Catalogue


Romantic intimacy /
Nancy Yousef.
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2013.
description
x, 182 p.
ISBN
0804786097 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780804786096 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2013.
isbn
0804786097 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780804786096 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : ethics, literature, and the forms of encounter -- Feeling for philosophy : the limits of sentimental certainty -- Knowing before loving : Rousseau and the ethics of exposure -- Sentimental justice : Hume, Wordsworth, and the ends of sympathy -- Respecting emotion : Austen's gratitude -- Alone together : romanticism, psychoanalysis, and the interpretation of silence -- Coda : sitting with strangers.
catalogue key
9027697
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Yousef is consistently brilliant in identifying and working through the countless shades and types of moral obligation, personal vulnerability, and communal justice manifested in eighteenth-century forms of intimacy and sympathy. Possessed of a remarkably fine ear, she succeeds in drawing out the psychological and interpersonal energies and valuations across a wide spectrum of sociable and intimate human engagement. This is a book of enormous riches."Thomas Pfau, Duke University
"Yousef's insistence on an irreducible solitude and the challenge it poses to an otherwise easy or instinctive or hard-wired ethics of identification, sympathy, and fellow-feeling is a powerful and timely salvo. The scholarship here is first-rate, the disciplinary reach extensive, and the writing and thinking superior."William Galperin, Rutgers University
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Summaries
Main Description
How much can we know about what other people are feeling and how much can we sympathize or empathize with them? The term "intimacy"which has always referred both to the inmost and personal, and to relationships of exceptional closenesscaptures a tension between a confidence in the possibility of shared experience and a competing belief that thoughts and feelings are irreducibly private. This book is an interdisciplinary study of shared feeling as imagined in eighteenth-century ethics, romantic literature, and twentieth-century psychoanalysis. Original interpretations of Hume, Rousseau, Kant, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Austen show how aspirations toward mutual recognition give way to appreciation of varied, nonreciprocal forms of intimacy. The book concludes with accounts of empathy and unconscious communication in the psychoanalytic setting, revealing the persistence of romantic preoccupations in modernity. Yousef offers a compelling account of how philosophical confidence in fellow-feeling and sympathy is transformed by literary attention to uneven forms of emotional response, including gratitude, disappointment, distraction, and absorption. In its wide-ranging and eclectic engagement with current debates on the relationship between ethics, affect, and aesthetics, the book will be crucial reading for students of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century culture, as well as for literary theorists.
Main Description
How much can we know about what other people are feeling and how much can we sympathize or empathize with them? The term "intimacy"--which has always referred both to the inmost and personal, and to relationships of exceptional closeness--captures a tension between a confidence in the possibility of shared experience and a competing belief that thoughts and feelings are irreducibly private. This book is an interdisciplinary study of shared feeling as imagined in eighteenth-century ethics, romantic literature, and twentieth-century psychoanalysis. Original interpretations of Hume, Rousseau, Kant, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Austen show how aspirations toward mutual recognition give way to appreciation of varied, nonreciprocal forms of intimacy. The book concludes with accounts of empathy and unconscious communication in the psychoanalytic setting, revealing the persistence of romantic preoccupations in modernity. Yousef offers a compelling account of how philosophical confidence in fellow-feeling and sympathy is transformed by literary attention to uneven forms of emotional response, including gratitude, disappointment, distraction, and absorption. In its wide-ranging and eclectic engagement with current debates on the relationship between ethics, affect, and aesthetics, the book will be crucial reading for students of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century culture, as well as for literary theorists.

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