissonance in the republic of letters : the Querelle des gluckistes et des piccinnistes /
Mark Darlow.
imprint
London : Modern Humanities Research Association and Maney Pub., 2013.
description
229 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
1907975543 (hbk.), 9781907975547 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
London : Modern Humanities Research Association and Maney Pub., 2013.
isbn
1907975543 (hbk.)
9781907975547 (hbk.)
contents note
Opera reform on the eve of Gluck's arrival -- From Iphigénie en Aulide to Orphée : a court-sponsored reform? -- Simplicity without primitivism -- Talking about opera -- Resolution?.
catalogue key
9028422
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [197]-208) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mark Darlow is Senior Lecturer in French at the University of Cambridge.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Eighteenth-century French cultural life was often characterised by quarrels, and the arrival of Viennese composer Christoph Wilibald Gluck in Paris in 1774 was no exception, sparking a five-year pamphlet and press controversy which featured a rival Neapolitan composer, Niccoló Piccinni. However, as this study shows, the Glick-Piccinni controversy was about far more than which composer was better suited to lead French operatic reform.
Long Description
Eighteenth-century French cultural life was often characterised by quarrels, and the arrival of Viennese composer Christoph Willibald Gluck in Paris in 1774 was no exception, sparking a five-year pamphlet and press controversy which featured a rival Neapolitan composer, Niccolo Piccinni. However, as this study shows, the Gluck-Piccinni controversy was about far more than which composer was better suited to lead French operatic reform. A consideration of cultural politics in 1770s Paris shows that a range of issues were at stake: court versus urban taste as the proper judge of music, whether amateurs or specialists should have the right to speak of opera, whether the epic or the tragic mode is more suited for drama reform, and even: why should the public argue about opera at all? Mark Darlow is Senior Lecturer in French at the University of Cambridge. (Legenda 2013)
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. viii
Abbreviations Usedp. ix
Chronology of Parisian Premieresp. x
Introductionp. 1
Opera Reform on the Eve of Gluck's Arrivalp. 23
From Iphigénie en Aulide to Orphée: A Court-Sponsored Reform?p. 66
Simplicity without Primitivismp. 100
Talking about Operap. 129
Resolution?p. 173
Conclusionp. 193
Bibliographyp. 197
Appendixp. 210
Indexp. 222
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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